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Do you let your child drink coca cola? - Page 8

post #141 of 185
We have soda in the house, mainly for DP but sometimes for me. DD isn't "allowed" it, as in i'd never ever give her a can, but she has sipped it. She really likes coke zero unfortunately (it's what i drink if i have soda)!

As a kid we never had bottles of it around the house, but were allowed to orderit whn we were out and my weight and teeth and general health are ok, so i'm not too afraid of going the same way with DD. She will always choose juice for preference, so i often offer "milk or water?" if i feel she's had enough juice or if it's between meals. At the moment we are all enjoying organic apple juice which we dilute.

It does make me really sad to see little babies with bottles or sippies with soda in, especially when the older siblings have mouths full of greying teeth, or the mum is screaming at them for acting like they've had a ton of sugar and caffiene when, well, they HAVE.
post #142 of 185
Never.

They do get to have Hansen's natural soda for their birthday parties and our local pizza place makes its own fruit soda which they get very occasionally as a treat.

But coke, pepsi and the like? No.

And by the way, soda was pretty much banned in my house growing up. It did not become "forbidden fruit" for me. What happened was that I never developed a taste for it. Soda was there for the taking in my college cafeteria and I never drank it.
post #143 of 185
DS is almost 10 months old and he has tried soda....I think it was root beer though, not coca cola...definitely decaffeinated soda. I just gave him a little sip out of my straw. We don't normally have soda in our house, only because DH and I don't drink it much so it isn't like he has access to it daily. I don't think it is something he should drink daily but a sip now and then as a special treat is not going to hurt him.
post #144 of 185
My childern are allowed to have soda occasionally
post #145 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by zinemama View Post
And by the way, soda was pretty much banned in my house growing up. It did not become "forbidden fruit" for me. What happened was that I never developed a taste for it.
thank you for mentioning this. I hate when people use the forbidden fruit arguement to try to explain giving things that aren't nessesary and are very unhealthy and useless for growth or positive result. For example alcohol would have been a HUGE offense for my brother and I to drink growing up... even a sip. However, not once have I been tempted or wanted to drink it and now at almost age 25 I've easily still never had a sip (and never will). Maybe people who do give in and try something that was forbidden as a child THINK they tried it at a bad time for that reason but, I'm sure if they were the kind of person to OD on that particular something they would have done it reguardless of their parent's stand on the issue. IF ANYTHING, I think giving something early makes addiction more likely and early onset.

If you explain to kids WHY they can't and shouldn't have something on a scientific or truthful basis they are less probably much less likely to choose that item as their rebelion down the road. I knew WHY I couldn't and shouldn't drink alcohol and those are the same reasons I still don't have it today. However, I was allowed to have pop growing up and when I learned how damaging it was to me, it was pretty rough quitting it cold turkey at age 18 or so. If I'd never had it that transition could have been avoided. Life isn't easier when you make your mistakes early... it's easier when you never make them!
post #146 of 185
When my ds was 2, he wouldn't drink anything and was actually close to being admitted to the hospital for fluids. His dr told me to to give him sprite so we did. Other than that, its only VERY recently (as in...the last month) that he's been allowed to have 1/4 cup of any soda, and its always clear and no caf. My mom is always sneaking him Caf. Free Diet Coke and thinks its the same as water... *sigh*
Special treats. Like, really special.
post #147 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by zinemama View Post
And by the way, soda was pretty much banned in my house growing up. It did not become "forbidden fruit" for me. What happened was that I never developed a taste for it. Soda was there for the taking in my college cafeteria and I never drank it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by FondestBianca View Post
thank you for mentioning this. I hate when people use the forbidden fruit arguement to try to explain giving things that aren't nessesary and are very unhealthy and useless for growth or positive result.
Of course YMMV, but growing up - all junk/pop/sweets were totally banned, and I went absolutely nuts gorging myself when I moved out. I think I ate fast food and drank Diet C*ke for a year straight. So, while I'm not saying that this would be true for all people - it does happen. Most of the girls I lived in rez with had the same experience - things that were verboten became the one thing they wanted to try or experiment with...
post #148 of 185
Quote:
I think I ate fast food and drank Diet C*ke for a year straight. So, while I'm not saying that this would be true for all people - it does happen. Most of the girls I lived in rez with had the same experience - things that were verboten became the one thing they wanted to try or experiment with...
Isn't this very common though (fresher 15?) I certainly gained weight when i went to uni and there was nothing banned in my home growing up - they didn't buy soda but i was allowed to have it if there was any. For me it was more that i was "playing" at being a grown-up for the first year or so after i left home (i was 17) and so i didn't look after myself very well. I was about 19 before i began cooking (and i'd been cooking since i was about 10 for the family!) for myself and thinking about my health and so on. I would think the eating of crap in our current society can be likened to the phase of new independance in ANY species. Lots of teenaged hunting mammals go through skinny phases while they find their feet. It's just that for humans "hunting" a take-away doesn't seem as taxing as gathering some fruit...
post #149 of 185
Nope, they are 5 and almost 2. I think thier dad let the 5 year old order Orange Soda out to eat once when I was not with them.
post #150 of 185
Growing up, we only had diet cola to drink. Mom was too cheap to buy milk and we hardly drank water since our well water sucked. I think we went through a few 2 liter bottles a day for a family of 4. In our family, pop is an occasional treat but we have it more than I like (a few times a month; the kids will usually have a cup or less from a big bottle). The kids have had coke, but not often. To them pop is pop. Eating out, they'll usually get milk. At home we drink water 95% of the time. Juice is a treat too.
post #151 of 185
Quote:
natrually flavored soda I recommend Jarritos
My kids adore those. It's their treat if they happen to accompany me to the farmer's market.
post #152 of 185
As far as the forbidden fruit argument, I grew up on fast food and soda and chips AND lots of processed garbage "diet" food and now weigh 290lbs. I don't want my kids developing a taste for this food. By the time they're older, I won't put food restrictions on them (like maybe 8 or 9ish, it depends, I'm not there yet ) my hope is that they don't like it and most certainly don't crave it.

My cousin lets her children eat whatever they want and her 3 year old ate an entire package of oreos the other day. That is not normal. She said he was sick but just kept on eating. For me this is more than "oh it's a little treat!" it's more like a man made poison created to be addicting. People are always confused by why I let my son eat homemade cupcakes but not bakery cakes. Or some ice creams but not others. Because I don't see anything wrong with natural foods.

I also don't say "you can't have that!" we talk about it. My son asks me "is this food healthy for my body?" before he eats it. I've also always trusted their hunger signals which I think is important, and I think these foods can disrupt those hunger signals.

For the record, my cousins children are rail thin. They eat a ton of sugar and fast food at least 4 meals a week. So for my kids it's not even that I don't want them to suffer their lives with obesity like I do, but I want them to be genuinely healthy.
post #153 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceinwen View Post
Of course YMMV, but growing up - all junk/pop/sweets were totally banned, and I went absolutely nuts gorging myself when I moved out. I think I ate fast food and drank Diet C*ke for a year straight. So, while I'm not saying that this would be true for all people - it does happen. Most of the girls I lived in rez with had the same experience - things that were verboten became the one thing they wanted to try or experiment with...
I do agree that it can go either way. I think maybe a lot depends on what alternatives are around. Soda wasn't the only thing banned in my house. We never had any junk food: chips, store-bought cookies or fast food, etc.

However, we did have plenty of yummy other stuff: homemade cakes, pies and cookies, pancakes and waffles with real maple syrup, good cheese and bread, from-scratch meals every night. As a consequence, that's what I developed a taste for. So that even when I was on my own and could buy and eat whatever I wanted to, I just didn't want to. Even now, although I love potato chips, I will rarely buy them.

(In fact, the only thing I did that went against the way I was raised was to have a TV for a few years after college. But when I got back from the Peace Corps I ditched it and haven't owned one in 20 years.)
post #154 of 185
No, in our house, soda is an unhealthy (ie. treat) adult drink. Also, our children have never liked the bubbles - we felt very fortunate for that. The exception is that once a year, for the past 3 years or so, our children (DS 10 and DD 7) have consumed a root beer float from Tom & Jerry's. My 10 year old has now asked for root beer on two or three other occasions (a birthday party, restaurants) and we have said, "sure", after checking to make sure it was caffeine free. I think there have been 2 or 3 other times that my son has tried natural sodas at various places, too, but was never much of a fan of them.

For us, this was the easiest healthy habit that we could instill in our children, choosing something OTHER than HFCS sodas to drink.
post #155 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by zinemama View Post
I do agree that it can go either way. I think maybe a lot depends on what alternatives are around. Soda wasn't the only thing banned in my house. We never had any junk food: chips, store-bought cookies or fast food, etc.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoBecGo View Post
Isn't this very common though (fresher 15?) I certainly gained weight when i went to uni and there was nothing banned in my home growing up - they didn't buy soda but i was allowed to have it if there was any. For me it was more that i was "playing" at being a grown-up for the first year or so after i left home (i was 17) and so i didn't look after myself very well.
Great, so it's just me! J/K, I definitely hear what both of you were saying. My mother was an amazing cook and baker growing up, so I really wish I had developed an affinity for healthier fare. So far, I'm working on it and making great strides... I agree with you GoBecGo that a lot most likely has to do with that 'breaking free' as a young adult issue...

And zinemama - totally OT, but I'm totally envious of your TV free status. I just cancelled my cable as a step in that direction, but I'm wondering if it would be easier to go cold turkey and ditch the TV altogether.
post #156 of 185
yuck. soda is so gross.
post #157 of 185
I am the bad mom. not only do my kids get the occasional soda (which ever type they want) but my step son is made to drink 1 diet coke before any activity that requires lots of concentration and his teacher even has a stash of diet coke for big tests at school.

My step son is autistic with severe ADHD and while he is on meds, the caffine in the soda does make a huge difference. He can concentrate and function at an almost typical level. I give him diet because the regular has too much sugar and then he crashes and gets aggitated.

Of course, these aren't daily occurances, but it happens at least once a week and it works for us. It would be that, or adding more meds which don't work as well. We did try coffee and other caffine filled drinks, but he doesn't like the taste.
post #158 of 185
We don't keep soda (unless DH has bought it for cocktails) at home and sometimes DH will order it at restaurants but I never do. I try really hard to keep us away from HFCS. DD has had sips of it before, but I can't imagine myself letting her order a glass while out to eat for a loooong, loooong time. Most likely never.
post #159 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by FondestBianca View Post
If you explain to kids WHY they can't and shouldn't have something on a scientific or truthful basis they are less probably much less likely to choose that item as their rebelion down the road. I knew WHY I couldn't and shouldn't drink alcohol and those are the same reasons I still don't have it today. However, I was allowed to have pop growing up and when I learned how damaging it was to me, it was pretty rough quitting it cold turkey at age 18 or so. If I'd never had it that transition could have been avoided. Life isn't easier when you make your mistakes early... it's easier when you never make them!
I really doubt that this is true. My mother explained about sex, alcohol, unhealthy foods, and drugs to us and I was determined to have sex and alcohol from the time I was a teenager. I was tempted by drugs briefly as a pre-teen but I never knew where to find them. I continue to struggle to not eat unhealthy foods even to this day. I think people develop tastes or aversions mostly because they develop tastes or aversions not because their parents do allow, don't allow, talk about, or don't talk about certain things.

It is good to give kids reasons for things you allow and don't allow because they are humans who deserve to know the reasons behind the rules in their life. It is naive to assume that you can prevent someone from developing a taste for something though just because you talk to them about why they shouldn't do it. It also implies that only the children of people who don't talk to their children are the ones who have children that do things that are bad for their body.
post #160 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by One_Girl View Post
I really doubt that this is true. My mother explained about sex, alcohol, unhealthy foods, and drugs to us and I was determined to have sex and alcohol from the time I was a teenager. I was tempted by drugs briefly as a pre-teen but I never knew where to find them. I continue to struggle to not eat unhealthy foods even to this day. I think people develop tastes or aversions mostly because they develop tastes or aversions not because their parents do allow, don't allow, talk about, or don't talk about certain things.

It is good to give kids reasons for things you allow and don't allow because they are humans who deserve to know the reasons behind the rules in their life. It is naive to assume that you can prevent someone from developing a taste for something though just because you talk to them about why they shouldn't do it. It also implies that only the children of people who don't talk to their children are the ones who have children that do things that are bad for their body.
I certainly didn't mean that is a prevent-all solution... simply said that I believe thats probably a better method for prevention that letting kids experiment with permission. Everyone is going to make different choices of course but allowing something CERTAINLY can't prevent anything. I don't think allowing kids to have something lessens the chance of them bingeing on it later. However, I do think there is a chance that not allowing and explaining why COULD prevent bingeing or creating a habit or addiction later on. Some chance is better than none!

My parents told me not to drive fast but when I turned 16 I still did it... excessively... until I totalled my first car 3 months later and REALLY learned my lesson. So no, the method I described didn't exactly work when it came to driving. It did work when it came to alcohol, drugs, and promiscuity. I'm pretty sure that if I had been given sips of alcohol as a child I would have formed a habit easily. Heck, I did it with soda and I'm pretty sure thats far less addictive. When I gave it up it wasn't fun or pretty or easy for quite awhile... why would I want to hand that probable task to my kids just for a few seconds of a half pleasing taste in their mouth??

ETA: for the record I put soda down on the naughty list under quite a few other nastier things. I don't hardly think it's evil nor are parents who allow it. I just think it's something all kids are much better off without.
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