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Periods and Ballet Class - Page 4

post #61 of 77
I read on another site that maybe your DD could ask if she can switch to black leotards and a black skirt just during that time of the month. However, I think I'd stick with a tampon just during class.
post #62 of 77
I took ballet classes when I was young. It was never really serious, everyone wore underwear, skirts, etc...But I hated wearing a pad. It shifted, bunched up, I was afraid of leaks... If anyone gave me the option of a tampon, I would have probably continued dancing for longer.
post #63 of 77
I remember being mortified by this too. After I skipped classes a few times during my period, my mother spoke with my dance teacher, and I was given permission to wear a skirt during my cycle. That was okay, but I still felt bulky and clumsy with a pad under my leotard, and at some point started using tampons.
post #64 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by marimara View Post
Ummm, ok, I guess my dd won't be doing ballet because I see this whole thread as being completely ridiculous. A young girl forced to use tampons? Panty lines getting in the way of seeing body form? Seriously I am a massage therapist and I even give massages to people in underwear and no it doesn't even get in the way of me seeing every muscle in their body :

I really have no place in this forum since my dd is 2 but came across the thread from the homepage So. that's my disclaimer. Feel free to ignore my comments

(I saw this in new posts too). ITA with you, Marimara.

Since dd has been walking, several people have told me "She's going to be a dancer." "She's going to be a ballarina" (Because only my toddler likes to dance, you know ). On the defensive, I tell them, "She can be a dancer but no girl of mine will be a ballarina." That goes for any sport that shows off her body like it's nothing.

As a girl, I would have been completely-head-over-heels-suicidally-mortified if I wasn't *allowed* to wear panties and had to wear a skin tight outfit during my period (or skin tight at all).

I knew I didn't want dd to be a ballarina from day one. I didn't know it was this bad until reading this thread though. Yikes. This is one plea/argument dd will not win when she's older.
post #65 of 77
Regarding the posts on how this thread has a few people convinced that they will never put their dd's in ballet classes, I have to say that I think ballet was one of the best influences for me during that extremely awkward adolescent phase when all the changes in my body were new. I was gangly, awkward, and "early bloomer" who slouched all the time to try to hide my breasts. Ballet actually helped me to feel good about my body, to stand up straight and tall, to know my physical strengths, to feel poised and graceful at a time when I didn't feel that way around my peers. I know dance can have some serious pitfalls for body image issues, but for me (probably due to a great teacher) it was a healthy influence. I went on to be a very successful athlete in high school, college and beyond, and I credit my ballet classes for building some of the foundation that helped me achieve that. And dance continues to bring me joy, as an adult many years later.
post #66 of 77
I don't think ballet is a particularly "body showing" sport....

Classes are serious business. Any *serious* sport by teen years is going to be pretty strict if you're in a serious track. If you're doing ballet classes for fun, then the dress code isn't going to be as strict as we're discussing here. What I'm speaking of, by 11 or 12 when they would be mostly starting their periods, dancers would be in class at least 3 days a week for a total of at LEAST 6 hours a week total. They are athletes in training. A swimmer at the same level, wouldn't take a week off every month. A gymnast would still wear what was appropriate for their sport. A runner would still work out.

IME more "recreational" dancers and dance teams and the like are much more likely to be seen in revealing clothing. Ballet dancers (ballerinas if you like) aren't usually going to be the ones out on a sports field shaking it ya know?

-Angela
post #67 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by MayBaby2007 View Post
(I saw this in new posts too).
That goes for any sport that shows off her body like it's nothing.

As a girl, I would have been completely-head-over-heels-suicidally-mortified if I wasn't *allowed* to wear panties and had to wear a skin tight outfit during my period (or skin tight at all).

I knew I didn't want dd to be a ballarina from day one. I didn't know it was this bad until reading this thread though. Yikes. This is one plea/argument dd will not win when she's older.
This is SO NOT what serious ballet is about. Serious traditional ballet is NOT about sexy.

Alegna said it well here,

Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna
IME more "recreational" dancers and dance teams and the like are much more likely to be seen in revealing clothing. Ballet dancers (ballerinas if you like) aren't usually going to be the ones out on a sports field shaking it ya know?

-Angela
but I just had to comment, too.

I also agree with the PP that compared wearing underwear in a serious ballet class to a TopChef contestant opening up a can of mushroom soup...

I actually just got into a conversation with my hairdresser about ballet, finding a school for the kids to go to, dance competitions, etc. I have to say that competition dance to me isn't what traditional ballet is about....it's about dancing for the joy of it, for the challenge....not about winning trophies, IMO. So my kids won't be involved in competition dance classes. But I guess that's getting a little off topic, so I'll stop.

I will also agree that taking serious, traditional ballet classes from the age of 6-21 helped me in so many ways, I can't even count them.
post #68 of 77
Wow - so many former dancers here!!

I remember when I began menstruating - and using a pad with ballet -and it being SO uncomfortable and getting all wadded up because your legs are crossed and squeezed together. So I was always having to go change it midway thru class - and going to the restroom during classes is pretty much a BIG no-no if done on anything but a very rare basis.

I also thought it smelled because I'd get so sweaty and all... between that and the bulkiness I was sure EVERYONE must know. It was AWFUL.

I was Soooooo happy to figure out how to use a tampon!

It's funny now, but at the time (I was almost 13) I thought the *entire* tampon, applicator and all was supposed to go inside. So I think it might be best to approach it as "This is probably obvious to you, but here's how the tampon works" and then demonstrate by inserting it with one hand into a little "hole" made with the other hand and show how to use the applicator to push it in past the entrance to the "hole". Simple things, obvious to us but not to a newly menstruating girl.
post #69 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by The4OfUs View Post
This is SO NOT what serious ballet is about. Serious traditional ballet is NOT about sexy.

Alegna said it well here,



but I just had to comment, too.

I also agree with the PP that compared wearing underwear in a serious ballet class to a TopChef contestant opening up a can of mushroom soup...

I actually just got into a conversation with my hairdresser about ballet, finding a school for the kids to go to, dance competitions, etc. I have to say that competition dance to me isn't what traditional ballet is about....it's about dancing for the joy of it, for the challenge....not about winning trophies, IMO. So my kids won't be involved in competition dance classes. But I guess that's getting a little off topic, so I'll stop.

I will also agree that taking serious, traditional ballet classes from the age of 6-21 helped me in so many ways, I can't even count them.
Exactly! There is *nothing* sexy about serious ballet. It's black leotard, pink tights, hair in a bun all the way. You wouldn't wear underwear with a bathing suit, so why wear them with a leotard? It's the same thing. No one would even consider wearing underwear with their bathing suit. It would be wierd, it would show, people would wonder why you were intent on showing off the underwear - same with professional ballet training.

OTOH, even professional ballet is becoming much more competition oriented today. Check out Dance Magazine or Pointe. All the pre-professionals are entering competitions. I think it's a bit unfortunate in some ways. But it's also good opportunity to be seen by companies and to gain performance experience. It's done on a much more professional level than other dance competitions tho - not begun til a definite almost pro level usually.
post #70 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by MayBaby2007 View Post
(I saw this in new posts too). ITA with you, Marimara.

Since dd has been walking, several people have told me "She's going to be a dancer." "She's going to be a ballarina" (Because only my toddler likes to dance, you know ). On the defensive, I tell them, "She can be a dancer but no girl of mine will be a ballarina." That goes for any sport that shows off her body like it's nothing.

As a girl, I would have been completely-head-over-heels-suicidally-mortified if I wasn't *allowed* to wear panties and had to wear a skin tight outfit during my period (or skin tight at all).

I knew I didn't want dd to be a ballarina from day one. I didn't know it was this bad until reading this thread though. Yikes. This is one plea/argument dd will not win when she's older.
I've never heard anyone imply that ballet was MORE sexy than other forms of dance.

I am not sure why you have negative associations with ballet.
post #71 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ann-Marita View Post
What do young teens do for their periods during ballet class? Underwear isn't usually allowed.

I'm talking about teens that are not ready for tampons. The peel-n-stick pad won't work with tights. Or maybe they just don't use the "wings" that are supposed to wrap around underwear?

I tried to remember back when I was a young teen and in dance class (back in dinosaur days), and I had one of those old-fashioned belts that the pads' ends attached to. I don't think they sell those any more, or the pads with the long ends.

I'll probably encourage my dd to use cloth pads - I do myself. But even so, those pads wrap around the underwear and I just don't see them staying in place well with tights.

Thanks.
I took dance and was a swimmer. I wore tampons as a young teen.

I am sure some teachers might allow girls to wear skirts or underwear during their period. I guess I never really thought about it since I didn't have issues with tampons at that age.
post #72 of 77
I cant comment on the ballet part but I do know that for me wearing a tampon was impossible. I tried on many occasions in my teen years with many different brands and they would not go all the way up in there and by the time I got out of the stall they where falling out

I did have a tilted uterus (2 kids has fixed that) maybe that was what was wrong? I can now wear one with no trouble though I wont because they scare me I am to paranoid about TSS.

So what would a kid do who was like me when tampons just wont work.
post #73 of 77
Maybe a diva cup?
post #74 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by MayBaby2007 View Post

I knew I didn't want dd to be a ballarina from day one. I didn't know it was this bad until reading this thread though. Yikes. This is one plea/argument dd will not win when she's older.
I think this is an unfortunate attitude. Your daughter may be the next Anna Pavlova. Who knows? Children should be raised, in my opinion, to do what they love and love what they do. If it's something she loves and is passionate about, I think that as parents it's our duty to help them find a way to do it. At the end of the day - it's not about us.
post #75 of 77
Diva cup or some other collection cup is the way I would go.
post #76 of 77
OP: I was dancing and menstruating at 11. I used tampons, which one of the older girls at the studio showed me how to use. I'd ask the kid if she wants them and talk to an older dancer or teacher about what works.



I think the anti-ballet faction that seems to be forming needs to be aware that there are different kinds of ballet schools. There are place for your little girl to go and learn some grace and poise and get a good workout and look adorable in her recital tutu. There are also serious pre-professional schools that are focused on pushing the most dedicated and talented students to the peak of their ability. The target demographic for both sorts of schools is drastically different and if you fit one, you probably don't want to be anywhere near the other.

I attended the tough kind until it became apparent that I would never be tall enough or thin enough to be a serious dancer. They didn't throw me out, but I got a serious talk from my teacher about the fact that the other girls would be moving on to levels I would never achieve. I was 12. Brutal? Maybe, but honest and kinder than letting me sit and get passed over until I was discouraged enough to quit. I was in the wrong place. Had I attended the other ballet school in our city, I'd have been allowed to be a passing-good chubby dancer for as long as I wished.

I would recommend not ruling ballet out for a child who wants it (it has helped me in singing, acting, martial arts, job interviews...) but making sure instead that you are in the right school. They are night and day sometimes and while neither is *wrong* one or the other will generally be wrong *for you*.
post #77 of 77
I swam and danced through most of my chioldhood and teen years. I also got my first period at age 8, and started getting them regularly by age 9. I could not stand the bulk of pads, so early on I started using tampons- the slender sort.

Now I use instead or a diva cup as anything other than the slender tampons are uncomfortable, but the slim-fits don't work with my flow after having kids.

At any rate, I'd encourage her to learn about her options, and experiment with what works for her. I'd have wanted to die if I'd had no option but a pad when I was swimming or in a leotard. Even a pretty young child can use a tampon comfortably. If you let them experiment on their own, sometimes it helps to advise them to try a little KY on the applicator initially- certainly it isn't something I think about now and it's probably better with the smooth applicators, but my first experience involved a cardboard applicator and feeling like it was 'stuck'. The tampon itself was fine. I also discovered that the applicator free tampons worked really well for me as a teen.

I guess I'd just leave this to her and be a resource. I'd also stock her bathroom with slimfit tampons, applicator free tampons, instead, and some KY, as well as a couple varieties of pads. Sometimes girls don't ask for their options, but if they are there and available they will try them out.
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