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how do you feel montessori is similar/dissimilar to reggio A.

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
My child is in a montessori preschool and I am familiar with the philisophy. There is no option to continue with montessori at the primary level in my community. We are going with our local public catholic school system which is "reggio inspired", whatever that means. I have read a bit on it and it sounds like it is a play based learning idea. I have always thought of the hands on aspect of montessir as play based, although it is called work. They are learning through activites, which to me if you are enjoying what you are doing is playing. I'm interested ingetting some perspectives as to how montessori and reggio as similar and different.
post #2 of 27
I'm not an expert on Montessori ideas, but I'm more familiar with Reggio ideas. Both come from Northern Italy, and Montessori provided a lot of foundational philosophy for the Reggio preschools, so they have a certain amount in common.

Here's a link to an article about a preschool that was Montessori, and then began to move towards Reggio:

http://www.communityplaythings.com/r...riJourney.html

and a link to a preschool in BC that combines both:

http://www.alderwoodhouse.com/home.html


Amy
post #3 of 27
Thanks for those links!
post #4 of 27
I'm sure this is floating around MDC somewhere, but this article is a great resource about the differences between Waldorf, Montessori and Reggio Emilia
post #5 of 27
I am a Montessori teacher, who is obsessed with Reggio right now It's the type of artbased curriculum I use in my home. The main similarities are that they are child-centered, and that the learning is focused on process over product. Both give the child opportunities to explore with beautiful didactic materials.
post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3belles View Post
I am a Montessori teacher, who is obsessed with Reggio right now It's the type of artbased curriculum I use in my home. The main similarities are that they are child-centered, and that the learning is focused on process over product. Both give the child opportunities to explore with beautiful didactic materials.
Does "didactic material" not refer to the self-correcting type of work activities done in Montessori? To me, that would seem the very opposite of Reggio, which tried to enable very open-ended play and learning.

When I did an observation in a Montessori classroom, for school, I recall two children using a board with coloured wooden shapes. They were creating a fabulous imaginative pattern with the wooden pieces. The teacher strolled over and said, "Ah, I see where you are going wrong here," and proceeded to correct them. Apparantely that "work" station was not intended for creative outlet, but for laying pieces out in a rigid pre-determined and didactic pattern.

Although I have no experience in a real Reggio school (though I try to lean that way in my own) I would think that the children would have been allowed and encouraged to create a masterpiece with the wooden pieces. If they showed a particular enduring interest, more open-ended materials would be introduced to the classroom as an invitation to further exploration and creativity.

- K
post #7 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3belles View Post
I am a Montessori teacher, who is obsessed with Reggio right now It's the type of artbased curriculum I use in my home. The main similarities are that they are child-centered, and that the learning is focused on process over product. Both give the child opportunities to explore with beautiful didactic materials.
ME TOO! ME TOO!
I work at a Mont preschool now, after unschooling for a few years. I am also a painter so struggled with how to connect all these loves. So now I have finally found Reggio and I am now...
Thankfully the school I work with is so open-minded and more Reggio. Plus we are ready for a change! Now to convince them all to embrace it too...
post #8 of 27
Not an expert, but from my observations I see one main difference as this:

Montessori is very group focused, children all do the same activity at the same time and switch at the same time, progress more or less at the same pace, etc. And there is a big focus on functioning within the group.

Reggio seems to allow for more individuality and individual choice. There is some structure to things like snack time, or moving outside and back inside, but otherwise children are able to choose what they do, when they do it, how they do it, for how long they do it, and switch when they choose to whatever they choose. And there is a big emphasis on personal responsibility.
post #9 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by COVegMom View Post
Not an expert, but from my observations I see one main difference as this:

Montessori is very group focused, children all do the same activity at the same time and switch at the same time, progress more or less at the same pace, etc. And there is a big focus on functioning within the group.
No. Montessori is entirely individual. In some work, the children have an option to work together. There are a few matching games I can think of that are meant for 2 players. And I assume that most Montessori preschools will have some sort of circle time where they sing songs. My DD's does. But Montessori is supposed to be working entirely independently and at their own pace.
post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by KCMommy View Post
Does "didactic material" not refer to the self-correcting type of work activities done in Montessori? To me, that would seem the very opposite of Reggio, which tried to enable very open-ended play and learning.

When I did an observation in a Montessori classroom, for school, I recall two children using a board with coloured wooden shapes. They were creating a fabulous imaginative pattern with the wooden pieces. The teacher strolled over and said, "Ah, I see where you are going wrong here," and proceeded to correct them. Apparantely that "work" station was not intended for creative outlet, but for laying pieces out in a rigid pre-determined and didactic pattern.

Although I have no experience in a real Reggio school (though I try to lean that way in my own) I would think that the children would have been allowed and encouraged to create a masterpiece with the wooden pieces. If they showed a particular enduring interest, more open-ended materials would be introduced to the classroom as an invitation to further exploration and creativity.

- K
yes! absolutely. if the children at a reggio school went another way with the blocks they would observe to see where it would go and potentially ask questions or encourage group cooperation to see what other directions could be derived from it and could take the subject matter to a whole new direction, add materials, engage in further study, etc... (in theory, of course)
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzs View Post
yes! absolutely. if the children at a reggio school went another way with the blocks they would observe to see where it would go and potentially ask questions or encourage group cooperation to see what other directions could be derived from it and could take the subject matter to a whole new direction, add materials, engage in further study, etc... (in theory, of course)
Without a doubt, what both pp have said. I am also a Reggio trained teacher and that is one of the *big* differences between Montessori and Reggio.
post #12 of 27
bugginsmom.....
how did you get training in reggio?

i work in a "reggio" precshool but we pretty much just got some ongoing inservice from a consultant. i feel like alot of my co-workers either really balked at the change or really took it way too far and not at all in the right direction (i.e. reggio means letting every kid do whatever he wants and whenever with no boundaries....all at the same time! yikes.)

alot of what i'm doing in my room this year actually came from a montessori book b/c i felt like it gave me more concrete instruction (really thinking about how to enable the child....have plates that they can carry, be prepared with sponges for cleaning if they want to help wipe the table, etc...)

anyway, i have to do some learning for licensing (my degree is in economics ) so anything actually reggio or similar would be great!
post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzs View Post
bugginsmom.....
how did you get training in reggio?

i work in a "reggio" precshool but we pretty much just got some ongoing inservice from a consultant. i feel like alot of my co-workers either really balked at the change or really took it way too far and not at all in the right direction (i.e. reggio means letting every kid do whatever he wants and whenever with no boundaries....all at the same time! yikes.)

alot of what i'm doing in my room this year actually came from a montessori book b/c i felt like it gave me more concrete instruction (really thinking about how to enable the child....have plates that they can carry, be prepared with sponges for cleaning if they want to help wipe the table, etc...)

anyway, i have to do some learning for licensing (my degree is in economics ) so anything actually reggio or similar would be great!
When I was doing my undergraduate work (I have a BA in Early Childhood Development) my university was a part of the movement to bring Reggio to the U.S. and I spent four years working in our child development center on campus which was completely Reggio. We had many many workshops and training inservices with actual teachers from Italy, as well as our supervisors and directors spending time in Italy and bringing the information home. I contributed to the research my university published, etc. I was fortunate enough to meet and attend a workshop with Lela Gandini as well. Eventually I ended up in a public school system where I worked in a pilot program of Reggio for their EC department but budget cuts eventually closed out the program.

There is no formal Reggio certification that I know of at this time.
post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by COVegMom View Post
Not an expert, but from my observations I see one main difference as this:

Montessori is very group focused, children all do the same activity at the same time and switch at the same time, progress more or less at the same pace, etc. And there is a big focus on functioning within the group.
Uhhhhh.... ?????? Huh?

I'm just curious where that image of Montessori comes from.
post #15 of 27
I still know almost nothing about Reggio (sadly...just haven't found good websites on it nor people to talk to), but isn't most of the learning teacher provided? (Asking as a difference...not as a criticism, just to clarify). I honestly don't know so this is a question out of ignorance.

Just in Montessori, the materials are presented then the child chooses them at some point and works with them and makes discoveries. I'm wondering if that's similar to how Reggio Emelia does it.
post #16 of 27
Reggio- Emergent, project based curriculum- the children come up with an idea and then the children and teachers work to gather materials, work in different mediums and further their learning. It is very community oriented. Also, documentation of learning is really important. In fact, some schools due a reverse lesson plan where they note what they did, rather than what they are going to do.
Teachers are guides, and facilitators.
They look at the project from many angles and work as long as the children are interested.

Montessori- I wouldn't say Montessori is project based but emergent seems appropriate. Emergent as in, the child works in areas or use materials when they are ready. When they are done with a material or have mastered a skill they move on.

I think you can blend both ideas into a program. In fact, that is what I am attempting to do. You need to be clear on what works in both programs and how you are implementing the ideas. In fact, I think that children benefit from the more controlled environment of Montessori, with the more art and community based learning of Reggio, because it creates balance.
post #17 of 27

I am currently a university student learning about the many different styles of teaching.  I have done a lot of research about the differences between Montessori and Reggio and am a big fan of Reggio's style of teaching.

 

Both schools provide a lot of hands on experience and individulaized learning however Reggio allows for a bit more group work. Reggio has a greater focus on the fine arts and works on teaching through dance, yoga and other movements, painting, and arts and crafts.  They emphasize interactions and social development much more than Montessori and learning is child-centered and based on what the children find interesting or exciting.

 

Montessori on the other hand focuses on individualization and working at the child's pace. There is way less focus on group interactions and I have seen very little social interactions in the form of play.  Montessori students are thought to be "little adults" because they are taught to be extremely responsible and respectful at an early age.  Though I agree that it is important to teach respectful behavior from the beginning, I believe Montessori expects too much from such young children.  Students must be allowed to act their age, learn from their mistakes and interact with their peers to build a strong sense of self, and I do not see that Montessori provides this development in the best way. 

 

Although there are pros and cons to both methods, I believe Reggio has a better teaching style which will promote social and cognitive development more appropriately.

post #18 of 27

You may want to also post this in the Montessori forum.  You may get more responses.

 

What you have said is a TOTAL misconception about Montessori.  My children have always had the opportunity (daily) for group work.  Our Montessori school has a lovely art program (Monart), violin program (taught by a violinist of the local Philharmonic orchestra!), and DD's kindy teacher from last year ran the yoga program (she is accredited/certified in all sorts of different yoga programs).  Crafts?  Oh my goodness....they are constantly doing crafts!  My walls and fridge can vouch for that! ;)

 

Montessori does focus on working at the child's pace, however all the Montessori schools we have been in (3 so far) have many opportunities during the day for social interactions and play!  I don't think the children are expected to be "little adults", but they *ARE* taught to be responsible and respectful. For example, our schools use real forks, glass plates, glass cups, etc. The children serve their own snack when their body tells them they are hungry (they don't wait for a set "snack break" like a lot of schools do) and they are expected to wash their utensils, cups, and plates, dry them, and put them back for the next person who sits down at the snack table. I don't believe it's expecting too much from them.  It's modeling appropriate behavior.  Oh, and the kindy's and 1st graders in both of my DD's classes *DEFINITELY* act their age! LOL!  Because Montessori materials are self correcting, they learn from their own mistakes without having to be told "they are wrong!" (which completely kills their motivation to want to learn!)  Going back to snack time - if a child drops and breaks a glass they learn to be more careful the next time.  There is no "OMG you broke it!" from the teacher, the child just goes and gets the broom and dust pan and cleans it up.  That is learning from experience!  They aren't rewarded with stars and stickers.  I have asked my children on many o          ccassions, "Which makes you feel better?  Getting a sticker for completing a job or getting that good feeling because you accomplished something?"  They have never ONCE chosen the extrinsic reward as their answer!!  They feel proud of their own accomplishments and as a parent I always say things like, "Wow...I bet that makes you feel proud of yourself!" and they say, "It does!"  

 

As for Reggio, I *LOVE* their program and if we had no Montessori programs in our area, I would have sought out a Reggio program definitely.  In fact, there is a local Montessori school here that has a 9-1 Montessori program and then after lunch, recess, and naps they have a Reggio program for the "after school" program.  Win/win!!!

post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by esatchell View Post


Montessori on the other hand focuses on individualization and working at the child's pace. There is way less focus on group interactions and I have seen very little social interactions in the form of play.  Montessori students are thought to be "little adults" because they are taught to be extremely responsible and respectful at an early age.  Though I agree that it is important to teach respectful behavior from the beginning, I believe Montessori expects too much from such young children.  Students must be allowed to act their age, learn from their mistakes and interact with their peers to build a strong sense of self, and I do not see that Montessori provides this development in the best way. 

 

Although there are pros and cons to both methods, I believe Reggio has a better teaching style which will promote social and cognitive development more appropriately.


You probably want to take a look at Lillard's 2006 Science article on socialization and Montessori outcomes, just FYI.

post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by esatchell View Post

I am currently a university student learning about the many different styles of teaching.  I have done a lot of research about the differences between Montessori and Reggio and am a big fan of Reggio's style of teaching.

 

Both schools provide a lot of hands on experience and individulaized learning however Reggio allows for a bit more group work. Reggio has a greater focus on the fine arts and works on teaching through dance, yoga and other movements, painting, and arts and crafts.  They emphasize interactions and social development much more than Montessori and learning is child-centered and based on what the children find interesting or exciting.

 

Montessori on the other hand focuses on individualization and working at the child's pace. There is way less focus on group interactions and I have seen very little social interactions in the form of play.  Montessori students are thought to be "little adults" because they are taught to be extremely responsible and respectful at an early age.  Though I agree that it is important to teach respectful behavior from the beginning, I believe Montessori expects too much from such young children.  Students must be allowed to act their age, learn from their mistakes and interact with their peers to build a strong sense of self, and I do not see that Montessori provides this development in the best way. 

 

Although there are pros and cons to both methods, I believe Reggio has a better teaching style which will promote social and cognitive development more appropriately.

 

You don't by any chance go to the University of Wisconsin, do you?
 

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