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interracial havens - Page 2

post #21 of 33
I live in the East Village area of NY and we still get stares. There are lots of multiracial couples, but it's not really the norm. NYC can be really segregatedn that way.
We live in a predominantly White area and I've been confused for the nanny about 4 or 5 times.
post #22 of 33
I live in the San Francisco Bay Area. We're the only white couple on the block. We have neighbors who are Arab, Peruvian, Phillipino, Indian, Black... you get the idea.

My son's preschool is about 50% white, but the other 50% are everything. I was just there today when all the kids were out at lunch, and really liking that picture.

post #23 of 33
It was fairly commin in the Hampton Roads area of Va (ner VA Beach) b/c the huge military population.

I live in an area in TN that is mostly white, but my small town has tons and tons of biracial kids.
post #24 of 33
As a biracial Montrealer who lived in Mtl for the first 20 years of my life, then near Toronto for the next 10, then back to Mtl, I have read this thread with interest.
There are many, many interracial couples in Montreal and I totally agree that there is political and linguistic history that impacts white francophone attitudes towards "others," who include English speakers regardless of race or family history (ie. many English Montrealers' families have been here for generations). And there seems to be some "fetishization" of black women, also rooted in history, IMO. I sometimes think it's more of a linguisitic issue than a racial one, it seems more important to be French than to be white. Again, IMO. I have a french last name (and a french family on one side that have been here for many generations) so I had a greater measure of acceptance. DH is white (not French), we never had a problem in Mtl. regarding our relationship. I haven't seen the kind or racism I have heard about in the States.

However, having spent a great deal of time in Toronto, the big difference I have noticed between Mtl and TO is that in TO, there is more real integration of newcomers and all races. You hear accents and see ppl of every colour in every facet of life. In Montreal, a certain amount of the population wants (and the laws enforce) people to be French, yet there is still racial/linguisitic/cultural segregation in work opportunities, etc. White, French people still represent the 'norm' whereas in Toronto there is a real sense of acceptance of everyone as Torontonians. I really loved that.

DH lived his whole life in Montreal and still would get passed up for jobs because he has an Anglo name. It's race AND language there. So when you get a bad attitude in Montreal, it may very well be the fact that you're english more than your colour or race. Ok, rant over.
post #25 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by WilliamsMama View Post
I live in the East Village area of NY and we still get stares. There are lots of multiracial couples, but it's not really the norm. NYC can be really segregatedn that way.
We live in a predominantly White area and I've been confused for the nanny about 4 or 5 times.

We live in Park Slope Brooklyn and never get any stares! I've found so many other interracial couples in nyc, in fact, as a doula, my first 12 clients were all interracial!
post #26 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
It was fairly commin in the Hampton Roads area of Va (ner VA Beach) b/c the huge military population.
Military bases are definitely havens! I'm a biracial Army brat myself. There's a lot of federal employees and military families around here too. DC is just crawling with them.
post #27 of 33
Alaska has TONS of multiethnic families.. and we have some that you probably wouldn't find elsewhere like Alaskan Native/Filipino, Alaskan Native/AA, Alaskan Native/Hispanic, Samoan/Alaskan Native, etc..

My kids are Alaskan Native/Filipino/white (well, depending on the kid specifically)..
Mixed families are VERY common here..


In my own block of town there are 12 homes.. 1 Filipino, 2 white, 1 AA, 1 Samoan, 1 Russian, and the other 6 are Hispanic families- Mexican, Dominican, Guatemalan, specifically.

There are only a few families in AK from Darfur and Sudan as of yet, though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rredhead View Post
I live in the San Francisco Bay Area. We're the only white couple on the block. We have neighbors who are Arab, Peruvian, Phillipino, Indian, Black... you get the idea.
I have NEVER seen Filipino spelled this way before.
post #28 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinoikoi View Post



I have NEVER seen Filipino spelled this way before.
From what I understand there is a cultural movement to spell it that way because there is no "F" in Tagalog (thus the name of the people is reflective of colonialism). At least this is what my students told me last year (also in the Bay Area btw).

Carry on...
post #29 of 33
Although I am single, I did have an Asian girlfriend back in college. We lived in the San Francisco Bay Area and there were a few stares because we were an unusal mixed race couple (I'm AA) but other than that we have recieve no hostile remarks.


Now I live in Atlanta and mixed-race couples are normal here. No one even bats an eye in most areas. Most of them are black men with white women but other types of mixed race couples certainly do exist.
post #30 of 33
Chalk another up for Bay Area (East bay specifically), I can't honestly recall the last time I saw a "standard" white couple, around here most of the couples either seem to be interracial (including my wife and I), or homosexual.

With regard to the spelling of Filipino, I'd always assumed it was Ph not F, but that's probably because it's the Phillipines, not the Fillipines.
post #31 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatherTryingToHelp View Post
With regard to the spelling of Filipino, I'd always assumed it was Ph not F, but that's probably because it's the Phillipines, not the Fillipines.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chamomile Girl View Post
From what I understand there is a cultural movement to spell it that way because there is no "F" in Tagalog (thus the name of the people is reflective of colonialism). At least this is what my students told me last year (also in the Bay Area btw).

Carry on...
yes, but in Tagalog, the F sound and the P sound are very similar linguistically. It appears and can be confusing when listening to people that speak Tagalog as a first language speaking English. For example, my dp often says "fencil" for pencil... just as in with Japanese speakers the R sound is sometimes switched with the L sound.. I don't think I am explaining this very well but the actual "sound" in Tagalog is sort of BETWEEN an English P and F, so in English the speaker will sometimes go back and forth between the two English letters.. so I guess if someone were to reject the "colonialist" spelling, the better choice would be something like Pilipino, wouldn't it?

When dp told me he was going to build the kids a port in the backyard, I nearly fell down in a giggling fit.. it wasn't so much the word switch but the seriousness he used when he described what his port was going to look like.. and no, we do not live with a waterway in our backyard.

BTW: it isn't "Phillipines".. it's Philippines.
post #32 of 33
We are a multiracial family living in NW FL. It is not very diverse here. I am noticing a few more multi-racial, AA and Latin kids, but our multi-racial kids do stand out as being just a few of the local kids who aren't blonde-haired and blue eyed. We haven't run into any problems, except some tense feelings after the elections in Nov.

DH has had some problems recently with racist remarks from people within his career field here. He's a singer-songwriter and has run into some jams.
post #33 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
When dp told me he was going to build the kids a port in the backyard, I nearly fell down in a giggling fit.. it wasn't so much the word switch but the seriousness he used when he described what his port was going to look like.. and no, we do not live with a waterway in our backyard.
Okay. I had to giggle at this. In German there's less problems with enunciation than with word choice. The vocabulary is so similar but... not quite. A few weeks ago my DH told me that they had an enunciation (announcement) about the new planning (schedule) that they'd been working on since (for) 6 months now. Soooo close!
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