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anyone use classical curriculum?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I looked in the curriculum reviews, but couldn't find anything on classical curriculum. We are searching for books for ds - he is about 4, but on an above-kindergarten level, and I live in an aggressive town that monitors us hsers closely. I want to find a formal curriculum, and follow it loosely but have it as backup for the nosy school district. I have been impressed reading about classical ed, think it would work well for ds's learning style, but would like to hear real people experience. Any thoughts? Thanks!
post #2 of 22
I have not started yet, but I plan on using Tapestry of Grace. It is classical mixed with unit study. It looks great and you can teach children of different levels together. It is Christain; not sure if that would interest you....
post #3 of 22
We are just getting started with hs'ing our almost 4yo and plan to follow a more classical approach as well. Have you read The Well-Trained Mind? I highly recommend reading it as there is a wealth of information in it regarding the classical approach. It basically outlines the structure of a classical approach and recommends several different curriculum for various subjects at each grade level. Then within those subjects, you can look up the reviews online for the suggested curriculum.
post #4 of 22
Doesn't Charlotte Mason use the classical approach? I don't remember for sure but you might google it or look at Ambleside Online.
post #5 of 22
We are "classical" homeschoolers. The quotes are because the curriculum looks great and intense on paper, but in real life it's much more relaxed and hands on. The writing intensive part of the classical trivium didn't appeal to us very much. The kid is a hands on learner, so we've adapted.

I will second the read of the Well Trained Mind, and I suggest looking over Montessori websites to find supplements. We've amassed a pretty good collection of tools to help the kid still understand the order of life but without the emphasis on date memorization and rote work.

Right now we use a few different base items:

Math U See
Story Of The World (also written by the author of the Well Trained Mind)
Noeo science (Christian company but written to be secular)
Writing Strands (not really classical in nature, but it works for us)
Latin's Not So Tough!
and a collection of Newberry winners and classics for reading together.

I guess when it comes down to it we're more eclectic, but we do follow the classical order for the most part.
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by LilyGrace View Post
We are "classical" homeschoolers. The quotes are because the curriculum looks great and intense on paper, but in real life it's much more relaxed and hands on. The writing intensive part of the classical trivium didn't appeal to us very much. The kid is a hands on learner, so we've adapted.

I will second the read of the Well Trained Mind, and I suggest looking over Montessori websites to find supplements. We've amassed a pretty good collection of tools to help the kid still understand the order of life but without the emphasis on date memorization and rote work.

Right now we use a few different base items:

Math U See
Story Of The World (also written by the author of the Well Trained Mind)
Noeo science (Christian company but written to be secular)
Writing Strands (not really classical in nature, but it works for us)
Latin's Not So Tough!
and a collection of Newberry winners and classics for reading together.

I guess when it comes down to it we're more eclectic, but we do follow the classical order for the most part.
What makes a writting plan "Classical" or "not"

also OP -- if you are in search of a Christian Curr there are seveal great options ...

Aimee
post #7 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma Aimee View Post
What makes a writting plan "Classical" or "not"

Aimee
With classical language arts programs there's more of an emphasis on memory work, copywork, summarizing, and grammar-intense exercises. It's all very good, but starting with a kid who hates to write it was overwhelming, so we found Writing Strands which has 5-20 minute lessons per day and with an end result, not just a page of exercises. Grammar, spelling, and creative writing are rolled into one with the idea that the dry parts will be learned by doing - they make their own spelling lists from often misspelled words in their work, for example.

We supplement with Editor In Chief for grammar/punctuation and during reading time we often go back over the chapter to find examples of that week's WS lesson: dialogue, description, paragraph structure..
post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 
Everyone, this has given me a lot to look over, thanks! Aimee, we are wanting a curriculum with a Christian influence, and I have looked at sonlight and a few others that hsing friends use, but I am drawn to the scholarly aspect of classical as well. I have looked at Veritas press, which is a Christian classical company, and it appeals to me, but I wanted to know how the structure has worked for others. I think ds would be interested; he seems to like 'doing school', and having it feel bookish and workish, but w/o leaving home. Thanks everyone, I am off to buy A Well Trained Mind!
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by laehmichal View Post
...I am off to buy A Well Trained Mind!

you can read a huge chunk of it online & make sure you want to buy it before actually taking the plunge (it's expensive). anyway...if you're interested:

http://books.google.com/books?id=mXI...l+trained+mind
post #10 of 22
I consider us to be eclectic with a classical leaning. I love the well trained mind and use it as a guide.
post #11 of 22
We're classical homeschoolers. We really like the ideas outlined in the Latin Centered Curriculum and the Well Trained Mind.
post #12 of 22
We are eclectic with a bent towards classical - and the bent is getting stronger all the time per ds' request. I didn't read WTM until we had been going down this road for a little bit. Like other's have said, it's a great resource.
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by laf512 View Post
Have you read The Well-Trained Mind? I highly recommend reading it as there is a wealth of information in it regarding the classical approach. It basically outlines the structure of a classical approach and recommends several different curriculum for various subjects at each grade level. Then within those subjects, you can look up the reviews online for the suggested curriculum.
''
we use that and love it DS is now 8
post #14 of 22
Veritas press, was going to be my suggestion

also -- look at this:

http://simplycharlottemason.com/planning/eyguide/

and

http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/inspiredinfo/594515/ (blog of a clssical HS mom)

and

ESPICALLY

http://www.classical-homeschooling.org/celoop/1000.html

and

http://www.classical-homeschooling.org/index.html

the last two are expically useful

Lilly Grace (loovoe that name) thanks for the complete answer, i didn't think about that -- grammer drills vs "just writing" hummmm

Aimee
post #15 of 22
ohhhh My father's World also fits the bill as Classical and Christian, i know 2 people IRL who like it
post #16 of 22
Sonlight is good. Plus, if you feel the need to have lessons plans to show interested parties, you can show them the Instructor's Guide. You can actually order it by itself w/o investing in the whole Core. You might also see if there is a Classical Conversations community nearby - www.classicalconversations.com
We love it.
post #17 of 22
The Well-Trained Mind also has a forum like this:
http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/

And if you DO decide to buy the book, there's a 10th anniversary revision (mostly updated curriculum recommendations, per the author) - I think it's expected in the next month or so. If you wait, you can either get the newer version or a cheaper older version once the new one's released.

Our library carries both older versions, too.
post #18 of 22
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post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by littlewing View Post
The Well-Trained Mind also has a forum like this:
http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/

And if you DO decide to buy the book, there's a 10th anniversary revision (mostly updated curriculum recommendations, per the author) - I think it's expected in the next month or so. If you wait, you can either get the newer version or a cheaper older version once the new one's released.

Our library carries both older versions, too.
Big vote for the new edition from me. :
post #20 of 22
Ordering the May 2009 edition now! I've been eyeing this for the past week, and now that it's out, I'm snatching it up now.

I have a 4 year old, we plan to do an eclectic style of homeschooling, lots of hands-on for the early years. I love many parts of classical education, but don't like some. I'm building our own curriculum, and it's been a blast so far.
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