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talk to me about line drying laundry - Page 2

post #21 of 57
I LOVE LOVE LOVE drying our clothes outside! DP sometimes complains that his shirts and boxers feel "starched", but I think it is an added bonus! I also LOVE crunchy towels- I think they are more absorbant.

Sometimes I give all the clothes a short whirl in the dryer after taking them down to remove any bugs and to cut down on the "starchy" feeling. Especially during Japenese beetle and June bug season here in Indiana.

We have an umbrella style rack that fits into a sleeve in the ground. It cost less than $50 at the hardware store. I plan to buy the $30 indoor stand so that I can use it in the basement this winter.
post #22 of 57
We use drying racks. We don't have any clotheslines and I like the fact that they are portable. We probably dry 90% of our clothes and towels, sheets, etc on the racks. Winter and summer. In the winter, we position the racks near heating vents and it helps with the moisture level in the house. So, we kill two birds with one stone.

In the summer, we just move the racks outside or, if it is raining, to the screened porch. I LOVE the idea of planting lavendar nearby. I will get some tomorrow and put it in pots on the deck near where we usually put the racks. Inspired idea.
post #23 of 57
I haven't plugged in my dryer in almost a year now and it's lovely. Everything is line dried in the sun outside or if it's raining they are hung on a rack in my kitchen. We have this and it works great. Holds a full load of laundry or diapers. It's much much sturdier than it looks and it is cheap too. It paid for itself in the first month.:
post #24 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by zech13_9_goforgold View Post
What about allergies? It sounds like a nightmare to have all those particles in my sheets and clothes as romantic as sun-dried sheets sound.
We don't notice this as a problem for all but a couple weeks out of the year. During those couple weeks the pine pollen is so bad that you literally see yellow clouds floating across the fields. A short walk in the yard will give your shoes a layer of pollen. It's incredible. I came from the Northwest and never saw anything like this. The south sure is an amazing place.

Anyway....I find that a shake of the towels before I hang them also helps with crunchies. You really get used to it, I think. We line dry everything and love it. DH gets dissappointed now if I use the dryer, we just love the smell and that we used free power to dry our clothes.

We're going to be creating some clothesline space in our home for rainy days.

You'll want a good chair or table to set your laundry bakset on. You'll get tired of bending over that much. Also, make or buy something to hang your clothes pins in, you want it to be convenient and accessible to make your life easier.
post #25 of 57
I'm not sure if this has been mentioned, but if you start an extra spin cycle after your clothes are done washing it gets any weighty moisture out.
post #26 of 57
I love to line dry too. I wish this rain would go away because I really need to get some laundry done.

For the clothes pins, I found this blog with a cute idea:
http://www.thefamilyhomestead.com/clothespinbag.htm

I made one out of my son's outgrown shirt in under 10 minutes.
post #27 of 57
For clothespins I know a lady who just cut a wedge out of the top of a plastic milk jug, leaving the handle intact. Then she could just grab the jug and hang it on a nail next to her line.
post #28 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by nerdymom View Post
For clothespins I know a lady who just cut a wedge out of the top of a plastic milk jug, leaving the handle intact. Then she could just grab the jug and hang it on a nail next to her line.
Or you could cut the bottom of the handle off, and then hook the jug on your clothesline or in your pocket. That's what I do!

See here: Repurposing a milk jug
post #29 of 57
I've been really trying to line dry, especially the diapers, and it really did help lower our power bill. Plus, the clothes smell so clean! On rainy days, I just use a drying rack on our screened in front porch. The only problem I've ran into is bugs! I hate bugs and I have to be so careful not to bring them in. Yesterday I was folding diapers and a huge bug ran out of one of the pocket diapers as I was stuffing it. I made my dh check all the other pocket ones to make sure there weren't any more hiding in there.
post #30 of 57
I guess it might be a cultural difference but I am amazed by this thread - I have never owned an electric dryer and I live on a small island off the northwest coast of england so we dont get a lot of hot sunny weather. We line dry stuff when we can and when we cant we use drying racks indoors, we have some freestanding ones and also some mini racks that hook on to the top of radiators and are great. I have never missed having an electric dryer apart from when I did a month long trial of cloth nappies (diapers) and realised it took just too long to dry them (I needed to buy a months worth as some took 4 days to dry!!!!) and so I EC'ed where I could and used biodegradable sposies as well.

Now my DD's are pretty much PL I cant see any reason to have an electric dryer & I have noticed that my clothes always smell so fresh when they have been outside - and there is nothing better than the smell of 2 freshly bathed, sleepy, toddlers in freshly line dried pj's!! it is soo addictive

oh and FTR I do one to two laundry loads per day
post #31 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by rainbowsprite View Post
there is nothing better than the smell of 2 freshly bathed, sleepy, toddlers in freshly line dried pj's!! it is soo addictive
post #32 of 57
Line drying is something I have considered starting, and I appreciate all the great ideas on this thread. So do you just take clothes off line, shake, and wear? Or do you need to iron them first? What about those sheets everyone is raving about? Do they get ironed?
And I am seeing one person using the dryer before, and another after, they hang clothes outside. Is this the exception or normal? Frankly I am afraid that once they went into the dryer I'd move on and forget!
post #33 of 57
I just thought of another question - can you dry shirts on hangers? I see the advice about putting them on a line upside down to protect the shoulders...what about using a clothing rack and drying them on hangers? I am thinking specifically about my husband's button down work shirts.
post #34 of 57
You can dry clothes on hangers, but my DH's shirts are too broad in the shoulders. The hangar leaves marks, because the shoulders droop off the end of the hangar.

I don't use my dryer except for CD inserts.
post #35 of 57
CD are about the only thing I put in the dryer before hanging to help somewhat with the stiffness factor. I do it before because I can't see lugging the basket back into the basement to fluff after hanging up. Sometimes I'll put dressier shirts/pants in the dryer for a few minutes to de-wrinkle and then hang outside (again before hanging).

I don't dry on hangers because it leaves our shoulders looking funny, but may work for some people. I think a lot depends on the type of fabric you are talking about too. I also don't like to hang from the bottom corners because it leaves some cotton fabrics with funny marks at the bottom - my neighbor hangs all her shirts that way though. I always hang shirts across the chest - from armpit to armpit with the shirt hung over the line. Any marks from clothespins/pulls on fabric are in the pits so noone every sees!!
post #36 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by henny penny View Post
For a touch of luxury we planted a row of lavender plants under our clothesline. So beautiful and the sheets and towels smell heavenly!
You are a genius. A GENIUS!
post #37 of 57
We live in a townhome with HOA restrictions and a tiny backyard (barely bigger than the patio). The "rule" is nothing can be above the fence line, so I put a retractable line on the fence and stretch it across the patio to the shed wall to a hook when I need to use it. The hook is technically above the fence line, but once you hang something, it droops below the fence line, which is perfect.

Since our space on the line is limited, I generally line dry all linens and non-clothing outside in the bright California sunshine. (All of these are white or off-white in our house.) I toss some of them into the dryer first for a few minutes by setting it for the lowest number of minutes on the lowest heat: towels, rugs, anything heavy and this prevents the crunch factor. Our space is too small to benefit from any breezes. I busy myself with the next load or something else right in that immediate area while it is drying in the dryer for those few minutes. I've tried putting things in AFTER line drying and it takes longer to achieve the same effect.

I still dry our clothing in the dryer mostly. We have a gas dryer and I use the lowest heat on the "least dry" setting (sensor), then hang items over the edge of the basket and/or hang them up for the rest of the dry time. Our clothes last a lot longer this way (compared to all dryer time and higher heats) and we don't get any weirdness on our clothing. I do one load a day usually, so it is easy to keep up with and get completely put away before needing the line and basket again.

I love the idea of growing lavender near the line! I had all of our herbs near the line last summer, but none of the smells transferred. I wonder if you have to walk on it to activate it? Our have to be in pots. Hmmm....

I just line-dried sheets!!!! Takes less time for me than in the dryer and the smell is just heavenly!!!

I don't iron anything in this house! Well, I break out the iron for craft projects and sewing projects...but not for clothes or linens or whatnot from laundry.
post #38 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunflower.mama View Post
I just thought of another question - can you dry shirts on hangers? I see the advice about putting them on a line upside down to protect the shoulders...what about using a clothing rack and drying them on hangers? I am thinking specifically about my husband's button down work shirts.
I just have to say first, I love, love, love my clothesline!!: It runs about 75 feet to a tall tree, so everything is above the grass, swaying in the breeze, no dragging sheets! I line dry as often as I can, and I'm often bummed if I'm too busy to get the clothes out before I need to leave the house. It is meditative to me, and I love arranging colors, sizes, likes with likes etc.

I use padded hangers for all of our shirts, even DH's fancy work shirts. I also request the hangers from kids' clothes stores (I use them for my kids' clothes which aren't heavy enough to weigh them down without the pads and cause those pinch marks at shoulder area...) and I have collected enough that I can use those for my boys' stuff. I especially like the pants hangers they use in stores with the the two metal clips, and I can just hang them straight, lengthwise on the line. I hang all of our pants this way! This allows me to utilize more space on the line, and most days I can fit about 3-4 loads out there!

For drying: I bring everything in, throw it all into the dryer and my tip for avoiding crunchiness: throw in a moistened washcloth that tosses in amongst the clothes for all of 5 minutes, and voila! Softened clothes, no wrinkles! Oh, and on the washcloth I may dot a drop or two of EO. Or toss in some sprigs of lavender!
post #39 of 57
I started line drying a couple months ago and I really like it now. At first, the crunchy towels bothered me but I like it now.

I actually drive by the Amish houses and check out their clotheslines to see their tricks. I've learned to hand jeans by the waist rather than the pant legs because they dry faster.

I learned to install a 4' section of chain and just hand my shirts directly on hangers and then put the hangers through the chains. I tried to just put the hangers on the line, but we have too much wind for that. I was picking up wet, and dirty shirts off my lawn about 5 minutes after hanging them out. That has greatly simplified my laundry procedure.

I also have 2 lines on pulleys and I use both lines. That allows me to separate my clothes as I'm putting them up. The kids' clothes go on one line and DH's and my clothes go on the other line. That lets me put them in the basket in the order I will put them away. I am so much better about doing laundry now that I'm using the line.
post #40 of 57

rainbow laundry

I don't know why communities ban hanging laundry. I derive a lot of joy from watching laudry blow and dance in the wind. Especially because I always make a rainbow with our colorful clothes. I get positive comments on it constantly, and even had a photographer do a photo shoot in front of our line! It helps that we wear lots of bright colors.

If you have a small yard or want to keep the laundry hidden those umbrella hangers are good: tons of line space and they blow around in the wind. They have them at our Home Depot for $40.

Have fun with your laundry!
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