or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Women's Health  › Natural Body Care › Biracial haircare
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Biracial haircare

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
good morning:

my daughter just turned 3 and has beautiful "kinky" hair. (i am white with streight hair and my boyfriend is black with "kinky" hair)

i am washing the hair every month with natural shampoo (for info see: http://tienda.fitobelleza.com/epages...jectID=3491272 ) and rinse it with vinegar.

still, her hair is frizzy and dry at the ends maybe it would be better to use more products to her hair?

lately i tried a self-mix of pure jojoba oil, curdled milk and hazel water (all organic). it worked well in order to comb through her hair but the ends were still dry.

do you have any advice on natural haircare or product recommondations?

and does anyone know a good website showing how to make cornrows? i just dont get it.
post #2 of 8
My cousin's kids are biracial (black/white), too... but even though they are full brother/sister, their hair is really different from one another's. Her DS's is sort of like a tight, S-shaped wave, and her DD's is more like a spring- not just a curl, but a coil, if you know what I mean. So she has had to play around to find stuff that works for both of them. I know she puts coconut oil on the ends of her DD's hair.

She also washes their hair less than what she used to- once or twice a week- and that's helped, too.

Oh, and I don't know if this helps you, but a cornrow is just an inside out french braid. Instead of drawing the new hair in on top of the braid, you draw it in underneath the braid. Cornrows themselves aren't hard, its getting them t i g h t e n o u g h that's hard.
post #3 of 8
I'm biracial, and though my hair isn't really kinky (very curly though) it is very very dry. Have you tried dropping the shampoo all together? I almost never use shampoo, just conditioner. Massage the conditioner into the scalp just like you would shampoo and then leave awhile, detangle and rinse. That's it. Every now and then I feel like I have some buildup from all the moisturizer, so I'll shampoo or use a baking soda rinse.

I've recently discovered Weleda Rosemary oil and absolutely love it, but it's pricey. My mom said she used to put henna in my hair when I was a kid to deep condition. Basically you just can't moisturize enough. I think a diet full of good fats has improved my hair too, but other that, I have just let go of the thought that I will ever have anything but dry hair.
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leta View Post
Oh, and I don't know if this helps you, but a cornrow is just an inside out french braid. Instead of drawing the new hair in on top of the braid, you draw it in underneath the braid. Cornrows themselves aren't hard, its getting them t i g h t e n o u g h that's hard.
thank you for the explanation. i cant wait to finally try cornrows on my little one's hair (i havent got the gutts yet, since she doesnt like to get her hair done).
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaleidoscopeeyes View Post
Have you tried dropping the shampoo all together? I almost never use shampoo, just conditioner.

I've recently discovered Weleda Rosemary oil and absolutely love it, but it's pricey.
hey, i may try the conditioner instead of shampoo (until now i only use vinegar as a conditioner).

and weleda is a germany company, its actually not so expensive here in germany, so i may try that one too.

BTW, i love your signature
post #6 of 8
My kids are also biracial. With the boys, I didn't have to anything different w/ their hair than I did w/ my own. Baby DD is another story. Her hair is so long. She's not even 9 months and if I pull one of her little corkscrews, it's probably about 4 inches.

I'm only having difficulties w/ the back of her hair. It seems like a different texture. I don't know if that will change as she starts not laying on her back so much.

We use occasional shampoo (Burt's Bees), usually we wash w/ conditioner (Aubrey White Camellia) w/ a quick rinse. I made a spray of distilled water, conditioner, and vegetable glycerin, for days when we don't wash. That works great for all the kids' hair, but it doesn't work well for the back part of DD's. I rub jojoba oil, rose hip seed oil, and shea butter on the back. It still tangles. I figure one of these days we'll get it worked out.

Oh and I also have her sleep on a satin blanket. I've heard that cotton will draw the moisture from hair.
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by whooopsy View Post
hey, i may try the conditioner instead of shampoo (until now i only use vinegar as a conditioner).

and weleda is a germany company, its actually not so expensive here in germany, so i may try that one too.

BTW, i love your signature
Thanks

You're very lucky with the Weleda being cheaper there. I love their products! If you're only using vinegar, more conditioning is probably in order. There is a really great book called Curly Girl that I always recommend to people trying to understand their kids curly-kinky hair. It's definitely a different ballgame. She includes quit a few recipes for rinses and conditioners too.
post #8 of 8

Ok,

so I am just registering with this site and saw your post from 2009.

Still having problems with your daughter's hair?

I applaud you for reaching out for help.

If I may, share with you what has worked for me?

I am of mixed race heritage-my mother is hungarian and my father is black and indian.

While I am not the expert on black hair- no one is..people are just too diverse and hair textures vary from gene to gene.

It's not the type of of shampoo you use...I go between Pantene, Suave Naturals (99cents at the store) and Loreal's Garnier...

The important thing is what you are doing to condition her hair.

Are you applying heat or trying to let her wear it natural?

Due to her age ( I hope you haven't put a perm in her hair w/out 1) watching Chris Rock's Good Hair and 2) waiting until she turns 15).

Find a good leave in conditioner to apply after she shampoos and conditions her hair in the shower.

When combing the leave in conditioner through (never brush wet hair) hold her hair at the base (closest to the scalp) and begin combing out the ends then move down the hair shaft.

AT night, either braid her hair or wrap it to prepare it for tomorrow and to protect the ends.

 

That's it.

Also if I may:

 

Being of mixed race heritage can I suggest that no matter what you do and no matter how much you love, do not pretend not to see color.  Whatever the race and ethnicity of your child, please please please see and celebrate their color and culture.

If you have questions, ask someone who can identify with the child.

If the child can't see you in them, please please please find a supportive loving role model for your child.

Empower them and celebrate every single one of their differences so they can learn to grow and accept all of the love you have to give. 

In love only

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Natural Body Care
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Women's Health  › Natural Body Care › Biracial haircare