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post #21 of 30
I love Arabic names. They are beautiful. When I was pregnant, I must have considered every single Arabic name choice. I couldn't make up my mind; I found them all wonderful. In the end, I named my daughter after me (ego boost -- ha ha!), because it has special meaning in my culture. I spelled it slightly differently just so others could pronounce it more easily.

My partner and I both have unusual names. His is common in his country. Mine is common in my parents' home country. Neither is common here in America, and so both names are constantly mis-pronounced. I used to be a bit bothered by my unusual name when I was a kid, but not anymore. I am proud of my name now. Love it. Love that people remember me easily because of my name. Love that my name is a great conversation starter.

Your Arabic name choices are great! I especially like Ziad and Kozem.
post #22 of 30
Thread Starter 
Thanks to everyone for your positive thoughts on this issue, and especially to Liquesce for possibly sharing her son's name

I don't think I was every really considering changing our naming strategy (of first name Arabic, middle name "American"), but I appreciate you all for reading and responding to my fretting! I'm really fortunate to have access to your perspectives!

One thing that kind of surprised me was the assumption on many people's part that since the US has a black president with a Muslim-sounding name, discrimination against others with similar names will decrease. I don't think this is necessarily true, but it would be great if it turns out to work that way. I agree that a certain level of acceptance (however grudging) of Obama's "strange" name was required for his election. Yet it seems like while many in the country are excited about Obama's election, others are threatened by it. And many factors will help to determine the ultimate cultural effects of the symbolism of Obama's person.

I know that many anti-racism activists, while excited about Obama's election, worried that having a black US president would make white people forget or dismiss the very real, ongoing systemic and individual racism that people of color still face. I guess I feel it's a little dangerous to assume that his election is a sign that "everything will be alright" for Arab Americans and others from the developing world, especially considering important but sad events of repression like the sham Holy Land Foundation Trial and the discrimination that many face on a daily basis.

One thing I do find hopeful (and which a lot of you brought up!) is the fact that bi- and multi-cultural children are becoming more common in our society. (The existence of this forum is a sign of that!) Famed pollster John Zoghby, in his book, The Way We'll Be, talks about a current generation of young adults with a more internationalist perspective (he calls them the first "global generation") and believes they are less prone to racism and more accepting of cultural variation. (Disclaimer: I have actually only heard him interviewed on NPR--haven't read the book.) I hope he's right!
post #23 of 30
My husband is Palestianin but from Lebanon and Iam American.

Both our kids have full on Arabic/muslim names, My first born is Mahmoud (after FIL) Ahmad (which is hubbys first name) Then our sec son is Kareem (hubbys aunt picked the name) Ahmad (hubbys first name)

we stuck with tradition in keeping the fathers name as the middle and last name. I acually love it makes chooseing a middle name soo easy lol.

If we have a girl her name will be Zaynab (after MIL) Ahmad (hubbys first name)
post #24 of 30
My husband is Persian, well, from a minority group in Persia. I worked like crazy to find a name that honored both my western heritage and his heritage. Now, nobody from either country can pronounce it because it was so unusual. So I say, go with what you like. You will never please everyone. I am choosing another Persian name for the second baby and who cares what it sounds like! It's not that I think that there is no racial profiling, but I kind of look at it from a "boy named Sue" perspective. There are a lot of famous, successful people with funny names. Karim Abdul Jabar. Oprah Winfrey. Rahm Emmanual (well... anyway...). Condoleeza Rice. Maybe they did face opposition, but it made them stronger, right?

Racial profiling is unfortunate but also keep in mind that a lot of "black" or African American names are also Arab- Jamal, Aisha, etc.

My mother was also worried about my daughter's name. But she loves it now and is so proud of it. I think Ziad is a lovely name, as is Karim, as is Ahmed, Omar, Mahmood, Zaynab, Habib (Habib is sooo sweet, is it not?) and no, they are not hard to say. If anyone complains, you can point out that Elizabeth is a Hebrew name, and not at all easy for English speakers to pronounce- but we manage it because we are used to it. Same with Moses, Jebediah, and so on. Is David easier than Daoud? No. We are just used to it.

If the whole country can suddenly get used to the name Kaiden/Cayden/Kayden/Caiden (because seriously, who ever heard of that name before 2003?), I think that they should be able to manage Ziad as well.
post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdnaMarie View Post
If the whole country can suddenly get used to the name Kaiden/Cayden/Kayden/Caiden (because seriously, who ever heard of that name before 2003?), I think that they should be able to manage Ziad as well.
post #26 of 30
My friend named her son Ze'ev and I think it is beautiful.
post #27 of 30
Arab names are very beautiful with great meanings too.
I especially like Tariq / Taric or Tarik; I like Arek too, which is actually polish but looks arab

Pick any name you want, plus any middle name. It will be fine for you, your families and the child, I am sure of it.
post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by humptydumpty View Post
Arab names are very beautiful with great meanings too.
I especially like Tariq / Taric or Tarik; I like Arek too, which is actually polish but looks arab
But in Arabic, Arek (or actually Arak) would be an anise-flavored liquor.
post #29 of 30
In Persian it is Arak... in Afghanistan, that means ANY kind of hard alcohol. Heh.
post #30 of 30
Good to know!
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