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May 2009 Book Challenge - Page 3

post #41 of 192
#25 - Means of Evil by Ruth Rendell

This was a short story collection featuring Rendell's Inspector Wexford. Defiintely a change after reading Salman Rushdie! For mystery short stories, they were very well-developed in terms of character and plot. Not earth shaking, but pleasant.
post #42 of 192
Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

i really enjoyed this! i have requested the sequel from the library. it is a graphic novel that tells of the growing up years of the author, who was born in Iran just before the revolution and Iran/Iraq war. you really get a solid sense of the human cost of war, while also seeing the ways that kids are kids everywhere. i liked the art style a lot.
post #43 of 192
Bad Mother by Ayelet Waldman

I enjoyed this book of essays on motherhood--and how hard it is to live up to the expectations of what a "good mother" is supposed to be. Waldman is very honest and writes about things that are obviously painful--but a lot of it is funny too.
post #44 of 192
The Silver Swan by Benjamin Black

An Irish mystery about a pathologist who gets mixed up in a suicide but can't help investigating to find out what really happened. Good characters and good plot/story. One thing that annoyed me, however, was that they kept referring to things that happened in the previous book (which I hadn't read and didn't know there was--it does not say this is part of a series anywhere on the book) so I kept feeling like I should know what they were referring too.
post #45 of 192
#4 Atonement by Ian McEwan

Not as good as I thought it'd be after the great reviews it got. I thought the characterization was pretty good. And the premise and plot were fascinating.

But there were WAY too many details and descriptions that weren't always necessary and, oftentimes, detracted from the plot/action of the book. Say, for example, a character walked into a room to confront someone else. Instead of letting the dialogue and action proceed to build momentum and excitement, there might be a long recollection of that character, or a detailed description of something, and the break in the action really weakened the story, I thought.

I found myself skimming long descriptive passages instead of reading them in detail and savoring them.

I do want to see the movie now, though.
post #46 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by kangamitroo View Post
Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

i really enjoyed this! i have requested the sequel from the library. it is a graphic novel that tells of the growing up years of the author, who was born in Iran just before the revolution and Iran/Iraq war. you really get a solid sense of the human cost of war, while also seeing the ways that kids are kids everywhere. i liked the art style a lot.
I loved this book too! The movie was fun as well. I loved hearing Marjane Satrapi talk in the special features too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by greeny View Post
#4 Atonement by Ian McEwan

Not as good as I thought it'd be after the great reviews it got. I thought the characterization was pretty good. And the premise and plot were fascinating.

But there were WAY too many details and descriptions that weren't always necessary and, oftentimes, detracted from the plot/action of the book. Say, for example, a character walked into a room to confront someone else. Instead of letting the dialogue and action proceed to build momentum and excitement, there might be a long recollection of that character, or a detailed description of something, and the break in the action really weakened the story, I thought.

I found myself skimming long descriptive passages instead of reading them in detail and savoring them.

I do want to see the movie now, though.
I enjoyed this book as well, but had a really hard time getting going on it, b/c I couldn't believe how much I had to read before we moved on from the first day in the story. I thought, sheesh, do we have to analyze the entire day from every.single.perspective? Then I realized, yes, for this story, we do

It is pretty detailed though at times isnt it? I ended up liking that after a while....


#18 My Jim by Nancy Rawles

A short novel inspired by the character of Jim in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The story is told from the perspective of Sadie, Jim's wife, as she tells the story of her life to her granddaughter. It was a tragic story that made me so sad at times, the remembering of being a slave and the horrific things that happened in their lives. But there was also so much strength in this story.

It's our Seattle Reads library pick for the city this year. I can see why. It's a good one. Persepolis was a pick a few years ago.
post #47 of 192
Remember when so many of us read The Book of Lost Things by John Connelly?

I would love to read another of his books, does anyone have any recommendations? He seems to have quite a few books......
post #48 of 192
#5. Out Stealing Horses by Per Petterson

I read this for book club, and might never have picked it up on my own. But man am I glad I read this! What a deceptively simple book! What an amazing creation! The prose is simple and minimalist, which I love, and the story is compelling and important.

I don't want to give too much away, but I really loved this book. I'm excited to discuss it tonight!
post #49 of 192
The Chosen One by Carol Lynch Williams

This was a great -- about a 13 year old girl in a polygamist community who is forced to marry her uncle who is about 50 years older than her. Very well written and very good.
post #50 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by greeny View Post
#5. Out Stealing Horses by Per Petterson

I read this for book club, and might never have picked it up on my own. But man am I glad I read this! What a deceptively simple book! What an amazing creation! The prose is simple and minimalist, which I love, and the story is compelling and important.

I don't want to give too much away, but I really loved this book. I'm excited to discuss it tonight!
My stepmom read this one and had a similar opinion. She really enjoyed it. It's on my list of books to read
post #51 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammastar2 View Post
#25 - Means of Evil by Ruth Rendell

This was a short story collection featuring Rendell's Inspector Wexford. Defiintely a change after reading Salman Rushdie! For mystery short stories, they were very well-developed in terms of character and plot. Not earth shaking, but pleasant.
Good to hear -- Rendell is on my Amazon recommendations, so maybe I'd better check her out!
post #52 of 192
Quote:
The Chosen One by Carol Lynch Williams

This was a great -- about a 13 year old girl in a polygamist community who is forced to marry her uncle who is about 50 years older than her. Very well written and very good.
This sounds interesting. Is it fiction or nonfiction? (Off to amazon.com to look it up.....)
post #53 of 192
It's non-fiction. I'm not sure if it's actually out yet. I got an advance copy to review.
post #54 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by kangamitroo View Post
Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

i really enjoyed this! i have requested the sequel from the library. it is a graphic novel that tells of the growing up years of the author, who was born in Iran just before the revolution and Iran/Iraq war. you really get a solid sense of the human cost of war, while also seeing the ways that kids are kids everywhere. i liked the art style a lot.
I loved this and the sequel. I haven't seen the movie yet. It really provides a good perspective on the politics of Iran and Iraq.

Animal Vegetable Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver

This was mentioned last month, but I am coming at it from the perspective of a small produce farmer, so I am so happy this book is out there. Not only is Kingsolver a wonderful and amusing writer, she makes a really strong case for eating locally and just changing the way we think about food. I particularly like the discussion on vegetarianism and the ethics of killing animals for food. And since it's based on her "year of food life" it's not preachy, but filled with her family's experiences. I highly, highly recommend this book to everyone.
post #55 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by katmann View Post
Animal Vegetable Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver
I particularly like the discussion on vegetarianism and the ethics of killing animals for food.
Ha! That's so funny, I loved this book too, but that was the part that I particularly hated!
post #56 of 192
1.A Kiss of Shadows
2. A Caress of Twilight both by Laurell K. Hamilton

I like them. I am easy to please I guess (heard that a lot of people didn't like them) These are the first two book in a fantasy series by the same author that wrote the Anita Blake series. These books are very explicit and listed under "Erotic" genera on the paperback book swap site. I like a little action so it doesn't bother me, just an FWI for those that don't want to read that kind of stuff I love stories that mix fantasy creatures in with real life. Like with the Sookie books. Not only do Vampires exist, everyone knows about them and they are a part of society. In the Meredith gentry books it is fairies or fey (and a hole lot of others)

Quote:
Meredith NicEssus is a faerie princess turned private investigator in a world where faeries are not only known to the general public, but are also fashionable. She takes on the pseudonym "Meredith Gentry" to hide from her family and her past while hiding out in Los Angeles, California as a private investigator at Grey's Detective Agency. Merry, the only Sidhe royal to be born on American soil, fearing the continuous assassination attempts on her life thinly disguised as duels, flees the Unseelie Court in a final act of self-preservation. Her glamour (the art of magical disguise through illusion) is nearly unrivaled at court, and she is able to pass herself off as a human with fey blood.
eta:
Quote:
Originally Posted by candipooh View Post
1.A Kiss of Shadows
2. A Caress of Twilight both by Laurell K. Hamilton

I like them. I am easy to please I guess (heard that a lot of people didn't like them) These are the first two book in a fantasy series by the same author that wrote the Anita Blake series. These books are very explicit and listed under "Erotic" genera on the paperback book swap site. I like a little action so it doesn't bother me, just an FWI for those that don't want to read that kind of stuff I love stories that mix fantasy creatures in with real life. Like with the Sookie books. Not only do Vampires exist, everyone knows about them and they are a part of society. In the Meredith gentry books it is fairies or fey (and a hole lot of others)

This years books
1-Harry Potter and the half Blood Prince
2-Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

-Sookie Stockhose books
3-Dead Until Dark
4-Living Dead in Dallas
5-Club Dead
6-Dead to the World
7-Dead as a Doornail
8-Definitely Dead
9-All Together Dead
10-From Dead to Worse

11-The Trumpet and the Swan

12-Wrinkle in Time

-Queen Betsy books
13.Undead and Unwed
14.Undead and Unemployed
15.Undead and Unappreciated
16.Undead and Unreturnable
17.Undead and Unpopular
18.Undead and Uneasy
19.Undead and Unworthy

-Meredith Gentry books
20-A Kiss of Shadows
21-A Caress of Twilight
post #57 of 192
The Big Over Easy, a Nursery Crime, Jasper Fforde
light, entertaining fast red. i loved the Fforde books (literary series) so thought i would try this one. fun!


1. Club Dead, Charlaine Harris. #3 of the Southern Vampire Series.
2. Dead to the World #4 of the Southern Vampire Series.
3. Dead as a Doornail, book #5 of teh Southern Vampire Series.
4. Holidays on Ice, David Sedaris.
5. Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins.
6. Life as We Knew It
7. Definitely Dead #6 of the Southern Vampire Series.
8. A Thousand Splendid Sunsets
9. All Together Dead #7 of the Southern Vampire Series
10.Graceling
11. David Sedaris: Live at Carnegie Hall.
12. Star Beast, Robert Heinlein
13. Water for Elephants, Sara Gruen
14. When You Are Engulfed In Flames, David Sedaris
15. From Dead to Worse, #8 Southern Vampire Series
16. Animal Vegetable Miracle
17. Pride and Prejudice, Austin
18. Harry Potter #2
19. The Big Over Easy, a Nursery Crime, Jasper Fforde
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post #58 of 192
Thread Starter 
post #59 of 192
Persepolis 2 by Marjane Satrapi
i have known many people who lived in the US while family back home dealt with chaotic situations, and Satrapi's portrayal is heartfelt. as i read this i thought of a Persian friend in Barcelona, she moved there in the 60s. she is bahai and her family would have suffered tremendously. but to give up your home....yikes.
Satrapi confessed things she did as a young adult that felt shameful, and i hate to say but i related to that, found i was thinking about things i won't ever tell my mom. (abracadabra, right now, i let it go. forgived.)

watch me avoid housework and job applications like a fiend. next up, Persepolis the movie
post #60 of 192
I'm not doing quite so well this month.

Harry Potter and the Socerer's Stone
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
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