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Just curious - was this odd? Babysitter question - Page 3

post #41 of 107
I would actually be more surprised if the 16 yr old babysitter DID NOT use the computer!!
post #42 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Debstmomy View Post
I would actually be more surprised if the 16 yr old babysitter DID NOT use the computer!!
Agreed 100%

I would not have any problem with it
post #43 of 107
I have a guest account set up on my computer and I've always let babysitters know that it's okay if they use it while the kids are asleep. I don't think I would have thought twice about it, really. If you don't want her using it you can mention it to her, though.
post #44 of 107
If it was visible from the hallway and you had made the babysitter feel welcome in other ways, then I would not find it odd for her to use the computer. It's like the TV or telephone - a source of entertainment or communication.

I was very cautious as a babysitter and wouldn't have used the TV or anything else without permission, but I can easily see how someone who has been told "Make yourself at home; help yourself to something from the fridge if you get hungry and give us a call if you need us!" would just think that includes the communal computer, too.
post #45 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by aniT View Post
I grew up without computers and I wouldn't think twice about it, IF the computer was left on, which many people I know do. If it was shutdown I wouldn't boot it up.
: I wouldn't turn one on, but I wouldn't have a problem using one that was already on.

I wouldn't be surprised in the slightest if someone used my computer while babysitting. I have everything 'private' locked.
post #46 of 107
I would never use someone else's computer without permission. Even when I was 16, I knew enough to ask first.

I'm very territorial so it would bother me.
post #47 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by aniT View Post
Umm I am married to a computer geek. We also used to own a computer repair shop, so I am intimately familiar with "computer geeks."

A computer and a purse are not comparable in my opinion. One is an electronic devices no different than a TV. The other carries your wallet which has financial numbers (re credit cards) in it. You should not have your financial information easily accessible on your computer anyway. Important/sensitive files should be password protected even on your own computer.

Maybe it's because I am used to people trusting us with their computers and it's contents, but I really don't see the big deal here.
I totally disagree. A computer contains a lot of personal information, unlike a TV. I don't consider that public property.

I think she should have asked to get on it, especially because it was in a guest bedroom. Why would she need to poke around other bedrooms? I wouldn't make a huge deal out of it, but I would ask her to ask permission next time.
post #48 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Debstmomy View Post
I would actually be more surprised if the 16 yr old babysitter DID NOT use the computer!!
no kidding!

just set up the guest account if you are worried about her snooping around.
post #49 of 107
I would NOT say anything to her about it-- back when I used to nanny/babysit, every family told me I could use it, and if a family didn't tell me I would have just assumed I could considering I've never worked for anyone before who would care. I don't see it as any different from a phone or tv after the child is asleep.

If you're willing to let guests use it after clearing it off, then it doesn't seem like that big of a deal just to clear it off. I also wouldn't be looking at her browser history-- I wouldn't care what she was looking at.
post #50 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by aniT View Post
Umm I am married to a computer geek. We also used to own a computer repair shop, so I am intimately familiar with "computer geeks."

A computer and a purse are not comparable in my opinion. One is an electronic devices no different than a TV. The other carries your wallet which has financial numbers (re credit cards) in it. You should not have your financial information easily accessible on your computer anyway. Important/sensitive files should be password protected even on your own computer.

Maybe it's because I am used to people trusting us with their computers and it's contents, but I really don't see the big deal here.
But people do keep very personal things on their computer. Journals, access to private support boards like the Abuse forum here, personal creative works like stories or poetry, the odd private photograph just for hubby you took with the digital camera cause you weren't gonna take it into the store to be developed...

You're used to people trusting you and DH with their computers, but understand that for many of those people it is huge trust they are putting on you because of an expectation of professionalism. My computer geek friends never take their computer in unless absolutely nessecary because to then, it is as personal as a purse or wallet.
post #51 of 107
I hate it when people help themselves to my computer. However, I have to acknowledge that there's some generation gap involved here. I've watched ds1 and his friends, and they think no more of using someone else's computer than of turning on someone else's tv...maybe less. He has one friend who has scooped the computer when I get up to get a drink of water - turn around and he's on my log in, looking for something on youtube. DS1 thinks I'm weird or hopelessly old-fashioned or something.
post #52 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laggie View Post
I think that, to her generation, it's no different than watching your TV. At our house, you can only get into the "guest" account without a password - I think that's pretty typical for most people, and she may have been surprised that your computer isn't set up that way... Meaning, most people's personal data, bookmarks etc. aren't easily accessible ime.

If it was in the master bedroom, I might find it weird. But a guest room/office... unless she was told to stay out, wouldn't seem like an off-limits area to me.
We do that as well. FIL & his wife stayed and watched the kids when we flew to Denver to look for a home & I set up the guest account for them & the kids. I love & trust my IL's, it's just "normal" for me.
post #53 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post
But people do keep very personal things on their computer. Journals, access to private support boards like the Abuse forum here, personal creative works like stories or poetry, the odd private photograph just for hubby you took with the digital camera cause you weren't gonna take it into the store to be developed...

You're used to people trusting you and DH with their computers, but understand that for many of those people it is huge trust they are putting on you because of an expectation of professionalism. My computer geek friends never take their computer in unless absolutely nessecary because to then, it is as personal as a purse or wallet.
yes. but.......i don't think that a 16 year old is thinking that there are personal info/financial records/what have you on there. she's 16. i'm sure she was thinking ok kids asleep i have some stuff to do, and if she wasn't startled when she came in so she knows she wasn't doing anything wrong. she probably has no idea how personal a computer can be for some people. they're in her school, she probably has one at home. no biggie. if you're worried about it-just set up a guest acct. but i wouldn't mention it to her. if i was her i would say bye bye and wouldn't return to watch your son. i wasn't 16 that long ago.
post #54 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post
Would you look through someones purse if it was left open?

For people in my generation it's pretty close to the same thing.
Which generation is that? I was born in 1973. To me, my computer is more like... like a car, if I was one of those people who fixes my own car and has installed aftermarket cool bits to it.

Granted, I wouldn't expect someone to borrow my car without explicit permission, but there's the whole licensing issue there. They're not going to crash my computer. (Really, they're not... that's what Linux is for. )

Quote:
Computers have become a very personal thing. I know people who would physically correct you if you so much as touched their computer without permission for the same reason they would physically remove their purse or wallet from your hands if you picked it up without permission.

Then again, it might be my exposure to computer geeks. They are probably much more territorial about their computers then the average person.
I build my own computers. People mention on this thread about "computer geeks" who don't take their computers "in" unless it's absolutely necessary... I don't understand what this "taking in" is all about. If something goes wrong, you diagnose it and order a new part on Newegg, don't you? *That's* a computer geek in my little world.

But... my computer really isn't all that personal. I mean, ok, if you go into my bookmarks, and you go to Mothering, I'm logged in, so you can see my posts. I posted them PUBLICLY ON THE INTERNET though.

If you go to Amazon, you know what they think I should buy, but you can't actually use my account unless you know my password. (It'll tell you my login, though... oh noes!)

My mom has a huge text file with all kinds of stuff, including credit card numbers that she's obfuscated so they wouldn't come up on a regular expression search, but I carry that stuff in my head. It's not on my computer. Stuff I've written is... and if you REALLY wanted to find it, you probably could, but it would take a while, because I even have trouble finding it. There's a ton of stuff there.

If someone who I don't trust is going to have unsupervised access to my home for a while, I would shut down my computer (can't boot it up without my password). But if someone I don't trust is going to have unsupervised access to my home for a while, I already screwed up.

In general, I trust people not to snoop. I'll set them up with a web browser and assume they won't go poking around, just as I would point them to the bathroom and wouldn't expect them to search my nightstand in the bedroom. Makes sense to me.
post #55 of 107
I've never hired a sitter, so I'm not sure I can really speak from that perspective... I personally can't imagine using someone else's computer when they weren't home. I would only ask to use a computer if we were in the room with one or I was offering to pull something up for them.

DH and I have had this conversation a million times about guests at our house. Because I get on the computer in little bits of time throughout the day(s), my personal account is ALWAYS opened, generally with multiple open windows. My account is password protected, but I NEVER log out. My money files are password protected, but when paying bills I might be logged in for several days running. Also, our study is a MESS of things that need to be filed. I often have bills waiting to be paid and such sitting in easy view of the seat at the computer. I consider the computer and the desk (and honestly the study at large) my personal space. I have no issue with DH using it, and DD is only 2.5.

I have FINALLY gotten it into DH's head that he can't just tell guests, "Sure, our computer is right in there" He will now go log out of my account and set someone up on the guest account. However, I'm still working on getting him to think about what papers are clearly visible. We had an over night guest a few weeks ago, who I had NO expectation of having on our computer (honestly, I assumed she'd bring a laptop...) DH set her up on our computer while I was still asleep. I was in the middle of filing our taxes and ALL of our tax forms were laid out in front of the computer. I felt INCREDIBLY violated (by DH not so much by the guest).
post #56 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironica View Post
Which generation is that? I was born in 1973. To me, my computer is more like... like a car, if I was one of those people who fixes my own car and has installed aftermarket cool bits to it.

Granted, I wouldn't expect someone to borrow my car without explicit permission, but there's the whole licensing issue there. They're not going to crash my computer. (Really, they're not... that's what Linux is for. )



I build my own computers. People mention on this thread about "computer geeks" who don't take their computers "in" unless it's absolutely necessary... I don't understand what this "taking in" is all about. If something goes wrong, you diagnose it and order a new part on Newegg, don't you? *That's* a computer geek in my little world.

But... my computer really isn't all that personal. I mean, ok, if you go into my bookmarks, and you go to Mothering, I'm logged in, so you can see my posts. I posted them PUBLICLY ON THE INTERNET though.

If you go to Amazon, you know what they think I should buy, but you can't actually use my account unless you know my password. (It'll tell you my login, though... oh noes!)

My mom has a huge text file with all kinds of stuff, including credit card numbers that she's obfuscated so they wouldn't come up on a regular expression search, but I carry that stuff in my head. It's not on my computer. Stuff I've written is... and if you REALLY wanted to find it, you probably could, but it would take a while, because I even have trouble finding it. There's a ton of stuff there.

If someone who I don't trust is going to have unsupervised access to my home for a while, I would shut down my computer (can't boot it up without my password). But if someone I don't trust is going to have unsupervised access to my home for a while, I already screwed up.

In general, I trust people not to snoop. I'll set them up with a web browser and assume they won't go poking around, just as I would point them to the bathroom and wouldn't expect them to search my nightstand in the bedroom. Makes sense to me.
I was born in the early 80's.

"Take it in" means you know that what is wrong can be fixed without replacing hardware but don't know how or aren't able to do it yourself. My understanding is that the replacement method of computer repair is the more expensive method of computer repair. Fine if your willing to replace parts to fix a problem, but the computer geeks I know would rather not just replace a part if they know it can be fixed.
post #57 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by jess_paez View Post
yes. but.......i don't think that a 16 year old is thinking that there are personal info/financial records/what have you on there. she's 16. i'm sure she was thinking ok kids asleep i have some stuff to do, and if she wasn't startled when she came in so she knows she wasn't doing anything wrong. she probably has no idea how personal a computer can be for some people. they're in her school, she probably has one at home. no biggie. if you're worried about it-just set up a guest acct. but i wouldn't mention it to her. if i was her i would say bye bye and wouldn't return to watch your son. i wasn't 16 that long ago.
Uh, 16 doesn't mean stuck in ones own little world. If a 16 yo is going to say "byebye" and not return because I ask her to respect what I perceeve as private space then I probably don't want her in my house alone with only my kids anyway.
post #58 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post
"Take it in" means you know that what is wrong can be fixed without replacing hardware but don't know how or aren't able to do it yourself. My understanding is that the replacement method of computer repair is the more expensive method of computer repair. Fine if your willing to replace parts to fix a problem, but the computer geeks I know would rather not just replace a part if they know it can be fixed.
I can't imagine paying less to repair a part in my computer than to replace it. The motherboard is the only thing that costs more than $100. The optical drive is somewhat mechanical, and as such, could be repaired with a small enough screwdriver and the right know-how... but I could get a brand-new one for $25, so I don't see the point. I remember back in 1994 when my boyfriend (now my ex-husband) repaired an ISA card with a soldering iron and a scrap of a paperclip, but things are far more miniaturized now, so doing that sort of thing outside a laboratory isn't really feasible. If your RAM goes bad, you need a new stick, and that's that.
post #59 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post
My computer geek friends never take their computer in unless absolutely nessecary because to then, it is as personal as a purse or wallet.
I think you may be mistaken about your friends' motivations here. I am a minor geek, married to a major geek. We don't "take our computers in" unless absolutely necessary because it separates us from our beloved machines. (Oh noes!)

It isn't that they are such desperately personal items; it's that we use them often and don't like to be without them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post
"Take it in" means you know that what is wrong can be fixed without replacing hardware but don't know how or aren't able to do it yourself. My understanding is that the replacement method of computer repair is the more expensive method of computer repair. Fine if your willing to replace parts to fix a problem, but the computer geeks I know would rather not just replace a part if they know it can be fixed.
Not if you're replacing it yourself. The expensive part of computer repair is typically the labour, not the parts. Parts are cheap these days; geeks are not. (Though that may change if a lot of IT people get laid off in the next year or so.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironica View Post
I can't imagine paying less to repair a part in my computer than to replace it.
:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironica View Post
In general, I trust people not to snoop. I'll set them up with a web browser and assume they won't go poking around, just as I would point them to the bathroom and wouldn't expect them to search my nightstand in the bedroom. Makes sense to me.
:
post #60 of 107
I quoted too many things so I will just say, I agree with Ironica. A true computer geek doens't take his computer in because he knows how to fix it himself. I mean seriously, If it's a part, you replace it, if it is a software problem, and you are REALLY a computer geek, you google it.

I can't imagine any computer geek with his/her salt taking his/her computer into a repair shop. IF you are lucky you will find someone who knows what he/she is doing.. but more often than not... the repair person is just going to reinstall windows cause they don't have a clue how to fix it either. (we get so many calls from pissed off geek squad customers.)
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