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Why cant they bring back the days ... - Page 3

post #41 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by KaraBoo View Post
I really dislike it when shops are closed automatically on Sunday. Not everyone is in church on Sunday...
Exactly.
post #42 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthla View Post
So what do you do if you work 5 days a week, have your Sabbath on a 6th day, and then the 7th day, the only day you're truly available for big shopping projects, the stores are all closed?
Since this is us - we frequent the 24 hour local grocery store (closed on Sundays - yes, 24 hours but closed on Sundays ) on the weeknights and Friday after work (in the summer, when we have more time) or Saturday night after sundown (this is much easier in the winter), we cram in our retail shopping. There are, however, LOTS of places we'd love to shop but only get to when we beg our bosses to do errands and stop by on the fly. It's not great, let me tell you that.

Honestly, I think that's why so many of us Shabbos-observers have one SAH parent, or one parent working a weird shift (super late, super early, or night). It was almost impossible to get things done with both of us working FT. Things are much nicer (though financially tighter) with me WAH now.

But yeah, I agree that it's a narrow-minded way to do things. If you want a special family day off, do it yourself. The Jews have been doing it for thousands of years without without help from external country-mandated laws, and you can too!
post #43 of 108
We have blue laws here but they are weird. The grocery store is allowed to be open and sell whatever they want. A fabric store can be open and sell fabric but not craft items. The hardware store can be open and sell lumber but not the nails to put it together with. They have ropes that section off the areas that they are not allowed to sell in. And auto parts stores are allowed to be open. Most everything except 24 hour stores close at 6:00 on Sunday. All of the malls and general stores are closed. Most bookstores are closed although there is one in the county that stays open. It's weird. All the countires around us are open seven days a week. There are even banks open on Sunday in neighboring counties. But not here.

Kathi
post #44 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dakota's Mom View Post
We have blue laws here but they are weird. The grocery store is allowed to be open and sell whatever they want. A fabric store can be open and sell fabric but not craft items. The hardware store can be open and sell lumber but not the nails to put it together with.
Any ideas why you can't buy craft items or nails on Sunday? That just seems strange. I know that's only a sampling of restrictions, but I don't see what's so 'wrong' about buying craft items on a Sunday.

Around here, I think the only restrictions are buying beer/wine/liquor. I think beer can be purchased after 1pm on Sundays, but no wine can be purchased all day. My DH's hometown (maybe the whole state - Indiana) doesn't allow beer sales in stores on Sunday, but you can go to a bar and buy a beer. Kind of dumb to me b/c ou can buy/drink a beer at a bar (and then drive home afterwards), but you can't buy it in a store and then take it home (thus, not driving after drinking). It's something weird like that. I don't know what restrictions there are on wine as that's not something DH would ever know about. He would never be seen in public drinking wine.
post #45 of 108
Years ago when I worked on Saturday and had a day off during the week, I loved that day to run errands. No one was around and traffic was not bad. Then when I went to a M-F job for a year, I HATED shopping on weekends. I literally started getting up early and running all errands Saturday morning to not have all the crowds. Then when I had an outside sales job, I would run my errands in my territory between appts or to avoid hitting traffic. Then I had my weekends free again.

Being a SAH mom for 7 years, I have always ran my errands during the week because everyone else is out during the weekend. As much as I think it would be great for not having to be open, in this society it is a long stretch since people work all over the clock now and everyday of the week.
post #46 of 108
I would like things closed on Sunday. Closing early on Saturday...that I would't care so much about, though.
post #47 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpchez View Post
Sunday was my favorite day to work (retail in MA pays time and a half on Sundays)
I hated working Sundays when I worked retail. If they paid time and a half, I'd probably have a different opinion.

As to the OP, no way I'd be happy if everything was closed on Sundays. I'm not religious and don't appreciate religion being imposed on me at all.
post #48 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by lemongrass View Post
I'm not religious and don't appreciate religion being imposed on me at all.
And I AM religious and feel the same way, even if it was MY religion.
post #49 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by smeisnotapirate View Post
And I AM religious and feel the same way, even if it was MY religion.
If I was religious, I'd be like you.
post #50 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scribe View Post
I have a really hard time seeing how this could benefit anyone.
It could benefit those employees who want off Sundays but can't because their store is open and their boss says they have to work.
post #51 of 108
And what about the people who want to work Sunday, like parents who can only work weekends when their partner is home or students who have class during the week. I would have been screwed in university if I couldn't have worked Sundays.

What about employees who want any other day off?
post #52 of 108
I've lived in a place where stores were closed on Saturday and most of Sunday. It's awful. I would never, ever want to go back to that.
post #53 of 108
This would be a good thing to impose on the population why?

If it violates your religious beliefs to work on Sunday, don't take the job. If it violates your religious beliefs to shop on Sunday, stay home. Your religious beliefs aren't everyone's religous beliefs.

I work full time out of the home and do most of my shopping on Sunday. I do have to work the occasional Sunday (higher education), but then I get a random day off during the week.
post #54 of 108
I think a day off out of 7 for rest, recreation and family is a great idea. However, I think every family should get to choose that day for themselves, not have it imposed on them.
post #55 of 108
This is a very interesting thread!

I can see why it would be nice and it has nothing to do with church or religion to me. I don't know if I can really explain it but it is part of the reason that I really like Christmas. I think it's neat to have a day when nobody is doing their normal day-to-day things. I don't think it is really the same to take a day off by yourself or with your family when the whole rest of the world is still spinning around you.

I don't know if I am making any sense but I do really appreciate that "break" from the every day.

As far as is being a pain to not be able to shop for one day out of seven, I think that's just silly I know it can be inconvenient, there are days when I've really needed something and then thought, "crap, it's Sunday" but it has never killed me and we usually end up doing something more fun than we would have anyway
post #56 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolip View Post
As far as is being a pain to not be able to shop for one day out of seven, I think that's just silly I know it can be inconvenient, there are days when I've really needed something and then thought, "crap, it's Sunday" but it has never killed me and we usually end up doing something more fun than we would have anyway
It the entire world worked and worshipped on the same schedule, sure. But since it doesn't, having one day where everything is closed can be a very big inconvenience for some people. People on this thread have already pointed out why.
post #57 of 108
Oh it's not just those stores that close on Sundays that bother me. I don't like any stores with irregular opening hours. Many stores here are like Mon - Wed. 9 - 6p, Thur. Fri. are until 8 or 9, Saturday 10 - 7 and sunday 12 - 5p... etc. Bah I hate those. I can never remember them, and they seem to change those a lot. Some stores have winter hours, summer hours and holiday hours, too. Now I just mostly shop in those stores that are open the same everyday. My favorite store is open 9 - 9 everyday of the year, including any holidays.
post #58 of 108
I too, have a bit of nostalgia for the time when stores closed early on Sat and were closed on Sunday. I completely understand why people who are not Christian would be unhappy to have store hours regulated by the principles of another religion (esp if your religion has a different day set aside for rest and worship). But the reason I miss those days isn't about the religious meaning (my family can hold the day for rest and worship regardless of what the rest of the community does) but it has to do with the cultural shift that goes along with a society of 24/7 stores, instant communication, uninterrupted services and unlimited expectations.

Religious origins aside, there's something to be said for allowing people (and communities) a rest. And for being able to postpone the fulfillment of desires that are not urgent. And for being free from the expectation that you have to be available all the time. And for the less obvious acknowledgement that the lives and needs of others have value too. There *is* a cost to individuals and society though. It's hard to put into words, but the change that has occurred has resulted in greater ease and convenience in many ways, but also in greater pressure and expectations and demands as well. It may be good in many ways, but it still comes with a cost.

I can't say I would choose to give up my conveniences. I'm a fan of shopping from home over the internet myself. But I do miss the less pressured, less demanding atmosphere. When people weren't able to get everything done on the weekend, then they weren't *expected* to. Ykwim? There were more allowances for people to do stuff during the week b/c it was understood that you needed to.

I have to acknowledge too, that for me to have all these conveniences, someone else must provide the services. And it tends to be those folks who are lower on the socioeconomic status pole who end up working the crummy hours, nights and holidays and such. So the result of all this increased convenience is that demands on time and family for some groups in society are greater. I always wonder whether we so badly need to shop 24 hrs a day in the week before Christmas that those employees at Walmart and Target and such should be forced to work all those hours. When stores closed on Sunday, there was no question that every family could count on having that day every week together. I've worked those jobs in the past (fast food and retail) so I have firsthand experience. Interestingly, my first retail job was at a store that *was* closed on Sunday and I loved that.

So, even though it's great to have conveniences and greater access to services and goods, there are costs too. I don't think our society is ever going to go back to the way it was before. If we closed businesses now, people would only be annoyed and inconvenienced b/c the expectation is firmly ingrained that we need to have these things available as they are now. It would require a major adjustment in expectations at so many levels and I don't see that happening. But I do understand the nostalgia of the original post.
post #59 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolip View Post
As far as is being a pain to not be able to shop for one day out of seven, I think that's just silly
See, for us it's not one day out of seven, but one day out of two. I simply cannot get everything I need to get done during the weekdays. I need for things to be open on Sundays.
post #60 of 108
I understand the expectation part, but I don't think it really holds weight.

Look at the Orthodox Jewish population - some are retail and blue collar, others are doctors and accountants and lawyers. ALL observe a Shabbat, different from the "mainstream" USofA and still manage to hold jobs down AND meet their family commitment.

If people are committed to finding a job that allows them and their family a rest, they can. Orthodox Jews have for thousands of years, through good times and bad. Whether the gov't orders a day off or not. And it would be nice, putting those places that don't allow their workers their day of rest out of business because they can't find workers. THAT would be the way to change society. From the family out - not the government in.
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