or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Frugality & Finances › Save hundreds of dollars a month of groceries - a vent
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Save hundreds of dollars a month of groceries - a vent - Page 4

post #61 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by PenelopeJune View Post
I agree, but I just wish for once there was an article where I wasn't already doing every single thing on the list!
Or more than the article suggests. I read a blog post a few months ago with suggestions on how to save $1,000 a month. About half the ideas were more expensive than what we were doing already. I went through item by item and listed our savings: less than $50.

Now, if we took it to the ridiculous place of actually adding costs to the level she suggested (e.g., we don't subscribe to cable, one of her suggestions was cutting back to basic cable, so if I subscribed to basic cable to follow her instructions to the letter) we'd actually be spending about $50 MORE each month.

I guess what I don't understand is this whole idea of what is NEEDED (that, of course, isn't really needed). Why would you need cable at all? Sure, I'd like to have some of the networks. Whenever we've had the chance to stay at a hotel, I love watching the Weather Channel or Food Network or whatever, but it's certainly not something that I can't live without.
post #62 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amys1st View Post
I think even cooking from scratch and home made mean very different things to everyone. There is even a show on the food channel called semi home made. Basically its= take a bag of salad, put in a bowl, get jar of dressing and put on. Then chop up a cucumber and add shredded already cheddar cheese. Well at least its fresh ingredients! There are homes across america that think this is home made. If thats what it takes to get everyone to sit down and "cook" fine. ...........
But that is not cooking! And how do people believe that it is? I'm sorry, that show just truly drives me insane. It is one of my biggest pet peeves.:

I really wonder how/why we have lost the ability to feed ourselves.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leta View Post
............................

When I was working at a bank, this weasely investment dude came in after closing one day, to try to pep talk us into setting up more "meetings" with the investment "counselor". He used the analogy of "The $110,000 Question", and said that's how much money it takes for a couple to eat three meals a day, for ten years, even if their just eating at Wendy's. I remember sitting there thinking, "Right, you've made it to retirement without a kitchen? There's no food on earth cheaper than Wendy's?" It's the same sort of thinking, that the solution is to earn moremoremore, spend moremoremore, invest moremoremore, rather than scale back, slow down, and do a different kind of investing.
I'm not sure you could PAY me $110,000 to eat three meals a day, for ten years at Wendy's. UGH!

Now that I think about it, no amount of money is worth doing that!
post #63 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbymom05 View Post
As strange as it sounds, I think these articles give some people permission to save money. Seriously, my SIL grew up in a fairly affluent family and she acts like it's a shameful thing to have to economize, so an article like that makes her feel trendy rather than poor. Honestly, if all you went by was the mass media--whose best interest is to make everyone think they should be spending more--you'd think everyone lived better than you did.
You know, I'd never really thought about it that way. That's a great point.
post #64 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by SAHDS View Post
I had a friend (years back) who claimed her ranch dressing was homemade when I said how good it was. She then showed me the packet and told me what she had added to "make it". Seriously, she believed that was homemade. I hesitate to say DH's spaghetti sauce is from scratch/homemade since he didn't grow the tomatoes (although he planted some last week so that'll soon change!)

As for those articles - sadly they're written for the masses and I'm not surprised it helps the average person.

And a big "YEAH" to the question of why they never make coupons I could actually use.
Well, the homemade thing...I mean, we can only take that so far. Because if you had to make everything yourself to call it homemade then most definitely I couldn't call my blue cheese dressing homemade...because I don't culture my own buttermilk, nor make my own mayonnaise or cuture my own blue cheese. Serious limitations here, as I don't live on a farm to get my milk, eggs, etc. And the veggie oil for use in the mayo...I didn't cold press it myself either. But I still call it homemade as I didn't buy a pre-pacakaged mix to make it.

And the person who talked about a $12 shirt...yeah, the stuff on the morning shows is seriously scarry to me. We had a bealls clearance center in the neighborhood. When they had their huge sales we would all get together and go there, sometimes for 4-6 hours and get things typically for $.80-3.00. And, I'm not joking, but things like $60 pair of sweatpants, for $1.80. I so wish they hadn't moved out of the neighborhood! The last time I went my mom bought be a $200 little black dress for $6. Most of the clothes we have though I paid less than $3 a piece for. Stocked up for clothes for the kids, I have quite a few in larger sizes!
post #65 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristyMarie View Post
But that is not cooking! And how do people believe that it is? I'm sorry, that show just truly drives me insane. It is one of my biggest pet peeves.:
I really wonder how/why we have lost the ability to feed ourselves.
That show drives me a bit batty as well. And yes, in my world this show is not cooking which is why I put quotes around cooking. But in households everywhere in America, this is cooking sadly. The cute girl on the show is actaully a decorator which is why they have the table all set at the end. To me, taking chicken bones, an older onion, some tired celery in the back of the drawer, some herbs and a few gallons of water on the stove is wonderful chicken stock this afternoon. That is cooking in our home but my friends and neighbors IRL, I would be as someone pp- extreme. whatever!
post #66 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amys1st View Post
That show drives me a bit batty as well. And yes, in my world this show is not cooking which is why I put quotes around cooking. But in households everywhere in America, this is cooking sadly.
Got into this discussion with a friend...she claims to be 'cooking' while really it is 'assembly'. Opening a bag/reheating, etc. is what she does. In fact, she thought it was weird that people still buy the regular mac and cheese when now 'you can just buy easy mac' and don't have to drain.

(dare I say I make it from scratch)
post #67 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leta View Post
I can buy organic soybeans for $1.60/#. This makes a gallon of soymilk, which in turn makes a pound of tofu. So it is very cost effective.
Your prices are always so cheap that they make me jealous. Until this one. My local store sells homemade (by them) tofu for $1/lb. And, I agree--the fresh stuff is soooo yummy. We really like it.
post #68 of 107
About the "Semi-home made" food show, I haven't watched it myself but the concept sounds interesting.

I make most of my foods from scratch, soups, stews, yoghurt, etc. but there are days when I'm crunched for time, the kids are cranky and I'm too tired to be creative with ingredients. If I had a show that said to me, buy this, that and the other, throw it together and get a semi nutritious meal in 20 minutes, for cheaper than going out, I'd probably watch it.
post #69 of 107
This might be new info for some folks out there. My mom does this all the time and swears by it.

She has an item she likes, uses it all the time but wants to save money on it. Or maybe there is an item she would like to try. She calls the company, number on the box, and tells them how much she likes the product but wishes it was more affordable...do they have any coupons? and no joke they send her a stack of coupons just like that...nothing lost but a few minutes on the phone.

She also calls if she gets an item she was disappointed with but might be willing to try again. Ex. last week she bought chili paste to make a dish with and it wasn't spicy, so she called and they sent her a ton of coupons. Apparently she wasn't the first to mention it and they were appoligetic.

She has also been known to email or mail them if she didn't get anything over the phone.
post #70 of 107
Wow, I am super jealous of fresh tofu at $1 a pound.

It makes sense though- we have no real Asian population here, and are knee deep in dairy country. The tofu at the store costs $3 a pound and is just okay.
post #71 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatchristy View Post
. In fact, she thought it was weird that people still buy the regular mac and cheese when now 'you can just buy easy mac' and don't have to drain.

(dare I say I make it from scratch)
Do I dare say I do too? It literally takes the same amount of time to make mac/cheese from scratch as it does to buy a boxed kind, boil and then add the packet and stuff. I have never bought the ready made stuff so I cannot comment. And also to add- to make it from scratch is the same price but you get a lot more.
post #72 of 107
I was a teenager before I'd ever had the boxed kind. A mom left it for me while I was babysitting. Yuck. I couldn't believe that it was the stuff of legends. LOL

We still don't eat it at our house, and my kids haven't ever had it, either. I'm a white sauce mac and cheese kind of girl. Yum.
post #73 of 107
I do and have done many of my own "semi-homemade" things. When DD was first born heck yeah I used those bags of frozen cut up bell peppers, and quick cook brown rice so we could at least eat something that tasted fresh and wasn't completely from a box. I do know how to make my own bread, but why would I bother, DH won't eat it unless it's fresh from the oven. He won't make a sandwich with it, so it's just good for a yummy snack.

I personally don't frown on using some convenience items, I have frozen bags of stir fry mix veggies, that cost a buck. Try getting a bunch of asparagus, carrots, cauliflower and green beans for a dollar in February in E. WA it won't be happening. I buy those and stock up on them, I buy frozen corn and peas. I have a couple bags of baby carrots in the fridge, I just like some items that make life a bit easier, and I still can make a stellar homemade dinner.
post #74 of 107
Leta, you could probably make a ton of cash if you marketed your frugal skills and taught classes.
post #75 of 107
The comment about these "no-brainer" tips being directed at men and the comment about the neighbor's husband?

That describes my DH. He has no, I mean ZERO, concept of money-related food costs. It would never occur to him to look at a price or comparison shop. He buys whats looks good to him.

He is no longer allowed to do the grocery shopping and it has to be a true emergency before I ask him to swing by the store on the way home. He simply can't be trusted to buy off a list.

I know where his behavior and attitude comes from and I know it is likely never going to change so I have taken over that household duty.
post #76 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caneel View Post
The comment about these "no-brainer" tips being directed at men and the comment about the neighbor's husband?

That describes my DH. He has no, I mean ZERO, concept of money-related food costs. It would never occur to him to look at a price or comparison shop. He buys whats looks good to him.

He is no longer allowed to do the grocery shopping and it has to be a true emergency before I ask him to swing by the store on the way home. He simply can't be trusted to buy off a list.

I know where his behavior and attitude comes from and I know it is likely never going to change so I have taken over that household duty.
My husband always comes home from the grocery store with tons of cheese and pickled hot peppers and things like that. I try to get him treats occasionally, but he just won't shop within our budget.

He never finishes the cheese either, it mostly goes bad.:
post #77 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluegoat View Post
My husband always comes home from the grocery store with tons of cheese and pickled hot peppers and things like that. I try to get him treats occasionally, but he just won't shop within our budget.

He never finishes the cheese either, it mostly goes bad.:
OMG - DH has a lost twin! Cheese, hot peppers - they must have been seperated at birth.

About 3 weeks ago, I sent him out to get one missing ingredient. A friend was coming over for dinner.

DH came back with not one but three different cheeses from the speciality section, two boxes of crackers and two loaves LaBrea bread. The bread was for the hot peppers I had picked up as a treat at the Italian market earlier in the week. It was at least $40 of stuff we didn't need.

Why? He thought we needed something to nibble on before dinner. Never mind he helped me prepare the planned appetizer.......
post #78 of 107
so what do we do if we work full time out of the home or are single?
post #79 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellp View Post
About the "Semi-home made" food show, I haven't watched it myself but the concept sounds interesting.

I make most of my foods from scratch, soups, stews, yoghurt, etc. but there are days when I'm crunched for time, the kids are cranky and I'm too tired to be creative with ingredients. If I had a show that said to me, buy this, that and the other, throw it together and get a semi nutritious meal in 20 minutes, for cheaper than going out, I'd probably watch it.
The thing is, you can come up with some meals like this and just keep them in mind.

My favorite "quick" meal is chicken "caesar" salad. The basis of it is that someone gave us one of those silly foreman grills as a wedding present . . . BUT I have discovered those things are wonderful to cook frozen (boneless) chicken breasts. Toss some seasoning on frozen chix breasts, toss onto pre-heated foreman. They take about 8 minutes to cook. (You could also use a regular grill/under the broiler, but I think that it takes about 15 minutes to cook the chicken breasts from frozen.)

Tear up lettuce and wash. Cut up some salad veggies if you like, or not. Mix together: a couple tablespoons mayo, dijon mustard, minced garlic, ground black pepper, squirt of lemon or dash of vinegar. Toss lettuce w/veggies in about half of the dressing mix. Put lettuce on plate.

Take chicken off grill, slice. Put on top of lettuce. Spoon additional dressing over chicken slices. Add some toasted bread if you want. Dinner It takes me just about 10 minutes end-to-end.

Oh, and since you say you make homemade yogurt and I have no idea if you consider mayo the devil or not . . . a nice, different dressing could be: plain yogurt, sour cream, dill, garlic, dash of lemon or vinegar, dash of olive oil. That's what I put on my potato salads and I bet it would taste yum on chicken.
post #80 of 107
My husband and I have discovered that we don't really like homemade bread the next day. So, I slice it up and use it for garlic bread toasted in the oven. It has cut down on our waste quite a bit.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Frugality & Finances
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Frugality & Finances › Save hundreds of dollars a month of groceries - a vent