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Looking for Birth Center/Midwife-Friendly Options in Bucks County Area - Page 2

post #21 of 31

Great post, although I'm sorry that it seems like you had a bad experience.  I think it's also important to point out that while c sections are common in the US, it really depends on the Dr.  My gut told me, by the way he talked about it, that Dinesen would be quick to perform a c section.  And I know he doesn't perform VBACs while other Drs do.  My mom delivered my twin brothers at Abingotn and everyone was worried at one point because one of them hadn't turned to face the way he needed to for delivery, and her Dr said "don't you worry, if I have to go up there and turn him around myself I will".  This was one of the scenarios that Dinesen pointed out we would need a C section for - all depends on the Dr.

 

Also, I did meet with the Midwives at Doylestown and they do use Dinesen as their back up. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wjey View Post




As another poster said, Dinesen's c-section rate is around 30%, which is normal only in the United States and those "typical responses" are only typical here, as well.  The rate is so high if you look at worldwide statistics.  C-sections are WAY overused here and Dinesen goes with the flow, unfortunately.  Please, please, please research this before you let yourself be conned into believing that you'll only have to have a c-section if you really need it.  Most of the reasons given for "needing" a c-section can be overcome (and they are in areas where c-sections are not so normalized).  Once you have that first c-section, you'll often be told that you'll have to have one for all of your other babies, as well (also not true!).  I'm hoping that I'm not coming across too mean, here, but I wish I knew before I had my son with Dinesen what I do now and I'm just hoping that I can help somebody else avoid the pain (physical and emotional) that I had as a result of having my c-section.  Last I checked, Dinesen is the emergency surgeon for Doylestown Midwifery, so he's still there in that capacity, if you were to switch. 

 



 

post #22 of 31
Yell


How was your meeting with Doylestown Midwifery ? Any first impressions and are you planning to switch over ?
post #23 of 31

I'm not using them.  They have 2 midwives there and one of them has only been catching for a year, which makes me uneasy.  But they seemed fine if that's not a concern to you.

post #24 of 31

The Midwives were very conforting.  It's hard to explain, but I'll do my best.  I never felt rushed with them, I felt that I was in good hands, they are extremely educated, Graduates of University of Pennsylvania.  The staff was friendly, it's kind of like "Cheers" where everyone knows your name, it was a nice, relaxing environment, not so clinical in the sense that it's all about the $, they listened to me, they got to know me and my family and also worked with my outrageous birthplan. Good luck!

post #25 of 31

I'm currently at Dinesen and I'm not liking it. I have an appointment at Doylestown Midwifery on April 12 so hoping to get a better feeling from them. 

 

I am about 9 weeks along at the moment, and I'm trying to do all natural no meds/IV/constant fetal monitoring. I know they deliver at Doylestown Hospital so I have a lot of questions for them about that.

 

Thanks everyone for all the info on this board, it's been helpful for me. Any additional info would be great as well (some of it was a little dated).

post #26 of 31

Manda, good luck with the midwives.  If you don't like Dinesen now, it's not going to get any better for you.  It's pretty much a show-up-at-the-hospital-and-let-the-nurses-tell-you-what-to-do kind of birth with him.  The nurses are pretty nice at D'town, but if that's not the birth you want, you're going to want the guidance of a midwife to prepare and empower you.

post #27 of 31

 

 

I want to share the following review my husband wrote after our experience with The Birth Center in Bryn Mawr, PA. It's long, but we felt it necessary to share what happened to us!

 

 

It was all good until it wasn't.
 
Just like that. Everything seemed pretty much as described in the great reviews of their practice all over the internet, and following the procedures they explained to us in the two-hour orientation session. Perhaps the only bad note was the constant rotation of midwives, since they have quite a big practice. But I believed we liked everyone we met in the months we spent with them.
 
In week 18th we noticed a small protuberance (ping pong size) in Natasha's belly. We thought it was the baby but a midwife identified it as a fibroid. She also explain that fibroids are very common and normally don't represent a problem. We were advised to perform an (otherwise unwanted) ultrasound just for safety. The results were as expected; our baby was fine and the fibroid was small and out of the way of an eventual vaginal delivery. No other fibroids that may have been present were big enough to be detected in the ultrasound. We needed to keep an eye on it but as far as fibroids go they don't come much easier.
 
We kept going to our appointments, exams and controls, with TBC staff always reassuring us about the development of the pregnancy. Natasha was happy with the idea of having our first baby there, I was already acquainted with the idea of hanging the "it's a girl" flag from the window and even my mom visiting from Chile had toured TBC's facility. In week 28th Natasha received a phone call. One of the midwives told her that after a medical meeting where our case was discussed they didn't feel comfortable with receiving our baby at TBC, and that we should look for an alternative.
 
The shock was big. Seven months into our pregnancy we were not prepared for the stress of having to look for a new practice from the scratch, and we didn't know if would even be admitted in a different birth facility (I'm not sure if even TBC doesn't accept mothers so far into pregnancy). 
After a week of disconcert, we sent them an email requesting an explanation on the  whole situation and the procedure, asking why we were not included in the decision-making process, why they were not providing any help with a back-up plan, if we were technically considered now a high-risk pregnancy, and all the doubts that arose from this abrupt termination. We also requested a meeting to discuss what happened face to face and to have some kind of closure. Clinical director Peggy Stone apologized to my wife on the phone and helped us getting an appointment for another ultrasound. She left a long message on my voice mail saying she would be available to talk on the phone but didn't have time to meet with us. After that TBC staff was very diligent in helping us transfer our records to our new providers, and that was about it.
 
I am not arguing the medical decision. I'm not trained for it and I would not want anybody taking any chances with my wife's or daughter's lives. Still is hard to understand how can a decision like that take 10 weeks to make with nothing changing in the patient. My frustration is about the breaking of the contract established at the beginning of the pregnancy. I am talking  about the spirit - and the actual wording - of the agreement between us and TBC. They are all against the alienation of modern medicine and about integrating the families into the decision, still they did everything without us. They emphasize the importance of the partner for the pregnancy (husband or otherwise) but they never communicated with us about this as a family. We never received any written report about what happened, how the decision was made, and what exactly meant for Natasha's and the baby's health. They didn't have any kind of back-up system in place even though in all their communications (written and verbal) the understanding is that you will be transfered into Bryn Mawr's Hospital if something goes beyond their parameters of safety. Finally, and from a human point of view, we were really hurt they would not make the time to receive us, to help us with the transition and the frustration of this abrupt decision way into our third trimester. Emails and phone messages are wonderful tools of the digital era but I believe they are not the proper ones to handle situations like the one I am describing. 
 
I believe that their delayed response to the fibroid is something that can happen. It may have been a difficult call discerning safety from risk, and in that matter better later than never. What is really disappointing is their reaction once we were informed even though we communicated with them very specifically about our needs and concerns. And I think their communication practices need deep examination.
 

 

post #28 of 31

Im with Dr. Dinesen now and delivered at Doylestown hospital with my first.  She was breech and I didn't have many options.  My experience with Doylestown hospital was amazing and I would go back there in a heartbeat if I didn't want to try for a VBAC.  I have a consult appointment with Valley Birthplace but know nothing about the new Einstein Medical Hospital in Montgomery.  I know they are VBAC friendly, but if I have to have another C, I do not know any of the doctors there as a surgeon.  I don't really know what to do, pick comfort and safety of what you know, or try for the unknown and hope it goes well? Anyone know anywhere else that allows VBACs and have high success rates?  Also, is there a way they can tell if your a good candidate or not?  Thanks!

post #29 of 31

The best way to know if you're a good candidate is to go and talk to alot of midwives (or a select few that you know are VBAC friendly).  Do you have a reason to suspect that you wouldn't be a good candidate?  It is a rare circumstance that would be prohibitive for a good midwife.  I had obstetrical opinions telling me that I was a bad candidate and that it was risky and dangerous, but had three great midwifery practices willing to give me a chance.  And now I've had two VBACs without incident.  My second was supposed to be with Valley Birthplace, but the baby came too quickly and we had to go to Grandview (where I conscientiously objected to answering the question about having previous surgery).

post #30 of 31

Oh wow!!!  No, not particularly I guess.  My biggest fear is to labor for hours only to get a c-section anyway, in an unfamiliar hospital with an unfamiliar surgeon.  After laboring, it would be like an "emergency" and probably a double whammy as far as recovery goes.  I guess I was wondering if there were baby size restrictions, if someone could assess my pelvic opening to determine if it would "open" wide enough...

 

As much as I rejected the c-section with my first.  I had to surrender that with breech, I didn't really have a choice I was comfortable with.  The c-section was easy because it was scheduled and I could prepare.  So, I am looking for good information so I can make an informed decision.  Valley Birthplace delivers now at Einstein Medical in Montgomery.   I know nothing about that hospital, so I want to check them out.  Too bad Doylestown isn't so VBAC friendly.  I feel like if VBAC is my choice, choosing Doylestown Hospital is setting myself up for failure.

 

How come women stop dilating?  

post #31 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrwinter2 View Post

Oh wow!!!  No, not particularly I guess.  My biggest fear is to labor for hours only to get a c-section anyway, in an unfamiliar hospital with an unfamiliar surgeon.  After laboring, it would be like an "emergency" and probably a double whammy as far as recovery goes.  I guess I was wondering if there were baby size restrictions, if someone could assess my pelvic opening to determine if it would "open" wide enough...

 

As much as I rejected the c-section with my first.  I had to surrender that with breech, I didn't really have a choice I was comfortable with.  The c-section was easy because it was scheduled and I could prepare.  So, I am looking for good information so I can make an informed decision.  Valley Birthplace delivers now at Einstein Medical in Montgomery.   I know nothing about that hospital, so I want to check them out.  Too bad Doylestown isn't so VBAC friendly.  I feel like if VBAC is my choice, choosing Doylestown Hospital is setting myself up for failure.

 

How come women stop dilating?  

I, Irwinter2.  I see you joined a while ago but don't post much.  Glad you feel like you can come here to ask questions!

 

Are you familiar w/ ICAN?  It's the International Cesarean Awareness Network.  Here's their website: http://www.ican-online.org/  You are likely to find a lot of information on their site from women who've been in your shoes.  They can also help you to understand why c-sections happen & what you can do to prevent having another one.

 

Also, the birth & beyond section here at MDC has a section on VBAC & healing birth trauma.  You may find more that is helpful there.

 

I'll answer some of your specific questions, but because it's from information I've gathered since before having my first child in 2002, I don't have specific sources to site.  

 

On baby size restrictions: the tools that are typically used to decide this (ultrasound) are notoriously inaccurate for this purpose.  So often you hear of a mom having a scheduled c-section because the baby is too big & ends up being an average weight (which is 7-9 lbs), or less.  Not good stuff.  

 

On the pelvic opening: often times, women are expected to labor on their backs, laying in bed, being still.  When a woman is allowed to move as her body tells her, she can work w/ the labor to move & allow her pelvis to open.  I recall reading something about the pelvis opening but can't recall exactly what but it was something that made me think, wow, that's like magic!  The pelvis is supposed to be able to open when the baby is ready, that's why we produce the hormones (I think it's hormones) that relax our ligaments w/in our bodies while we're pregnant.  

 

On Doylestown Hospital - I'd recommend you steer clear of them.  I had a friend back in 2006 who was wanting to push as they were prepping her for her repeat cesarean.  She did not want the first or second c-section but was at their mercy.  The claim generally is no vbacs because what if something goes wrong, they need to have emergency care available right away.  Here's this woman that they are stopping from having her baby so they can cut her open.  This proves that the main stated reason for no vbacs is hogwash.

 

How come women stop dilating?  Generally, I'd say, fear.  I know that's what happened when I was in labor w/ my first.  That's what happens w/ animals also - they will stop laboring when there is a danger present.  I went into labor at about 12:30am.  Labored for 3 hours.  Figured things were moving along pretty well (I'd studied hypnobirthing so I wasn't uncomfortable) so we started getting ready to go to the hospital.  It stalled.  Contractions became sporadic.  Here & there.  Not much happening.  Once I went to my midwife (the midwives who practice out of Doylestown, which I thought at the time having a midwife in the hospital was a good compromise between dh & myself - I was wrong).  Because I believe hospitals are for sick people & really wanted a homebirth (dh didn't at the time, now he's all for it), I thought I'd be safe w/ a midwife.  I believe some midwives can work w/in the hospital model w/o compromising generally on what moms want, but the Doyelstown midwives didn't fit that bill.  I imagine there are other reasons a mother will stop laboring, but I'm sharing my experience w/ you.  

 

Best wishes,

Sus

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