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Where won't you shop/do business and why? - Page 3

post #41 of 211
ExxonMobil. Because they STILL have not paid that d**n fine, and have been complete UAVs over the issue.

I boycott Walmart because of the small-town killing. I have seen that first hand too - when they forced all the small stores out of business and then hired their employees. But of course they only hired them all part time so they wouldn't have to pay them benefits. Gah. Don't get me going on Walmart.

I try to boycott companies that still use transfats in their products. If I miss it on a label and find it later, I return the package to the store. I am an HCFS avoider, but every now and then there is something I buy that has it.

There are others but those are the ones that come to mind.
post #42 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by MommyTorf View Post
so i called both local natural food stores to price organic formula. having never used formula, and because i knew it would be short term, i felt like i needed to look into organic options. the MANager at one of the stores said to me, "have you ever even CONSIDERED breastfeeding?"
Wow, so they actually sell the product at their store, but if you so much as ask about the price they harass you? Nice.
There are so many very good reasons why a mother would want to or need to give her baby formula. I would think that if someone is buying or using formula it's best to assume that they have a good reason to use it, rather than assuming they are stupid or selfish as this person seemed to have done to you.
I'm all for educating about and promoting breastfeeding, but attacking people for even asking the price of a can of formula is not exactly promoting breastfeeding. I hope you helped open up that manager's eyes!

Jen
post #43 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turquesa View Post
And though I care about breast cancer, seeing a pink ribbon won't compel me to buy a tub of yogurt. If anything, I don't think it's fair for marketers to exploit our sense of conscience when only a teensy weensy amount goes to the cause.
I really hate when they don't even just donate the money, you have to then clean your lid and mail it in to them for them to donate the money. Like they want credit for THINKING about donating, but count on customer's laziness to get out of donating anyway.

I forget which yogurt did this, yoplait? They had the commercial with the feel-good soothing music and all those women mailing lids ... made me gag. Just donate!!!

eta - products I won't buy - I won't buy Kellogg's because I think the whole dropping their sponsorship over the pot thing was stupid... and I won't buy Breyer's because while they used to be "all natural" and really yummy, they have changed their recipe so their ice cream is glue-ier so they can whip more air in, and they have shrunk their packages saying they don't want to raise prices - sorry, you sell me less for the same price, you're raising prices. In other words, they bank on their customers being stupid. We only buy store brand ice cream now if we "need" ice cream because it tastes better and is still 1.75 quarts, which I know isn't as big as it used to be, but at least they haven't done the second wave of shrinkage yet. (And yes, yes, I know ice cream is not terribly important but sometimes, you just need ice cream... )

I also hate tropicana for the shrinkage thing - they choose to point out their new spout in hopes of detracting attention from the smaller package - but we don't avoid them as we never bought them in the first place... All right I guess my Kellogg boycott is ineffective for the same reason in that I don't think we ever bought them much in the first place - some morningstar farms, the occassional Eggo if Kashi was sold out - but when the pot thing happened, I thought "I hope a lot of people boycott Kellogg's" whereas with tropicana I just thought, "I am so sick of this package shrinking thing..."

re: boycotting Walmart being ineffectual and to a large degree just a cool thing to do - I agree. I have to wonder how many people boycott Walmart because it "killed the small town" but then will price shop on the internet ... so you buy it cheap from a web site which is somehow "better" ... if you shop at walmart, even if the company itself sucks, at least chances are your money goes to a person from your town as part of their pay check... That said, I don't shop at Walmart because it's further away than Target... I only go to Walmart if I have a random stuff run to make that includes fabric or crafty goods. I'm not really convinced Target is that much better, though - even if it is more socially acceptable. It's still a lot of crap goods made outside the USA and imported in, cheaply, which is really what the root of the problem is, or at any rate one of the bigger problems...
post #44 of 211
Thread Starter 
Clorox buying Burt's Bees isn't a deal breaker for me but it does make me worry about how it might affect their product. It will be a 'wait and see ' approach. I knew there had to be a reason WalMart suddenly started selling it.

Thanks for that website link! I didn't know they had something like that and it's really helpful. I love Gap (although don't shop there often) and thought they were a more conscionable establishment. Sad to see they aren't.
post #45 of 211
When Burt's Bees first came out with their products they didn't use artificial fragrances.....I don't know if they buy out changed that or if they did it before but I'm allergic to Burt's Bees' newer items.

RE: shopping at Walmart/Target...........there isn't a big box store except Safeway with in 75 miles of where I live....I shop locally and support smaller companies but if I'm buying something that is available everywhere - I will get the best price online.....
post #46 of 211
In the states, I try so hard to only shop at the small locally owned shops. We buy most of our children's clothes from thrift stores. We try to buy food at local markets or farmer's markets. I tend to disagree with pp who have said that where a company chooses to spend it's money doesn't matter. . .I'm sorry but I will boycott a company who gives money to organizations I find unethical. . .I don't want to line their pockets with my money (and granted it's a small amt. . .but those small amts from many people add up). In the states I will not shop at most large box stores. I will shop at Whole foods if that is my only option because as a whole I don't think they are an evil company. . .they've brought organic, whole foods to a larger population which I think is a good thing.

I also boycott diamonds (not that I buy them often. . .but I won't buy them at all now). I know there are a couple ethical companies out there selling them, but I can't afford most of them (and I'd much rather have a vacation instead).
post #47 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Funny Face View Post
I love Gap (although don't shop there often) and thought they were a more conscionable establishment. Sad to see they aren't.
They're actually one of the worst retailers out there and, yes, it is sad. I remember reports that their CEO was making $8 million/year PLUS $12 million in stock options, but their Cambodian workers were 'living' off of $0.20/hour (late 90s).



tragic.

and again.


sad.


ugh.

unbelievable.

another.

heart-breaking.


"On January 13-14, 1999, three separate lawsuits were filed challenging the unlawful sweatshop conditions in the Saipan, CNMI garment industry. A total of 26 U.S. based retailers and manufacturers have been sued for doing business in Saipan and using "indentured slavery." The 18 companies that have settled the lawsuit have agreed to abide by the new Saipan Code of Conduct which includes prohibiting Saipan-based contractors from violating the law in the future. It also requires factories to be monitored by Vérite, a non-profit Massachusetts based independent monitoring firm. In addition, the settlement calls for retroactive relief, payments to garment worker class members whose rights were violated in the past. With the 18 companies, the settlements have totaled almost $8.5 million. However, GAP, INC. and Chairman Donald Fisher still refuse to settle the lawsuit and will not take responsibility for cleaning up its horrible sweatshops and use of child labor."
post #48 of 211
RE: Whole Foods:
http://www.familyfarmdefenders.org/p...lmartOfOrganic

http://uprisingradio.org/home/?p=7860

http://www.slate.com/id/2138176/

"Another heading on the Whole Foods banner says "Help the Small Farmer." "Buying organic," it states, "supports the small, family farmers that make up a large percentage of organic food producers." This is semantic sleight of hand. As one small family farmer in Connecticut told me recently, "Almost all the organic food in this country comes out of California. And five or six big California farms dominate the whole industry." There's a widespread misperception in this country—one that organic growers, no matter how giant, happily encourage—that "organic" means "small family farmer." That hasn't been the case for years, certainly not since 1990, when the Department of Agriculture drew up its official guidelines for organic food. Whole Foods knows this well, and so the line about the "small family farmers that make up a large percentage of organic food producers" is sneaky. There are a lot of small, family-run organic farmers, but their share of the organic crop in this country, and of the produce sold at Whole Foods, is minuscule."
post #49 of 211
Thanks, MS, very informative.
post #50 of 211
I refuse to have anything to do with Network Associates. I've worked in IT for about 16-17 yrs and have fought damn hard to be respected in the field despite being a female. It's still an uphill battle in many companies, men are seen more as "belonging" in the field, whereas women tend to be seen as second string. We're finally making progress then a few years ago NA comes out with this line of ads that reduced women to nothing but sex symbols. I recall one where this beautiful lady in a suit (with a very revealing low cut top and skirt that was hiked halfway up her thighs) was giving a smoldering look at the camera and the caption was something like "I know what's on your hard drive". Thanks! Really needed that!

Walmart is a tough one for us. I dislike a lot of their practices, but they also provide the salary that allows my inlaws to live. Plus the truth is they are the least expensive in town (and we're really not in a position to be too picky) and the Target across the street is disgusting and dark. I do try to limit my visits there though.
post #51 of 211
I will not step foot in a WalMart and feel no need to justify that. I have not set foot in one in over 20 years, and have no reason to go there, they have nothing at all I need.

Some self-righteous people might act obnoxious about doing the same thing, I'm sorry they do that, but I'm not going to let that influence or deter me, or wear me down or make me throw up my hands in despair and give up.

Other big box retailers may be bad in similar ways, but I think it's pretty clear Walmart is the worst example, so I see no harm choosing not to shop there. I might not be able to change them, they might not "miss my money" but part of conscious living is just doing things thoughtfully and deliberately. I don't boycott them because I necessarily believe I can impact them, I just avoid them because they have absolutely nothing positive to add to my life. Even if they were not a force for social economic and ecological destruction (and they pretty clearly are that) they simply have nothing positive to add to my life, so they can't have my money. I refuse to give them a penny. If there are no other options, I buy nothing. Sometimes it's good to buy nothing.

The people I know who shop there have learned to set the bar too low in terms of product performance and durability - they get sucked in by a few "cheap prices" then like crack addicts they have to keep going back, they loose all sense of how long appliance and clothes and things should last and come to "need" that low price because they replace products WAY too often. They also seem to come up with hobbies based on what's available at that store, then again "need" to go there to get consumables for crafting. There are different ways to live and craft, living and crafting are much older than the big boxes.

You can't get the same things as cheap elsewhere, but you can get better things elsewhere, and end up spending the same amount of money on a smaller number of better things. Then you need less space to house your things, and less time to sort and dust them. :

The cheapness argument doesn't work. I know plenty of people with WAAAAAAYYY bigger incomes than mine who live a stressed and trashy lifestyle because they are addicted to Walmart. Shopping becomes a hobby for them, something they do instead of real hobbies.

Even though I'm poor I can't make cheapness too much of a priority. Stealing is cheaper than Walmart, but I won't do that either.

The shop local argument doesn't make sense to me either, unless you are also willing to buy crack or stolen bikes or stuff like that from local people who can't find other options than selling such things. Working at WalMart is obviously a better choice than selling crack, but they are on the same continuum of things people do when there are no really good options available to them. I don't think either thing genuinely helps the local economy.

OTOH online shopping, if it supports people making a living wage *somewhere* seems like a better option.

Don't let it get to you, the fact that no choice is perfect; that should deter us from being self-righteous, but not from trying our best, and being happy that at least we tried. Small battles
post #52 of 211
Whole Foods (here anyway) pays a living wage to it's employees. They start around $10. Home Depot also pays around 10/hour. I work for Target (have for a year) and I like it. I worked at Wal-Mart and really didnt'. I work part time and could have health insurance if I wanted it, among other benefits (including adoption services). Plus, I have MANY benefits I DON'T pay for, I have them by virtue of employment. I don't like what I am currently making, but they will pay for tuition when I return to school. They have stood by my side through one of my worse mental episodes on record. I would have lost my job months and months ago anywhere else. I really enjoy that I don't need to worry as much about my job while I'm in the throws of a near breakdown. I had a full fledged break down about 3 months before I was hired, and lost my job over it. I support my family on my pt wages.

Now, I boycott:
Kraft, ultra-pastuerized milk, Nestle, Ultimate Electronics (an episode that happened to my mom a few years ago....), any gas station except QuikTrip (they're local here, I LOVE LOVE LOVE them), McDonald's, those stores with religious symbols on door fronts, I can't think of others.

I try to support a local grocery chain, but the one closest to my house tends to have out of date items. I also tend to buy used clothes and other household items. I can't see paying so much for something brand new when there are other items that are still useful in thrift stores.

ETA: I also don't buy "branded" items: Seasame street, thomas, spnge bob, etc. I do buy movies but none of the marketing propaganda that goes with them.
post #53 of 211
Horizon dairy products...they have really bad practices.
post #54 of 211
"I won't shop at one of the locally owned, small business natural food stores in my town BECAUSE:

long story short, when DS was an infant, i got bit by a spider (HUGE, nasty bite- i almost couldn't walk. so gross!). my doctor prescribed a pretty heavy-hitting antibiotic (don't remember the name). i was an EPer (for one WHOLE year) and the pharmacist INSISTED that i should pump-and-dump. so i called both local natural food stores to price organic formula. having never used formula, and because i knew it would be short term, i felt like i needed to look into organic options. the MANager at one of the stores said to me, "have you ever even CONSIDERED breastfeeding?"



Quote:
Originally Posted by meemee View Post
: why i am not seeing how this was wrong. was it his snarky tone?
I guess I'm with you meemee.
post #55 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by erinsmama View Post
"I won't shop at one of the locally owned, small business natural food stores in my town BECAUSE:

long story short, when DS was an infant, i got bit by a spider (HUGE, nasty bite- i almost couldn't walk. so gross!). my doctor prescribed a pretty heavy-hitting antibiotic (don't remember the name). i was an EPer (for one WHOLE year) and the pharmacist INSISTED that i should pump-and-dump. so i called both local natural food stores to price organic formula. having never used formula, and because i knew it would be short term, i felt like i needed to look into organic options. the MANager at one of the stores said to me, "have you ever even CONSIDERED breastfeeding?"





I guess I'm with you meemee.

I'm not the one who posted this, but I went through hell to breastfeed my son a few ounces a day. I fought hard for 6 months through low supply, latch issues, food allergies, FTT despite supplementing with formula, and quite a few other problems. It really stings when someone puts you down for feeding your child formula when you want nothing more than to exclusively breastfeed. Pumping is also very very hard work and it takes a lot of determination to follow through with it long term. It's wrong when someone smarts off at you when they assume you haven't already done everything you can to give your child 100% breastmilk. It might not make sense to someone who hasn't walked in those shoes, but for me, not exclusively breastfeeding was a very painful and emotional ordeal. I grew to accept that I could never EBF, but comments from other people could still sting.
post #56 of 211
I boycott:


Wal-Mart because every shopping experience there has felt like the worst shopping experience ever. I never could find what I was looking for.

Nestle

ESCR and organizations that give money for that kind of research. I make sure to donate to ASCR programs, and encourage women to donate cord blood if they're having a hospital birth where the Dr will cut the cord before it's done pulsing.

Items made from or where the raw materials come from China. I feel many of the companies there have been irresponsible in their manufacturing processes.

If I can, I avoid buying plants and seeds that are connected to Monsanto, or any company that does business with Monsanto.

Child labor-free chocolate, and coffee if I can locate any.

I try to locate local resources for items and produce before buying mass produced items or produce. I also prefer hand-made items.
post #57 of 211
Generally, I try not to buy "stuff." I used to buy stuff at walmart and target... but then I realized that I didn't need the stuff and that the stuff wasn't made or sold using fair practices so I try to do without most stuff. If I'm not buying or "needing" it, I'm going into those stores.

I don't buy diamonds, no matter where they are mined. Even if they are certified conflict free, I'm not so sure that the environmental cost is worth the price of a bit of sparkle.

I mostly try to support businesses that are good for my community/the world/the environment instead of boycotting businesses that aren't.
post #58 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by RomanCarmelMom View Post
If I can, I avoid buying plants and seeds that are connected to Monsanto, or any company that does business with Monsanto.
Definitely! Forgot to add that one.
post #59 of 211
No Wal-Mart here. While Target might have some of the same oversees practices, at least they treat their domestic employees right.

No Kellogg's - circ. issues.

No HFCS.
post #60 of 211
Thank you, RomanCarmelMom. I was too upset to formulate a decent response. You summed it up for me. And yes, it was his absolutely SNARKY and DEGRADING tone.
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