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How can I work on letter sounds with my toddler?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
DS is 20 months old. I'm concerned because he starts most of his "words" with the letter B. "Bight" for light, "bup" for up, "boo" for two, etc. Also, whenever he signs a word he cannot pronounce, he just says "buh" with it. I try emphasizing consonant sounds with him, but he just goes back to B.

He does say mama correctly and will say hot, hi, and eye, so I know there's hope. I just don't know how to better help him along with everything else.

Thank you!
post #2 of 10
:

I would love resources or tips on helping with this. My dd substitutes "W" for "L" (e.g., wowwypop instead of lollipop). There's one other substitution she does, but I can't remember!
post #3 of 10
Children of this age cannot say the L sound. By the way kids can't often say the L sound even at four. Therefore substituting another sound is perfectly developmentally appropriate and typical. You don't teach it. If a child isn't developing appropriately in this area it is a speech issue called articulation and you seek speech therapy. But bight for light is at 20 months is not a problem. I'll look for a list for aquisition of certain letter sounds.

But if you are concerned you would ask for an early intervention speech assessment if the child is younger than 3. Older than three it is the school system and/or private therapy.

Here is one chart. http://www.wayland.k12.ma.us/speech/...tic_norms.html
General information on speech articulation and why he is substituting. http://www.njsha.org/faqs/articulation.asp
post #4 of 10
Is this really something to be concerned about at 20 months???
my 2 y.o replaces lots of sounds for wrong ones...duck = guck, light = wight... but she also learns new words correctly everyday. I just figured the "b" soung was easy for then to learn because she learned so many B words faster than others.
post #5 of 10
I wouldn't worry about it too much at this stage. My son does great with any c-sounds - cat, cup, cow, car, all clear as a bell, but other sounds are sort of hit and miss. He says 'no' very clearly, but he says 'urtz' for nurse - why doesn't he add the n onto nurse? He's gone from calling to dog (whose name is Sumi) 'Su' to 'Sooie' to 'Mimi'. He used to say 'horse', but now says 'shorshey'. He calls ladybugs 'lay-da-lay-da-lee', and anytime he knows an animal in a book but can't pronounce it, he will point at it and say 'yeah'. Just keep talking to him and it will probably sort itself out within a year or so. And write down the funny pronounciations. I will be sorta sad when my son doesn't point at a ladybug and say lay-da-lay-da-lee anymore.
post #6 of 10
that sounds pretty normal. I'm sure you model correct speech, right? My ds is 16 months and drops/subsitutes the last letter on everything. car is "ca," mom is "ma," hot is "hop" and "gato" (cat) is "gako" lol. I just keep on saying it correctly so that he hears the difference. I'm sure it will come eventually.
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Go figure - it's just another normal developmental thing that I worry about for no reason. Thanks for the progression charts and personal stories.

We're off now to play with the "beebee" (read "puppy"). Thanks mamas!
post #8 of 10
Hee, no worries. If you don't have prior experience and knowledge, then you don't know if it's something to worry about or not. Better to ask the question and find out that it's fine, than to ignore it and have it turn out to be something you should have worried about!

DD's "shtick" for awhile was that she couldn't do two different consonants in the same word, even if she was perfectly capable of doing those consonants independently. So her cousin Caleb was "bee-yub", her brother David was "day-day", a cup was "pup", a cat was "tat"... She's got that all sorted out now, but she's 28 months, which is very different than 20!

She also said "beena" for "ballerina" for the longest time. Now she says "bambina" which is, if possible, even cuter.

And yes, write them all down. I still have a list of my now 11-yo son's "words" as a toddler. He was an early talker so if anything that gives even more funny pronounciations. His first real 'big word' was aww-mo-mo. That's lawnmower, of course.
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by sbgrace View Post
Children of this age cannot say the L sound. By the way kids can't often say the L sound even at four. Therefore substituting another sound is perfectly developmentally appropriate and typical. You don't teach it. If a child isn't developing appropriately in this area it is a speech issue called articulation and you seek speech therapy. But bight for light is at 20 months is not a problem. I'll look for a list for aquisition of certain letter sounds.

But if you are concerned you would ask for an early intervention speech assessment if the child is younger than 3. Older than three it is the school system and/or private therapy.

Here is one chart. http://www.wayland.k12.ma.us/speech/...tic_norms.html
General information on speech articulation and why he is substituting. http://www.njsha.org/faqs/articulation.asp
awesome info-thanks
post #10 of 10
Like the PPs I wouldn't worry, but I would gladly use a toy that DD loves and seemed to help her learn letter sounds.

It's a Leap Frog toy that goes on the fridge, and has each letter A-Z as magnets. When you put a letter into the small base it sings that letter and the sound it makes ("B says Buh" for the B magnet). The toy "speaks" clearly enough that there's no confusion between similar-sounding letters. HTH!
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