or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Arts & Crafts › Books, Music, and Media › May 2009 Book Challenge
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

May 2009 Book Challenge - Page 10

post #181 of 192
#27 Graceling by Kristen Cashore

As others on the list have already read this, I won't say much. I did enjoy it, but it wasn't earth-shatteringly great to me.
post #182 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
We're moving this weekend so I thought I'd get June's thread up and running before the move just in case our internet provider doesn't come through as promised and it takes a few days to get back online reliably.

So, June's thread is here: http://www.mothering.com/discussions...php?p=13847917, and I'll see all y'all after the move.
Thanks NCD, and good luck! Welcome back to the PNW!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
It's been a while since I read it (like maybe before we moved states, which feels like a lifetime ago.). I think, if nothing else, she made me feel less concerned about fats. It would be interesting to read it again, especially as I've gained two vegan friends in the meantime....
While I wouldn't use the word vilify or anything, she's pretty down on vegan diets, especially for pregnant women, lactating women and children, it seems like.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
No such thing, but thank you for the sentiment anyway.
Aw, it can't be that bad! Although, Cathe mentioned moving your books, that might be the crux of the thing! Books are heavy!

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbond View Post
#25 The Girl with the Dragoon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson

I loved this book! I couldn't put it down and really had to stop myself from skipping to the end because I wanted to know what happened.

A gripping, complex mystery with great characters. The basic premise of the book is a closed island mystery, but it goes so much deeper than that. It's also set in Sweden, which is an unusual locale for this sort of thing.

I can't wait to read the other two books that Larsson has written.
This is on my to read soon list

Quote:
Originally Posted by kaliki_kila View Post
I love this book, it is as hilarious as everyone says. Please read it!
As soon as I finish my book club book, American Chica and a couple other library ones that are due back, I'm all over it!

#24 (I think?)
oops #25 American Chica by Marie Aranas

I am almost done. I am really enjoying this book. It's a memoir by a woman who grew up in Peru, but her mom is from Wyoming/Seattle and her parents met in Boston. She talks a lot about the dichotomy of cultures in her life.
post #183 of 192
#27 - Kafka Comes to America: Fighting for Justice in the War on Terror by Steven T. Wax

Wax is a federal public defender in Oregon. He writes about the legal framework of the war on terror in the context of his defence of Brandon Mayfield, a local lawyer wrongfully imprisoned on a material witness warrant because his fingerprint has been misidentified on a bag of detonators used in the Madrid subway bombing, and his defence of Adel Hamad, an innocent Sudanese aid worker seized in Pakistan, tortured on a US base in Afghanistan, and held for years without charges in Guantanamo.

Wax isn't a great writer, but the subject matter is important and it's hard not to be gripped by it despite the rather flat prose. The contrast between the eventual outcome for Mayfield, whose case stayed within the conventional criminal justice system, and Hamad, who had essentially no access to due process in Guantanamo, is striking.

#28 - Put On By Cunning by Ruth Rendell

Nice British mystery, fun, quick read.
post #184 of 192
#28 The Forest of Hands and Teeth by Carrie Ryan

Today has been a good reading day. This is a YA about the world after the Zombies basically win. It's also about memory and history and how we know who we are. I enjoyed it immensely.
post #185 of 192
Okay -- my last May book.

Chocolat by Joanne Harris

So some friends and I read Enchanted April and watched the movie for the library reading program and it was so fun, we decided to try it again. We're going to get together next weekend to watch the movie and eat chocolate fondue.

The book was enjoyable enough -- about a women who comes to a uptight town in France and shakes things up a bit.
post #186 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbond View Post
#28 The Forest of Hands and Teeth by Carrie Ryan

Today has been a good reading day. This is a YA about the world after the Zombies basically win. It's also about memory and history and how we know who we are. I enjoyed it immensely.
I liked this one, too.

44. Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog) by Jerome K. Jerome

I already returned it to the library, else I would be plaguing you with quotes. Almost the whole book was amusing and relevant and quotable. This quote on Wikipedia says it all: "One of the most praised things about Three Men in a Boat is how undated it appears to modern readers, the jokes seem fresh and witty even today."
post #187 of 192
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
I can't even imagine having to move all your books!
Most of a 25-foot truck was either bookshelves or boxes of books. I'm not looking forward to doing it again when we head to WA in August.
post #188 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaliki_kila View Post

44. Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog) by Jerome K. Jerome

I already returned it to the library, else I would be plaguing you with quotes. Almost the whole book was amusing and relevant and quotable. This quote on Wikipedia says it all: "One of the most praised things about Three Men in a Boat is how undated it appears to modern readers, the jokes seem fresh and witty even today."
Oh--that sounds good. I'm going to request it from the library.
post #189 of 192
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaliki_kila View Post
44. Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog) by Jerome K. Jerome

I already returned it to the library, else I would be plaguing you with quotes. Almost the whole book was amusing and relevant and quotable. This quote on Wikipedia says it all: "One of the most praised things about Three Men in a Boat is how undated it appears to modern readers, the jokes seem fresh and witty even today."
I missed this one somehow. Connie Willis wrote a science fiction/time travel novel titled To Say Nothing of the Dog that borrows heavily from Jerome's novel. It is quite fascinating.
post #190 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
I missed this one somehow. Connie Willis wrote a science fiction/time travel novel titled To Say Nothing of the Dog that borrows heavily from Jerome's novel. It is quite fascinating.
Have you read both, NCD? I've only read Connie Willis's, and I found it amusing but like most of her work - kind of annoying. I really want to like her, but I always feel like her stuff (especially The Doomsday Book and Passage) were unbelievably emotionally manipulative. And annoying. Did I say annoying?
post #191 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
I missed this one somehow. Connie Willis wrote a science fiction/time travel novel titled To Say Nothing of the Dog that borrows heavily from Jerome's novel. It is quite fascinating.
Thanks! Gonna get this one from the library so I can revisit the characters, especially Montmorency. I fell in love with that dumb dog after he bit the hissing teakettle and burned his mouth.
post #192 of 192
#9 The Inheritance of Loss by Kiran Desai

I barely finished this in time to make the May list! I know this book won all kinds of awards, but I found it really hard to get through. Not very compelling. I didn't find myself caring about the characters much. The history/cultural aspects of it were interesting, but the story itself and the characters left, for me at least, a lot to be desired.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Books, Music, and Media
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Arts & Crafts › Books, Music, and Media › May 2009 Book Challenge