or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Women's Health  › My story, my cure...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

My story, my cure... - Page 7

post #121 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by springmum View Post
Hmmm...so is soaking it the best way to reduce the arsenic content?

I've been toasting my nori/kelp and sprinkling it on my rice. I've also been eating more than a tblsp a day some days (some days none at all) So maybe I should back?
Interesting theoretically question. I believe that the arsenic content could decrease in a liquid solution per osmosis. That sounds logical in theory. However, how would you consume the kelp without the liquid, though?

I'm really not concerned about arsenic from certified organic sources which test for heavy metals. AND I get the benefit of it absorbing heavy metals from my gut, it seems. (although, apparently, it could theoretically absorb minerals from foods/supplements also.)

There are so many nutritive benefits of the kelp. It is a whole food and I believe we evolved from the sea. So, I'm going with Mother Nature's system of nutrition.

The quantities of iodine suggested recently are much higher than the RDA. The RDA is suspect. Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for Iodine for Adults 19 years and older 150 mcg per day.

But, my disclaimer, and based upon having (bromide) "reactions" with the 1/2 tsp and working up, I'm sticking with the max of 1 Tbls a day, plus our other food sources of iodine: sea salt, shrimp, scallops, oysters, salmon, yogurt, eggs, strawberries, cheddar cheese, CLO, beans, potatoes, turkey, etc. http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/minerals/iodine/ We've been including more seafood than meat recently. So, moderation from whole foods is my mantra.

The Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) for Iodine for Adults 19 years and older is 1,100 mcg/day (1.1 mg/day).

Halides 101: http://www.rumormillnews.com/cgi-bin...%3Bread=146203

I'm considering including KCl as a salt flush substitute also. But, not sure about that. Must research more first.


Additionally, "even alternative nutritional doctor Stephen Langer, MD, author of Solved: The Riddle of Illness, the follow-up book to Broda Barnes' Hypothyroidism: The Unsuspected Illness, advises against taking iodine or kelp supplements for people with autoimmune thyroid disease.

Hormone expert David Brownstein, MD, also offers caution regarding iodine.
Iodine supplementation in those that have an autoimmune thyroid problem can be akin to pouring gas over a fire. However, with hypothyroid conditions that are not autoimmune in nature, iodine-containing foods can actually help the thyroid function better."
http://thyroid.about.com/od/isthatso/f/iodine.htm


But, maybe it all comes back to eliminating gluten...




Pat
post #122 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom61508 View Post
I'm sure my ND believes in iodine as an essential nutrient but doesn't believe I'm deficient in it.
The ND might be interested to read Dr. Brownstein's Iodine book as it clearly explains that we are ALL deficient because of diet *and* toxins and why.
post #123 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by WuWei View Post
The Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) for Iodine for Adults 19 years and older is 1,100 mcg/day (1.1 mg/day).
Iodine researchers Brownstein, Abraham and Flechas blow this out of the water.

http://www.healthtruthrevealed.com/a...912805/article
http://www.optimox.com/pics/Iodine/opt_Research_I.shtml
post #124 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS View Post
The ND might be interested to read Dr. Brownstein's Iodine book as it clearly explains that we are ALL deficient because of diet *and* toxins and why.
This one? http://www.amazon.com/Iodine-Without.../dp/B000I2MMSI


Pat
post #125 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS View Post
Iodine researchers Brownstein, Abraham and Flechas blow this out of the water.

http://www.healthtruthrevealed.com/a...912805/article
http://www.optimox.com/pics/Iodine/opt_Research_I.shtml
I have run out of space to open more windows to read all of your informative links.


Pat, brain on overload here.
post #126 of 236
So if I have Hashi's, is iodine supplementation good or bad? I did have an iodine test done but the results aren't back yet. I do not convert T4 to T3 very well (optimal T4 but low in range T3) so my doctor told me to add kelp to my diet to improve the this.
post #127 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by WuWei View Post
I have run out of space to open more windows to read all of your informative links.


Pat, brain on overload here.

Welcome to the world the rest of us often live in when you post.
post #128 of 236
This may seem like "duh" to some of you, but I mentioned taking Iodine supplements to a friend and she said that we get enough iodine from food because of iodized salt. I know that I don't want that much salt in my diet, though. Any thoughts?
post #129 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bri'sgirl View Post
This may seem like "duh" to some of you, but I mentioned taking Iodine supplements to a friend and she said that we get enough iodine from food because of iodized salt. I know that I don't want that much salt in my diet, though. Any thoughts?
Per the recent discussion, we don't actually get enough iodine in our diet from salt.... According to Morton's, 1/4 tsp is 45% of the RDA (so approximately 67.5 mcg). In order to consume the amounts which are recommended by people who've researched it (as Jane said, 13.5 milligrams), you would need to consume 50 teaspoons of salt per day in order to get to a *maintenance* dose of iodine.
post #130 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by lablover View Post
So if I have Hashi's, is iodine supplementation good or bad? I did have an iodine test done but the results aren't back yet. I do not convert T4 to T3 very well (optimal T4 but low in range T3) so my doctor told me to add kelp to my diet to improve the this.
This is my Cliff's Notes to thyroid stuff:

This post has more info about T3 and T4 testing and meds. http://www.mothering.com/discussions...6&postcount=94

Here is "Recommended Labwork": http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com...ended-labwork/

Mistakes Patients Make: http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com...patients-make/

This post is about the nutritional issues and thyroid function.
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...9&postcount=68
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...&postcount=285
This is a list of supplements and how they function in the body. http://ithyroid.com/supplement_list.htm

I always recommend whole foods for nutritional support. Check the site "World's Healthiest Foods". It lists each of those nutrients and the foods most dense with that nutrient. http://www.whfoods.com/nutrientstoc.php Also, elimination of specific foods: cabbage, peaches, radishes, soy, peanuts, spinach and rutabagas which can interfere with thyroid hormone production.

Most of our diets are depleted in magnesium. We use Natural Calm. It is most bio-available. You want magnesium citrate. We also supplement with CLO for Vit A and Omega 3, zinc, selenium and iodine and B-vitamins, vit C, iron. I eat my two Brazil nuts (maximum, cause more can be too much selenium). And other food sources for the nutrients. Here is a list of nutrients to be sure are adequate in your diet: http://webhome.idirect.com/~wolfnowl/thyroid13.htm Hormones are also influenced greatly by the types of fats you eat. You need healthy saturated fats (avocado and coconut), and essential fatty acids: cod liver oil.

Iodine supplementation is another avenue to research: http://www.iodine4health.com/disease/disease.htm Here is more info about this important nutrient: http://www.mothering.com/discussions...&postcount=272 Kelp is the seaweed highest in iodine and for example, you would need approx. 1 teaspoon a day of www.seaveg.com kelp to get 12.5 mg. Iodized salt is not a good source. Real sea salt is good but not sufficient. Selenium in conjunction is important.


Adrenal fatigue is also interconnected with stress, cortisol exhaustion, and thyroid levels.

I'd also strongly recommend seeing a classical homeopath. Homeopathy can help to address hormonal balance.

My (limited) understanding is that the blood test for thyroid function is not as accurate for *bio-available* levels of thyroid function. See this old post of mine with more info: http://www.mothering.com/discussions...&postcount=984

The recommendation is to have *saliva* testing done for progesterone estrogen, testosterone, cortisol, AND thyroid.

The hormones are interconnected. Basically, the thyroid, progesterone, estrogen, testosterone and cortisol levels all need to be evaluated, as they change over the course of day.

Also, evening primrose and magnesium help with hormonal balance. Gut health is important to nutrient absorption which impacts hormone production and weight gain, new studies show.

So, I'd start with the "Healing The Gut-cheat sheet" at the top of the forum. http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=434071



HTH, Pat
post #131 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS View Post


Have you read this article by Dr. Abrahams explaining research on why he thinks it isn't?

The bioavailability of iodine applied to the skin

http://www.optimox.com/pics/Iodine/u...2/UNIOD_02.htm
I hadn't read that before. It's interesting though....clinically it seems to match up pretty well. I wouldn't ever rely on it, but how fast it disappears has correlated to levels of deficiency I've seen. Interesting. Why can't real life match up with data?
post #132 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Panserbjørne View Post
I see. I actually think that the skin test is a pretty good indicator. Now when you say it didn't absorb...over how long a period of time? 2 hours? 24? That makes a difference.

IF you had been getting iodine all along all the halides wouldn't have bothered you as much so it's still *possible* that you didn't need it. But I would be suprised!

Flouride doesnt' necessarily displace iodine. IT kinda has "first dibs" so to speak. Most studies I'm aware of show that the halides take up residence and bind to the receptor sites in the absence of iodine. The reason supplementation works is that it readily ousts the halides. However given your symptoms I'd be shocked if you had sufficient stores.
She said If I needed the iodine it would soak in immediately. I did it again today and it soaked in within a minute.
post #133 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS View Post
The ND might be interested to read Dr. Brownstein's Iodine book as it clearly explains that we are ALL deficient because of diet *and* toxins and why.
Hi JaneS

Yes I agree! I'm going to change my ND. She to has a thyroid problem and looks very unhealthy so I'm not sure she knows what shes doing exactly. Not to judge her but In that line of work you have to know what you're doing and I feel she doesn't :
post #134 of 236
Ah, see I don't think that way. For me I have people watch it over a 24 hour period. How fast it disappears really seems to correlate with the urine tests-at least IME.
post #135 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS View Post
The ND might be interested to read Dr. Brownstein's Iodine book as it clearly explains that we are ALL deficient because of diet *and* toxins and why.
What is their position on the current thinking that most Americans actually get several TIMES more iodine than the current USRDA for that mineral? Or that in peoples with iodine deficiency, you see goiters very commonly in the population, and this is almost unheard of in most Americans today?

I would be shocked to learn I don't get enough iodine. It's in the natural salt I eat a lot of and I eat a lot of fish too. I wonder if supplementing with extra iodine wouldn't be a really REALLY bad idea for me?
post #136 of 236
Not everyone is at risk, that is absolutely true. I have seen people tested who had no risk factors (in terms of no symptoms) and their urine tests came back fine. Its possible to NOT be iodine deficient.

However this is where it's important to understand the difference between pathological deficiency and subclinical deficiency. There is a spectrum. I for one would not want to wait until I had a goiter to address the problem if I had warning signs.
post #137 of 236
So if you have used sea salt exclusively for 10 years, don't eat sea vegetables to speak of, eat a very small amount of seafood, and make all food from scratch (thus no iodized salt at all), chances would be good that you need iodine? And an underactive thyroid without clinical hypothyroidism could correlate to iodine deficiency, with the patch test taking 1.5-2 hours to fully disappear?
post #138 of 236
I would say there's a very good chance, yes.
I'm still considering fish head and wild rice soup for iodine...
post #139 of 236
I would say the same.
post #140 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacquelineR View Post
I would say there's a very good chance, yes.
I'm still considering fish head and wild rice soup for iodine...
Chicken head broth is supposed to be magical for iodine also.


Pat
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Women's Health
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Women's Health  › My story, my cure...