or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at School › Do all Waldorfs use these terms?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Do all Waldorfs use these terms?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
The #1 thing bothering me about the Waldorf... First grade is such-and-such FABLES, all other years are MYTHS, except third grade is old testament STORIES.

My problem is that we are pagan, with an emphasis on Norse, so when we talk about Odin and Thor and Freya, these are REAL to us, and it really bugs me that my kid would hear these are MYTHS but the Old Testament has STORIES. Why can't they all be old stories? Would I be wasting my breath asking them to change this, or would they be considerate to our beliefs, or would it depend on the individual teacher?
post #2 of 5
How about exploring the word myth??? Yes, many times people do say it to mean something isn't factually true, but there are other definitions. The oxford dictionary includes this as a definition:

myth
· n.
1 a traditional story concerning the early history of a people or explaining a natural or social phenomenon, and typically involving supernatural beings or events.

– DERIVATIVES mythic adj. mythical adj. mythically adv.
– ORIGIN C19 (earlier (C17) as mythic): from mod. L. mythus, via late L. from Gk muthos.

I explained to my dd that the word means different things depending on who is saying it and in what context.

Talk to Waldorf if you want to, the worst they can do is disagree or refuse to change it. I have no experience with them so I can't say what is likely to happen.
post #3 of 5
I find these kind of terminologies a real problem. Why are ancient Greek stories called myths and Bible stories called real? I can remember when I figured out that the ancient Greeks felt their gods and goddesses were just as real as Xtians found Jesus to be.

Myself, I like to think of them all as sacred scripture. Even fairy tales. Sleeping Beauty, Snow White and Cinderella are goddess/god, animus/anima, coded alt Xtian (dubbed "heretical," wherein god needs to unite with a goddess to be complete and for both to awaken spiritually) stories, as well.

Or call them ALL myths. Myths are real, even if not factual/ historically accurate.
post #4 of 5

Waldorf was developed by a Christian man.

So it has Christian bias. Many Waldorf teachers are sensitive to this and they try to accomodate many beliefs in their classes. My son's class has several Jewish children in the class so there are a lot of Jewish Holidays celebrated along with Christian and Pagan holidays.

Talk with your teacher. I believe they are just using common terminology. Most people have a Judeao-Christian bias in their words and it is very common to hear Norse or Greek mythology as opposed to Old and New Testement stories. I think many teachers would be sensitive to your perspective.
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 

Re: Waldorf was developed by a Christian man.

Quote:
Originally posted by Rhonwyn
I think many teachers would be sensitive to your perspective.
Thanks, I was hoping to hear that. They say right on their website that it's Christian-based, but sensitive to other cultures and their songs may make mention of God, and I don't mind, (well I do, but I don't in the sense it's a con outweighted by the pros) but I would be happy if they just could call it stories, or even ledgends--at least ledgend implies it's based on truth or history, or may or may not be true.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Learning at School
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at School › Do all Waldorfs use these terms?