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Two passports?

post #1 of 66
Thread Starter 
Just wondering if anyone or your kids have passports issued by two different countries? If so what are the benefits for your family?
post #2 of 66
By benefits, do you mean the advantages of having two passports?

My two children and I have French and American passports. It is useful for travelling to these countries (we live in Canada) when waiting in the immigration lines at the airport, and for ID purposes. But it is also important to note, that with the exception of the US, obtaining a nationality and then having a passport can be two different things. Most countries have national official ID cards (issued for free) which are not passports but can be used in places like the EU where you can more or less travel between most countries without passport controls at the border.
post #3 of 66
We have. The immigration lines are one thing but for me it's just establishing that they are also German, just in case for later if they want to live in Germany, go to a German University or so.
post #4 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christine&men View Post
We have. The immigration lines are one thing but for me it's just establishing that they are also German, just in case for later if they want to live in Germany, go to a German University or so.
yep, though in our case it's Dutch, but same difference!

I'm thinking of finally getting my Dutch citizenship, since i can keep my American nationality as well. I'm tired of lines at EU immigration and it might help me with access to EU-wide funding for projects in my field. I'd also like to vote. I may apply this Summer.

Anyway, I think it mostly helps and usually doesn't hurt, though, of course, it depends on the obligations that go along with carrying the passport (military service, taxes, etc.)
post #5 of 66
My kids do also (except Avraham Tzvi, gotta take care of that). Main reason is my parents would go nuts if I didn't get them US citizenship, and when you travel to the US you need to come / go on a US passport.
post #6 of 66
The travel thing, and dealing with embassies if need be -- some things require the presentation of a passport, and if you can produce one that shows you to be a citizen of that embassy's nation those things can go a lot more smoothly. I've only dealt with embassies from two countries, but both made it pretty clear that they don't very much like helping people who come with the wrong I.D.
post #7 of 66
My dh and both kids have dual Filipino/Dutch citizenship, ds1 is also a US citizen (was born there). Other than the travel/practical issues now, I think it allows them more opportunities later in life, should they wish to study/work/live elsewhere.
Also, like a pp said, I think it's important to validate in a way their multicultural heritage.
The reasoning for my dh to apply for Dutch citizenship (I'm Dutch) is mostly so he would have all rights to work and stay here, even if we were to divorce or something would happen to me (originally his residency status here was dependent upon me being an EU citizen).
post #8 of 66
both eldest children have two passports, which seems logic to me since dh and I were born in different countries ... now the youngest has 3 birth certificates and so far only one passport (because of the cost but she can apply anytime for the other two with the birth certificates anyway ...) which is neither my dh nationaliy nor mine ... just the country we were living in when she was born (=the USA) we didn't have a choice actually, she HAD to have all her American ID in order, first, and only then, could we proceed with the paperwork for our own respective nationalities...

advantages= a reminder of who their parents come from & opening doors for travel-studies-possibility to settle down hassle free somewhere else in the future

disadvantage= cost of passport and lengthy procedures with each country having different requirements and rules ...
post #9 of 66
Remember that making your child a citizen of another country also holds them to certain responsibilities. Quite a few countries have compulsory military service when, usually men, are between the ages of 18-20. Having a second citizenship generally does absolutely nothing to absolve your child from having to serve in the first or second country's military if that is what citizenship requires.

Just something to think about. Several people I know have decided against a citizenship for their child for this reason.
post #10 of 66
My son has two passports (US/Argentina), main reason is that you never know when inmigration laws may get harsh, and we want him to be able to freely explore his cultures of origin. I can't think of any disadvantage.
post #11 of 66
My son has 2 passports (English and American) I think its great, makes travelling so much easier as we just swap depending on what country we are in. The English one allows him to travel hassle free throughout Europe too. I wish I had 2 passports !!
post #12 of 66
We didn't really have a choice... Venezuelan law requires Venezuelan citizens to enter and depart Venezuela using Venezuelan passports. We are afraid to go to visit family and be unable to come back to the US with DD.
post #13 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonnenwende View Post
Having a second citizenship generally does absolutely nothing to absolve your child from having to serve in the first or second country's military if that is what citizenship requires.
Just wanted to point out that this is not universally true ... something to look into.
post #14 of 66
Irish and Canadian here, but they could have British too.
post #15 of 66
I have 2. So for I don't see such a big deal as a US passport gets me in anywhere I travel. The advantages so far are quicker lines and I think it is just cool to have more than 1.
post #16 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquesce View Post
Just wanted to point out that this is not universally true ... something to look into.
How is it not generally true? I've never heard of anyone getting out of this. This is has been a reason for some people to renounce the second citizenship (if the country will allow it for that reason, some like Germany, won't) or not take it up at all.

Being a citizen of two countries comes with certain responsibilities as citizens. It's not all fun and games for easy travel.
post #17 of 66
I know in Norway you are still obligated to report for military service even if you aren't living in the country. For financial reasons (Norway foots the bill for holiday travel for service people that are away from home) and because they don't really need the manpower it would be highly unlikely to actually be required to serve. But you are still supposed to sign up. In addition the draft isn't just for 18 year olds, we had to look into if my husband would be required to serve when we moved into the country and he was still under the upper age limit.
post #18 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonnenwende View Post
How is it not generally true? I've never heard of anyone getting out of this. This is has been a reason for some people to renounce the second citizenship (if the country will allow it for that reason, some like Germany, won't) or not take it up at all.

Being a citizen of two countries comes with certain responsibilities as citizens. It's not all fun and games for easy travel.
Ok ... I didn't comment on whether it's generally true or not; that I don't know. I said it's not universally true, as in not true of all countries. Which I said because I know in Egypt, for example, mandatory conscription is waived for dual citizens. For all I know they could be the only country on earth with such a system, but then again they might not. It's just something to look into when looking at dual citizenship, not to assume.
post #19 of 66
France used to have an upper age limit & we looked for it for my husband when he wanted to get French nationality, now compulsory military service has been scraped but there's a 3 (or 5 ?) days period when you have to report and attend tests and a few classes .... I think it's even for girls now too ...

but some other countries DO still have military service for young men for up to 2 years ... I know because that's one of the reasons my nephews won't claim the passport from their father's country ...
post #20 of 66
The kiddies have individual US passports and are also on DH's Egyptian passport (kids do not have individual passports in Egypt). The main advantage is that we don't need to get visas for the kids when we visit Egypt... nor US visas when we come home. They enter Egypt on their Dad's passport, and then enter the US on their American passports.

The military service thing isn't an issue for dual-national kids in Egypt.
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