or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Baby › Baby Health › Vaccinations › Bill Gates Unleashes Swarm of Mosquitoes on Crowd:(about Malaria vaccine)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bill Gates Unleashes Swarm of Mosquitoes on Crowd:(about Malaria vaccine) - Page 2

post #21 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marnica View Post
You've had malaria yet you are still alive? Do tell.
My DH has had malaria too, and he is still alive. He was in the peace corps in west Africa, and he and many other peace corps volunteers got it. Pretty common. They had better access to health care than many African people though. He said it was pretty horrible, and it came back once (it can come back any time in your life), which is why he can not give blood now.
post #22 of 41
My DH had malaria. He got it in Vietnam. That is not what killed him.

AAs who have the sickle cell anemia gene, not the disease, do not get malaria as it is a natural genetic resistance to the disease. They would not need this new vaccine.

Carriers with the TaySachs gene have a natural genetic resistance to tuberculosis, it is believed.
post #23 of 41
This is a video of the actual talk Gates gave with the mosquitoes.
post #24 of 41
SunshineJ, that would be fine and well if vaccines were proven to work. Benefits can't honestly be weighed against risks when we don't really know with certainty what either are. As long as the vaccine manufacturers are keeping secrets, my assumption will be that the risks outweigh the benefits. Better safe than sorry. As others have said, good nutrition is the key. And it really always has been.
post #25 of 41
I don't think throwing more money at already rich companies are going to do much for the over all health of people in a 3rd world country. Like its been said, there are cheaper ways to do the same thing. As it was pointed out in another thread here about scarlet fever not having a vaccine but having the same decline as VAD its because they could treat it with antibiotics. Wow, really? you can treat a diease without a vaccine?! Shocking. From the WHO page linked to on the first page of this thread
Quote:
Recent data shows that large-scale use of WHO recommended strategies could rapidly reduce malaria, especially in areas of high transmission such as Africa. WHO and Member States have made significant gains in malaria elimination efforts. For example, the Maldives, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates have eliminated malaria. Country successes are due to intense national commitments and coordinated efforts with partners.
WOW, eliminated without a vaccine. Sorry to be so sarcastic I just get so sick of hearing how vaccines are the end all cure all of everything.

Oh I think the clean water was aimed less at how mosquitoes breed than what the people have to drink. If you are drinking dirty water, chances are you aren't gonna be too healthy to begin with. Not to mention if you get malaria and have vomiting and get dehydrated drinking dirty water isn't gonna be real good for you.

So what do you think would have happened if someone got West Nile and died from one of those mosquitoes? I am sure they were "clean" though.
post #26 of 41
Since the WHO strategies that quote is referring to include chemoprophylaxis for pregnant women and other at risk people, I doubt many people here agree with it.
post #27 of 41
I have removed many posts from the thread which are not appropriate for this discussion. I will be sending PMs later as my schedule allows.

In the past, threads such as this would have been hosted in our News & Current Events forum. Since N&CE is now closed, we will be hosting news discussions within the forum appropriate to the news item subject matter. However...
Quote:
threads still need to remain on-topic for the forum and should not be about individuals but about the general topic.

Due to our volunteer moderators time limitations, we no longer wish to host celebrity gossip, speculation or conspiracy theories. This will also extend to celebrity news threads. News and current events and celebrity news posted to these forums will be removed.
The subject of this thread is about this foundation's malaria vaccine advocacy. We can host discussion about the potential issues related to and alternatives to implementation of malaria vax programs but we will not host discussion about Bill Gates personally or discussions which speculate about motives or constitute conspiracy theory. If any of these types of discussions persist, the thread will be closed.
post #28 of 41
My uncle, in Special Forces, has malaria. It's still not a joke. Especially when you don't have the privilege of proper treatment quickly.

Quote:
Malaria is a vector-borne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites. It is widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, including parts of the Americas, Asia, and Africa. Each year, there are approximately 515 million cases of malaria, killing between one and three million people, the majority of whom are young children in Sub-Saharan Africa.[1] Ninety percent of malaria-related deaths occur in Sub-Saharan Africa. Malaria is commonly associated with poverty, but is also a cause of poverty[2] and a major hindrance to economic development.
I am completely on Team Bill Gates. To imply that it's anything less than deadly is missing the mark for 1-3 million people a year.
post #29 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Full Heart View Post
I don't think throwing more money at already rich companies are going to do much for the over all health of people in a 3rd world country. Like its been said, there are cheaper ways to do the same thing. As it was pointed out in another thread here about scarlet fever not having a vaccine but having the same decline as VAD its because they could treat it with antibiotics. Wow, really? you can treat a diease without a vaccine?! Shocking. From the WHO page linked to on the first page of this thread WOW, eliminated without a vaccine. Sorry to be so sarcastic I just get so sick of hearing how vaccines are the end all cure all of everything.

Oh I think the clean water was aimed less at how mosquitoes breed than what the people have to drink. If you are drinking dirty water, chances are you aren't gonna be too healthy to begin with. Not to mention if you get malaria and have vomiting and get dehydrated drinking dirty water isn't gonna be real good for you.

So what do you think would have happened if someone got West Nile and died from one of those mosquitoes? I am sure they were "clean" though.
Hunh? Which strategies were recommended by WHO? It doesn't say that. It wouldn't surprise me if vaccines were part of the strategies. I do know of one strategy, though:

Quote:
Today, DDT is still included in the WHO's list of insecticides recommended for IRS. Since the appointment of Arata Kochi as head of its anti-malaria division, WHO's policy has shifted from recommending IRS only in areas of seasonal or episodic transmission of malaria, to also advocating it in areas of continuous, intense transmission.[79] The WHO remains, however, "very much concerned with health consequences from use of DDT" and it has reaffirmed its commitment to eventually phasing it out.[80] S
post #30 of 41
What some folks seem to be missing is that your environment plays a huge role in fighting malaria. Yes, it has been eliminated in many places, including the U.S., but there was a central government in place to deal with it. In many of these places not only is there not a government that can deal with it, even if there was, they don't have the money or the infrastructure to deal with it.

Malaria is a huge issue, and no one would bat an eye about trying to conquer it if it were in an area that was not Africa. Vaccines are not the end all be all, but to shut down the whole conversation because they are a part of the discussion seems a little bit short sided.

And to add to the contraversy, here is a blog about the issue with DDT, but it also illustrates how this is a much more complicated problem to solve than to simply just spray pesticides.
http://membracid.wordpress.com/2007/...rachel-carson/
post #31 of 41
I've read that DDT isn't a lot of use anymore because mosquitoes evolved an immunity. But it is still the poster child for the evil done by environmentalists trying to save the birds from the nasty insecticides. We've all got to learn to read between the lines, I think.

Malaria is very nasty, indeed.
post #32 of 41
As far as I know, DDT is also part of the that WHO strategy (along with the drugs I was talking about)

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...toryId=6083944
post #33 of 41

Only In a Rich Country . . .

Here is the 'bare bones' of the situation. Vaccines are relatively cheap. Good food, vitamins, water . . . these things are all far more expensive. It's ugly, but it is true.

If YOU or I lived in a country where we could save our LIFE or our kid's LIFE for the present (even with the risk of illness from a mutating vaccine in the future) -- would we REALLY stand there and say, "sorry, if you can't spend a few thousand on me for the most optimum solution, don't expect me to take your 7 cent vaccine!" . . . We have CHOICES here for our families, many people do NOT.

Yes it would be great if these people could have all the wonderful choices that WE have, but, if that is not possible, don't think they are not grateful for a vaccine, even with its' risks, even if it only prolongs their lives for the short-term. Every day with my kids is precious -- and I am sure the Africans feel the same way.

As a side note, my kids WANT to send money to organizations that provide food and clean wells to Africans, in lieu of presents -- maybe if everyone did this, the need for cheap fixes would decrease . . .

Anyway -- don't scoff at a poor person's fix -- and don't blame everything on 'rich' people -- we all share responsibility for each other -- examine your own actions -- maybe you can only do a little, but that little is YOUR responsibility to do.
post #34 of 41
So who is the candidate for a malaria vaccine? People who live in the Sonoran Desert? There are no mosquitoes.

As I already noted, many people who live in malarial areas have a natural immunity to malaria. Are we going to test for this first?
post #35 of 41
I hardly think vaccines are cheap! They don't get to be the wealthiest of companies by offering a cheap product. Even a meningitis vaccine costs $10-$20 a shot. They (africa) got a cheaper version last year that cost 40 cents a shot. Still I hardly doubt a malaria vaccine will be in that vicinity. Probably a few hundred $ to begin with.

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/facts.../en/index.html WHO page I was quoting. Very last paragraph.

Malaria, Polio and other diseases are all part of the same problem; a bigger problem. Giving them vaccines is not going to solve the bigger problem. Eliminating the diseases won't fix the bigger picture but fixing the bigger picture will eliminate the diseases.

And this is all of course if a vaccine is even attainable, and then effective and then affordable.
post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Full Heart View Post
I hardly think vaccines are cheap! They don't get to be the wealthiest of companies by offering a cheap product. Even a meningitis vaccine costs $10-$20 a shot. They (africa) got a cheaper version last year that cost 40 cents a shot. Still I hardly doubt a malaria vaccine will be in that vicinity. Probably a few hundred $ to begin with.

And this is all of course if a vaccine is even attainable, and then effective and then affordable.
Good Point. I threw the 7 cents out there from the price of Tetanus shots in Africa -- you are absolutely right, Malaria could be much more expensive . . . Of course, if the vaccine only costs, say, 3.5 cents to manufacture, then that leaves a 50% profit, so, yes, a company could grow VERY rich on 7 cent vaccines . . . Unfortunately, the cost is still probably cheaper than the BEST solution . . . And, most Americans are not willing to forgo vacations, drive $200 cars, shop at goodwill, etc. so that we could give all our extra money away to Africa.

Note, I think it would be GREAT of everybody did this so that they could afford the BEST answer -- I just don't think it likely. Look at how much movies bring in each week -- if everybody put their 8 bucks into helping others . . . Sorry! (That's a rant for another day!! : )
post #37 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by applejuice View Post
So who is the candidate for a malaria vaccine? People who live in the Sonoran Desert? There are no mosquitoes.

As I already noted, many people who live in malarial areas have a natural immunity to malaria. Are we going to test for this first?
: If this were true and the majority have immunity, why are so many people dying?

Do you think that we should not have gotten rid of it here? And just depended on our natural immunity?
post #38 of 41
I guess you did not care to read my first post. Oh, well.
post #39 of 41
My grandfather who was in Africa during WWI got malaria at age ca 22 but lived to be 87.
post #40 of 41
Are you talking about this one?
Quote:
Originally Posted by applejuice View Post
My DH had malaria. He got it in Vietnam. That is not what killed him.

AAs who have the sickle cell anemia gene, not the disease, do not get malaria as it is a natural genetic resistance to the disease. They would not need this new vaccine.

Carriers with the TaySachs gene have a natural genetic resistance to tuberculosis, it is believed.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Vaccinations
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Baby › Baby Health › Vaccinations › Bill Gates Unleashes Swarm of Mosquitoes on Crowd:(about Malaria vaccine)