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Rapid labor and not making it to hospital - Page 2

post #21 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by cristeen View Post
I just meant that 911 is to be used in case of an emergency. A breathing baby and a mama who isn't bleeding out isn't an emergency. It just seems like an abuse of the system. And I know my medical insurance won't pay for a non-emergency ambulance transport, I'd be stuck with that bill. I'd much rather make prior arrangements with a HBMW, that in case of a precipitous labor she'd be available for the immediate post-partum care so you wouldn't have to go into the hospital after baby is born. If you call her, you pay her, if you don't call her, you don't pay her. .
ah... What about states what don't have HBMW? Plus, I'm pretty sure mainstream America would view having a baby at home grounds to call the squad.

Honest questions! I'm not trying to be snarky! If I were to birth at home, (which I secretly want to do) I wouldn't know what to do with myself after I got the baby out! Would I just call my mom? Would I even have to go to the hospital? I've heard its a nightmare and a half to get a birth cert if you aren't born in a hospital.

I'm not ready (nor do I have the time LO is due in a month!) to research a full on HB. What about emergency HB or crash course HB?
post #22 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by kriket View Post
ah... What about states what don't have HBMW? Plus, I'm pretty sure mainstream America would view having a baby at home grounds to call the squad.
I think all (or almost all) states have HBMW. They may not be licensed in every state, but you should be able to find a lay midwife almost anywhere.

If you want to birth at home -go for it! If your state doesn't have Certified Nurse Midwives or Certified Professional Midwives - find a lay (or Direct Entry) Midwife to help you with your delivery. She will help direct you in terms of what to do, take care of the birth certificate, etc.

Thousands of women have planned homebirths, either with midwives or unassisted, and never go to the hospital. There just isn't any need to for a normal birth.
post #23 of 51
Thread Starter 
Wow! All this is great information, thanks (((((((((EVERYONE))))))))). I had no idea that if I ...uh-hem... accidentally HBed that I could possibly find a MW to come and do the birth certificate and usual stuff. Now the trick for me would be to convince hubby that there was no need to go to the hospital after baby is born.

Interesting idea about going in an ambulance and being able to hold baby instead of carseating him. I wondered about that. I hate the idea of going in an ambulance with all the sirens a blazing. My DH works in emergency communication and he says that it's standard for ambulance to have sirens on, unless transportee has been announced d-e-a-d.

I'm in Raleigh, NC. Any ideas where I could look for a back up MW? Also, would a midwife have vit k drops? If we are in hospital I was just going to do the shot, but would actually prefer drops.

As for "medical" babycare, would the MW do weights and measures on baby and then I could go to our pediatrician's office for the newborn screenings/testings?

Wow, this is really giving me lots ot think about.

Penny
post #24 of 51
hi OP!

first off, for perspective, be THANKFUL you have short labors! many who don't are very envious!

My 2nd child was born after 1 1/2 hours, accidentally at home (we were planning to birth with a hospital based midwife practice). I was actually on the phone with my midwife when I started pushing, and after the baby came, she came to my house, delivered the placenta, checked me and the baby, etc. It was an amazing experience and i was totally on a high from it being so fast and easy!

#3 we just had in a different city, where I did decide I wanted to deliver at the hospital (homebirth midwives here are two hours away, which I couldn't risk after baby #2!). I ended up going to the hospital pretty early while my contractions were still managable, and instead of going to labor and delievery, I sat in a lobby on my birth ball reading a magazine. my labor totally stalled doing that, so we drove back home and labored there before going back (it ended up being a labor of about 5 hours total).

anyhow, if you really want to be at the hospital, I do recommend just hanging out in the parking lot or lobby until you're really ready.
post #25 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Penny4Them View Post

As for "medical" babycare, would the MW do weights and measures on baby and then I could go to our pediatrician's office for the newborn screenings/testings?

Wow, this is really giving me lots ot think about.

Penny
I would check out the homebirth forum here to get more information. It sounds like you could benefit from really researching homebirth some more. Having a planned homebirth just might be the thing for you.

I am pregnant with my first child, and planning a homebirth. My prenatal appointments are covered by my hb midwife, the birth will be at my house attended by my midwives (and whoever else I choose to be there), and all the immediate post-natal tests (weights, measures, apgar, birth certificate, etc) will be attended to by the midwives (on my bed, while I hold the baby - no separation). I will not see an OB or go to the hospital ever during the pregnancy and birth (unless an actual medical issue arises.) A normal birth (and the vast majority of births are perfectly normal) is a physiological process, NOT a medical event - even though most people treat it like it is a medical problem. You do not NEED to go to a hospital either to birth or immediately after for a normal birth.

Again, check out the homebirth forum here. Also, check out the movie The Business of Being Born for an amazing look at homebirth. It's available on Netflix and at Blockbuster.
post #26 of 51
If the baby is out and breathing fine and you're in ok shape, there is almost nothing that you have to do. If you want to tie off the cord and cut if after it is done pulsing you can. But you don't have to. At some point (generally within an hour or so)you'll need to push out the placenta, so you might want a bowl for that.
You could call your mom if you wanted, of course. But you wouldn't *need* her there. Just hold the baby on your chest, cover up with blankets and at some point he should start rooting around and find your breast. If you want to you can wipe him clean, but a bath is not a requirement.
Even if I weren't planning on a homebirth, if one happened "accidentally" and both baby and I were fine and healthy there is no way I would possibly go to a hospital.
post #27 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Penny4Them View Post
I hate the idea of going in an ambulance with all the sirens a blazing. My DH works in emergency communication and he says that it's standard for ambulance to have sirens on, unless transportee has been announced d-e-a-d.
That's interesting. Twice I have ridden with my kids, when they were older babies (two different kids in two different states - major deja vu), in ambulances with no sirens, just driving the normal speed of traffic. Both times we were being transported from the ped's office to the hospital for oxygen (bronchiolitis).
post #28 of 51
Thread Starter 
I should clarify ... sirens are not used if it's a non-urgent transport. I have to talk with Dh again about this, as maybe I misunderstood him. It sounded like they would regard new baby as an urgent transport.
post #29 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Penny4Them View Post
I should clarify ... sirens are not used if it's a non-urgent transport. I have to talk with Dh again about this, as maybe I misunderstood him. It sounded like they would regard new baby as an urgent transport.
Thanks for clarifying - that's even more interesting.
post #30 of 51
You really don't need a lot of *stuff*, as other people have mentioned. Just lots of towels. Perhaps it would be most prudent to prepare for a few of the more common urgent/emergency situations if you have a precipitous labor and are still at home:

1) hemorrhage (esp if you're on anticoagulants): would your OB perhaps give you a Rx for a shot of Pit or oral Methergine in case this situation happens? Does your dh know how to administer an intramuscular shot? It's not too hard to learn how (my husband had to when I was doing fertility treatments--got a shot of progesterone in the butt every night for 2 weeks, so now he's a pro!)
2) neonatal resuscitation (especially how to recognize when to start resuscitation & how to do mouth-to-mouth on a newborn. Karen Strange's classes are awesome if she is ever coming to your area)

I like the idea of laboring in the hotel lobby if you do get there and have more time than anticipated!
post #31 of 51
If you really want to birth in the hospital, as soon as you go into labor go over and hang out in the hospital's public areas while your dh settles the kids with childcare, etc.

If you really want to have a homebirth, work to make that happen. Since your dh is in the emergency field he should know ambulance response times for your area for different scenarios and know what "too much" blood looks like. He most likely won't need those skills at all if you have a homebirth, but having those skills should be making him less nervous about the homebirth option. Really, I suspect that he's just feeling like he doesn't know how to do everything for birthing and what will help is to point out that he won't have to know everything if you have a planned homebirth, but he WILL have to know everything if things happen in the car.
post #32 of 51
In terms of your ambulance protocol, check with your local first aid squad. Each one has their own procedures and protocols. I work as an EMT and even from one town to the next we do different things.

I am also someone who has rather fast births, but my fourth surprised me and was quite a bit longer than the previous one which was 2 hours. So you might be surprised!

But I think it is great to be prepared. I also agree that you should check on your hospitals protocols because it would be very sad if they whisked your perfectly healthy baby away to the nicu for a battery of tests and preventative treatments based on your baby arriving in what they see as un-sterile environment! If the baby is healthy you might be able to refuse to "admit" the baby as a patient, and simply let your partner bring the baby in as a "visitor" so you can get yourself sorted out and not have to be separated from your baby.

In terms of delivering at home, just do your research. I had a planned home birth but still did lots of research on what to do if the baby arrived before the MW which was a realistic possibility. I specifically researched your basic emergencies like shoulder dystocia, PPH and how to handle them by yourself. I found Ina May Gaskin's books very useful as well Diane Gregg's book amazing birth stories which gave me some useful natural herbal remedy suggestions.

Luckily I did not need to use any of the info!
Wishing you a wonderful birthing experience.

Wishing you
post #33 of 51
you're smart to plan this out. b/c homebirth is wonderful. hospital birth can be wonderful... but carbirth? well it's certainly less than ideal!! (if you think birthing in a hospital bed is uncomfortable, imagine birthing in a carseat!) can't be all that comfy.


is here something holding you back from homebrith to begin with? is it a possiblity to just choose homebirth to begin with? how about if it were with a very experience CNM that your husband could meet and grill? I understand if this isn't an option, I just think it must safer and easier than a carbirth heh
post #34 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphire_chan View Post
If you really want to birth in the hospital, as soon as you go into labor go over and hang out in the hospital's public areas while your dh settles the kids with childcare, etc.

If you really want to have a homebirth, work to make that happen. Since your dh is in the emergency field he should know ambulance response times for your area for different scenarios and know what "too much" blood looks like. He most likely won't need those skills at all if you have a homebirth, but having those skills should be making him less nervous about the homebirth option. Really, I suspect that he's just feeling like he doesn't know how to do everything for birthing and what will help is to point out that he won't have to know everything if you have a planned homebirth, but he WILL have to know everything if things happen in the car.
I think this is great advise
post #35 of 51
Thread Starter 
I really would prefer a planned homebirth, however out of respect for my Dh and his concerns (and fears, esp b/c of his profession--he's exposed to lots of stuff that is always going wrong-death stuff) I have decided to strive for a home-like birth in hospital. I have been visualizing and I guess outright wishing for a real homebirth, and want to plan for one in case-as I do believe in a person's ability to manifest our truest desires. BUT I suppose I'm keeping this in the closet--well NOT here, but in my family. It won't be the end of the world if I have a hospital birth, but I have so many other issues I'm pushing with my family: ie delayed or no VAX, no circ, no pain meds during labor--limited interventions. I'm guess I'm trying to pick my battles and prioritize which ones are most important. My Dh is very supportive but has more trust/faith in hospitals and medicine than in my self-educated positions on these matters.

Also, all my searches on MW sites have come up fruitless for my area. I haven't fully exhausted my search, but it just doesn't seem to be a instant option for me.

I really appreciate everyone's ideas and feedback on this topic. It's definitely made me think a lot, and also caused me self-analysis about why I'm not asserting myself more to have ALL the things I dream of for my birth and my baby's health.

Thanks everyone.
post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Penny4Them View Post
I should clarify ... sirens are not used if it's a non-urgent transport. I have to talk with Dh again about this, as maybe I misunderstood him. It sounded like they would regard new baby as an urgent transport.
They didn't use sirens with me when I lost half my blood volume during a miscarriage. I wonder when they do use the sirens?
post #37 of 51
Penny4Them -

first I wanted to say I think you respecting your DH's thoughts is GREAT!! it souds like you have a close relationship and I truly think birth should bring people closer. sometimes that takes some creative thinking. So please don't think I was trying to give the impression you should ignore your husbands concerns.

I was just thinking, perhaps if he talked to a midwife he might realize birth at home can be A LOT safer than in the hospital, especially if you have fast labours. it truly is dangerous to have a baby in a car... and he woud be stuck delivering himself. unless he wants a UC, that could be the total opposite of what he wants. I know a lot of husbands have it in their minds that all midwives are hippy dippies who dont know anything about preventing or saving a sick baby or mother - even if they are told otherwise, I believe many husband just don't realize how smart and well educated many midwives are on a host of things. AND there is always an option of a hospital AND midwife if anything comes up. planned homebirth and transfer if needed could be a lot safer than just hoping you make it to the hospital in time you know what I mean? some people will see both a midwife and an OB and reguester at a hospital so all their bases are covered.


anyhow, whatever you decide to do, I hope you are able to meet your needs and your DHs needs too.
post #38 of 51
I didn't read all of the replies but wanted to say there is a great book called "The birth partner" that has a section with lots of valuable info about delivering a baby if there is no care provider present. The most important thing is to LEAVE THE CORD ALONE. DO not attempt to cut it or tie it off. Just leave it alone. Honestly, if all were well and you still wanted to go to the hospital I'd drive (well have someone else drive obviously) rather than call 911. EMTs don't have much in the way of training in labor and delivery and often do more harm than good.
post #39 of 51
ive had a similar history as yours~ first one was 5 ours, second 3 hours, 3rd on was 45 minute and thank god, a planned homebirth. were expecting the 4th and my partner is studying up on how to deliver the bbe should the midwife ot make it to our house in time. you could have a shower curtain handy to put down, cover it with a few towels, or chucks pads which you can get at a medical suppy store. a blanket and hat to keep baby warm. a nasal bulb thing in case babe needs help breathing, a few strings to tie on each side of where the cord will be cut, and a large bowl to catch the placenta.and thats about all i can think of. its actually nice to be at home because you know where the cups are if you need water, where the blankets are etc. my ds was nearly born in the car~ i was holding his head in when we pulled up to the emergency room. ill never go through that again. homebirth for me please!
post #40 of 51
Quote:
1) hemorrhage (esp if you're on anticoagulants): would your OB perhaps give you a Rx for a shot of Pit or oral Methergine in case this situation happens? Does your dh know how to administer an intramuscular shot? It's not too hard to learn how (my husband had to when I was doing fertility treatments--got a shot of progesterone in the butt every night for 2 weeks, so now he's a pro!)
2) neonatal resuscitation (especially how to recognize when to start resuscitation & how to do mouth-to-mouth on a newborn. Karen Strange's classes are awesome if she is ever coming to your area)
8o

Two good reasons to have a backup midwife who is trained and experienced in such procedures, and can legally do so.

The "finding your tribe" area of MDC should be good to find someone. Otherwise you can Google it, I suppose...

Quote:
I wonder when they do use the sirens?
The sirens are a traffic control device. I'm sure they use them when they need to. They would not use them to control traffic when the person is dead, but they also would not need to if there were no traffic.
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