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Helping toddler cope with broken leg - Page 2

post #21 of 34
Just one more consideration -- right now, most kids are in school. Late July/August is PEAK time. Way, way more crowded. Is there any way to come up with a plan B for the other few days (like maybe do more days at the parks, or even Universal) instead of having them be water-based?

I understand your hesitation, though. I'm sure whichever way you go, it'll be fantastic.
-e
post #22 of 34
My daughter broke her leg as a toddler too.

We waitedc a week or two, and then went ahead with all our plans. We went to Gymboree class. We did all the things we normally would have done.

We used a red wagon a lot. It was the easiest place for her to sit with the cast on. But, even the umbrella stroller worked fine too.

The worst part was bath time. WHAT A DRAG! The whole experience was much worse for me than it was for her. Carrying her was uncomfortable because the edge of the cast stuck into my back.

SHe was supposed to be in the cast for eight weeks, but was out of it in about six weeks. She could NOT walk for a long time afterwards.. so when that happens, don't freak out. It's normal.

She walked in her cast, even though it wasn't a walking cast, but it was impossible to keep her off of it, and in the long run, she was fine.

She had some issues afterwards.. like not being able to run normally. SHe hopped and galloped everywhere. For almost four years. She had to learn to run without looking like a cartoon character.

But, all in all, it wasn't a bad experience, and she was more resiliant than I was.
post #23 of 34
Disneyland or Disneyworld? Either way, I'll bet there are a ton of things to do in the area the don't involve water. I don't know Orlando at all, but if it was Disneyland I can probably think of 4 or 5 days worth of local stuff that wouldn't involve water.

I know that my child was back to completely normal with 5 days of breaking his arm. She might be a little more tired, might need an occassional tylonal if its really painful, but I think cancelling trip would be premature and you might really regret it. Honestly, sounds like the perfect distraction!
post #24 of 34
When I broke my foot, I would easily have been able to do Disney by 11 days into it.

However, if the real reason for canceling is that you can't afford it and will better be able to afford it in a few months, and you think it would be more palatable to her if you present it as being an issue of her broken leg, that sounds fine too.
post #25 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lolar2 View Post
When I broke my foot, I would easily have been able to do Disney by 11 days into it.

However, if the real reason for canceling is that you can't afford it and will better be able to afford it in a few months, and you think it would be more palatable to her if you present it as being an issue of her broken leg, that sounds fine too.
No, quite the opposite. It will be more difficult to afford it in a few months, because of the costs of changing our tickets, her being over three, and so on. The "real reason" is that we want her to have the time of her life. As I said above, there's SO much stuff she can't participate in because of her food allergies that we specifically planned a trip to Disney because she could "do" everything, including eat in their restaurants (they're amazing with food allergic kids, even those as allergic as dd). We're going to the orthopedist on Monday, so we'll have a clearer picture of what we can/should do with her.

I'm not sure what your situation was with your foot, but she's in a full leg cast, and, because she's a toddler, she's not able to use crutches.

For the PP who asked, it's Disneyworld, not Disneyland.
post #26 of 34
I would ask the orthopedist if they'd be willing to recast her with a waterproof cast.
post #27 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by snoopy5386 View Post
I would ask the orthopedist if they'd be willing to recast her with a waterproof cast.
I'll see what he thinks--I'm not sure that it would be good for her to get the cast "off", only to have a new one put on. She's having a little trouble understanding that it's there to stay for awhile and not like her other "band-aids". But definitely worth inquiring. It's actually the sand I'm concerned about! I mean, we would have gone into the ocean with her a little and taken her under the waterfalls of the hotel pool, but she can't swim, so we could avoid the water if we had to. Making sandcastles, however, is one of her favorite activities and she LOVES the beach (this would be her second chance to go to one--and her last chance for a couple of years at least).

Right now, I'm actually leaning toward going (although with reservations). I mean, we gotta do something with her while she's in the cast, and Disney is certainly more fun that watching videos all day (which she has no patience for anyway, we're TV-free and I've only found one DVD that she'll tolerate).
post #28 of 34
Just to reiterate, Disney is extremely, extremely disability-friendly. I understand that it will limit her water-ride potential if she can't get re-cast in a waterproof cast. However, everything else should be completely do-able. Some people I knew in college specifically timed their Disney trip to be able to go with their friend who has muscular dystrophy, partly so they wouldn't have to wait in line.
post #29 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCVeg View Post
I'm not sure what your situation was with your foot, but she's in a full leg cast, and, because she's a toddler, she's not able to use crutches.
Our ortho put DD in a crawl/ walking cast because he thinks little ones should not use crutches, either..... How long 'till the ortho thinks your LO will be up and moving about? Is she only going to have one cast for the entire time? When DD broke her leg at 18 months, she was actually in 3 different casts, with a new one every two or three weeks. The ortho made it sound like that was very common practice for little kids. Getting it re-cast isn't that big of a deal, especially if it's going to happen a few times, anyway (but I'd prepare your LO for the saw, though... it FREAKED DD out the first time.)
I'd really think hard about going... to me it sounds like the positives of the trip will still outweigh the negatives... allergy safe food, rides, the pool (with the waterproof cast), etc. sounds like way more fun than having to wait, pay more, wait in VERY LONG lines, etc.
Good luck, and I hope your LO feels up to more activities, soon. DD fingerpainted a TON those first few days.
~maddymama
post #30 of 34
Our doctor would not put my daughter in a waterproof full leg cast. They did give me an aftermarket plastic thing called DryCast, which is basically a big plastic bag that keeps the water out. My DD doesn't like it, though, because the top part that goes around her upper thigh is too tight.

Maybe instead of the beach you can go to Animal Kingdom? My kids loved seeing all the animals there, the safari tours are great. Definitely do a character breakfast. There will be so many distractions that I'm sure she will be thinking more of all the things she is doing rather than what she can't.
post #31 of 34
No advice, NYC, just popping in to say I'm sorry about your DD! Rotten timing. to you and her.
post #32 of 34
Oh no,mama Keeping you in my thoughts!
post #33 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agatha_Ann View Post
I wanted to tell you though that my cousin broke her leg right before a Disney trip and not only did she get a great wheel chair from a medical supply rental, but once at Disney World they didn't ever have to wait in lines!
What she is speaking of is probably a Guest Assistance Card. We just got back from Disney World a week ago and had this pass (my son has a disability). This is a special pass for guests with disabilities. It is NOT used to ensure you get on a ride right away and don't have to wait in lines, and they will tell you that. However, in experience, it drastically reduces the time you wait in line and you almost always enter in a different entrance. If you have a stroller you want to take and use with her you can do that. They will give you a sticker to place on your stroller that will let all park employees know that the stroller is being used as a wheelchair and you will be able to wheel it up to each ride, just as you would a wheelchair. We did this with my son one day and it was great
post #34 of 34
I just want to say that I hope her healing time passes quickly and that she heals well.

If you won't be losing a lot of money by rescheduling/canceling, then I would probably do that. For one thing, if you wait until she's a little older, she'll have lasting memories of the trip.

I'm not sure how true it is but some of my friends said that flying with a leg or foot in a cast was painful for them. The change in pressure caused temporary swelling or something...Not good when there's a cast on. Talk to the orthopedic specialist about it.
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