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Stereotypes--when do you speak up? - Page 2

post #21 of 26
Last night I spoke up against racist stereotypes I nearly got into a fist fight! I suppose if I feel strongly enough I will tell someone to shut their trap. And go back to where THEY came from. I hate sharing the world with stupid people!
post #22 of 26
OP are you referring to the webkinz thread? I'm just wondering because it sounds like the game on there with Pancho and the pinatas?

Anyways, I guess for our MCF we just point it out and let it go. My kids are biracial and we just notice that stuff and say well, that must be a happy pinata loving puppy. Not that it means anything per se.

I guess to me there's a difference between generalization and stereotype. To me, a stereotype means that people are using a generalization to paint a negative picture. A generalization is more of just a commonality. Now...if the pinata loving puppy was depicted as LAZY or IGNORANT....now THAT would tick me the heck off. Same for Asian themed stuff. If it's just a generalization that's fine, but a prejudicial stereotype...that's offensive.

Just my two cents...
post #23 of 26
I'll speak up if it appears to me that the person doesn't realize they're stereotyping (it happens, usually people who've had a sheltered life). People who I think should know better though I ignore and then avoid. I'm not going to waste my time trying to educate them on something they're not interested in. They're not being ignorant they're just being hateful. Some people seem to need a group of people to badmouth and look down on in order for themselves to appear better. Somewhere inside I'm pretty sure they already know what they say is not true but they don't care. Their blathering on seems to be their attempt to convince themselves 'those' people are really that bad. I've found it's a waste of my energy to even start with them.
post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Theoretica View Post
OP are you referring to the webkinz thread? I'm just wondering because it sounds like the game on there with Pancho and the pinatas?

Anyways, I guess for our MCF we just point it out and let it go. My kids are biracial and we just notice that stuff and say well, that must be a happy pinata loving puppy. Not that it means anything per se.

I guess to me there's a difference between generalization and stereotype. To me, a stereotype means that people are using a generalization to paint a negative picture. A generalization is more of just a commonality. Now...if the pinata loving puppy was depicted as LAZY or IGNORANT....now THAT would tick me the heck off. Same for Asian themed stuff. If it's just a generalization that's fine, but a prejudicial stereotype...that's offensive.

Just my two cents...
The webkinz game was only one of the recent games that I've noticed. There have been a few others that use the same stereotypes. And they are stereotypes. The thing that pushed that one into the truly offensive zone was the accent. What if it was a little Asian guy, running around trying to spear eggrolls with his chopsticks, with an exaggerated stereotypical Asian accent? Or a Black character chasing fried chicken and chitlins, talking in dialect?

I know this particular game seems harmless and I know my observation on that thread pissed off some people because it disrupted their fluff, but you really don't know how much your child has absorbed, often until it comes out at the wrong time, around the wrong people.

We seem to have a much higher tolerance level of ignorance and bigotry when it is related to Mexicans. I think that comes from the level of accepted, blatant bigotry toward Mexicans and other Latinos here in the US--some of which has seeped into state and local laws.

Being truly anti-racist means being aware of bigotry wherever it appears and saying something about it, even if it's inconvenient or seemingly harmless. Sometimes the measure of harm comes too late.



Quote:
Originally Posted by wednesday2004 View Post
I'll speak up if it appears to me that the person doesn't realize they're stereotyping (it happens, usually people who've had a sheltered life). People who I think should know better though I ignore and then avoid. I'm not going to waste my time trying to educate them on something they're not interested in. They're not being ignorant they're just being hateful. Some people seem to need a group of people to badmouth and look down on in order for themselves to appear better. Somewhere inside I'm pretty sure they already know what they say is not true but they don't care. Their blathering on seems to be their attempt to convince themselves 'those' people are really that bad. I've found it's a waste of my energy to even start with them.
I would agree with you unless others were around to hear it as well. Especially children.
post #25 of 26
I personally haven't encountered the hispanic stereotypes lately, beyond the ones based out of a complete lack of exposure. All Mexicans like spicy food, all Latinos have dark skin, are Catholic etc. The plain out racist bigotry.. well luckily I've been away from that for the last couple years too.
I entirely get what you mean though. Like the "Atlanta Braves" mascot. Pretty much everyone seems to think those being offended are "too sensitive"... but if the mascot was a "little black sambo" character and the team was called the Atlanta n#$^&s" the outcry would be horrible.
People I talk too don't understand why generic "Indian"halloween costumes and fakey looking tipis bother me. Somebody tell me which tribe makes neon pink "medicine bags" with fake feathers!
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by wednesday2004 View Post
I'll speak up if it appears to me that the person doesn't realize they're stereotyping (it happens, usually people who've had a sheltered life). People who I think should know better though I ignore and then avoid. I'm not going to waste my time trying to educate them on something they're not interested in. They're not being ignorant they're just being hateful. Some people seem to need a group of people to badmouth and look down on in order for themselves to appear better. Somewhere inside I'm pretty sure they already know what they say is not true but they don't care. Their blathering on seems to be their attempt to convince themselves 'those' people are really that bad. I've found it's a waste of my energy to even start with them.
:

I used to work with a guy who I think was raised by his grandparents. There were things that he said that I was a bit shocked that a 20something would say! I think it was just the cultural difference between grandparents day and today.
I would keep it short like and polite, like "Do you mean a clef palette?" (he was really bad about 'mocking' disabilities) Most of the time he would realize what he was saying probably wasn't the best way to say it!

My racist father however, I just stare at like he has three heads. Dad's variety of racism makes me angry. My coworkers variety just makes me uncomfortable.
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