or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Women's Health  › Bra Wearers May Face Up to 125-Fold Higher Cancer Risk
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bra Wearers May Face Up to 125-Fold Higher Cancer Risk - Page 2

post #21 of 44
I went through a period of severe underemployment where I was WAH for about a year and a half. I only wear a bra if I leave the house, and I very very rarely left the house during this time, maybe like once or twice a month. (Really not a healthy time for me. ) I noticed ZERO difference in the girls. Gravity, sadly, seems to have far outweighed any added ligament strength.
post #22 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by MayBaby2007 View Post
That is interesting.

I read THIS site awhile ago. I often play around w/the idea of going bra-free...but I don't think I can do that, yk? I'm 38DDD but according to that site, going bra free can help perk up the ladies. I'm not daring enough to venture out and about w/o a bra yet.



Interesting.
but... but... what about all the low-hanging ladies on National Geographic that NEVER wore bras...?
post #23 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Juvysen View Post
but... but... what about all the low-hanging ladies on National Geographic that NEVER wore bras...?
: Good point.

There is an MDC mama who has www.brafree.org in her sig. I can't remember who. Maybe she'll see this thread and shed some light?
post #24 of 44
Interesting but there are so many confounding variables.

Women who do NOT wear bras are a pretty unique group, I'd say, and for example might be:

* "Crunchier" and more likely to be healthy
* ... and eat well
* ... and have breastfed
* ... and exercise
* ... and be a normal weight
* ... and not take medicines
* ... and do things like yoga or meditation
* ... and on and on and on.
post #25 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Juvysen View Post
but... but... what about all the low-hanging ladies on National Geographic that NEVER wore bras...?
I didn't start wearing a bra until well after my breasts developed ... they got much perkier in general after I started wearing one.
post #26 of 44
Quote:
Wow, I didn't realize that people actually wore their bras to bed.
I wear a bra all the time- even to bed. I have big boobs and a smallish frame- not pregnant I am either a 34 or 36 DDD/E. I am very uncomfortable not wearing a bra. My breasts are sooooo heavy it hurts just about everything not to wear one- especially when preggers and nursing. When I sleep without one I loose sleep from the discomfort and it makes it harder to breath for some reason.
post #27 of 44
I am the one with the www.brafree.org link
The front page sums up the views of the doctor who created the page concisely, and she has a long, thorough list of suggestive research with comments here.
She doesn't outright state that breast cancer is caused by bras, but she does believe that they could very well be connected, particularly underwire bras because they cut off the lymph flow around your breasts.
I personally found her page convincing enough to stop wearing a bra altogether about a year and a half ago, and at that time I was a D cup (I have since "deflated" to a large C cup; I think part of the D cup was swelling caused by wearing underwire all the time since I was 14). I found that wearing a camisole under my shirt did wonders for nipple concealment and moderate bounce control without constricting my breasts.
According to DP my breasts also firmed up a few months after I stopped wearing a bra... my guess is that the ligaments had regained their strength. I have noticed a tiny bit more sagging since I stopped wearing a bra, but I really don't know if that's because my breasts haven't been supported or just because I'm a year and a half older now. I wouldn't call them saggy anyway, they're just not quite as plump as they used to be.
I am also curious about the National Geo women who never wear a bra... I think that early, repeated childbearing probably has something to do with it at least. Also, the ligaments in the breast are not connected to the deep muscle layer I believe (?) so they can "slide" down with time. Though breasts sag with childbearing anyway so I don't know if supporting them really helps. I've come to believe that breasts are just not meant to be perky for a woman's entire life cycle and I'm trying not to care too much
Anyway, I hope that helps. I also don't put much stock in the study mentioned in the OP, though I did come across it early in my research about bra wearing. It is suggestive, though as many have pointed out it didn't control for any other factors and correlation does not prove causation.
post #28 of 44
as much as i think women should go off bras more often, i think the study is flawed. It's more a correlation than anything else.

it's kind of like making a survey for people cancer with the question do you like the color red? and a majority said yes, the conclusion would be people who like the color red have X% chance of getting cancer.
post #29 of 44
I dunno, I mean, obviously no one should draw conclusions from a correlative study, BUT, it can direct further study. A correlative one that controls for lifestyle might be somewhat enlightening, but beyond that, what happens when they block the lymph ducts in rats? Have there been studies about that? What about having metal on the rat long term? I dunno, I guess it seems like it could be useful for at least guiding future research.
post #30 of 44
Personally I feel that there is a common sense aspect to not wearing bras as well: breasts were clearly created to move. A lot. All the time. Just think of how much your breasts bounce around (even just a little bit) when you move. If they were supposed to be still, they would be naturally.
Breasts are largely made of fat, which stores toxins. Lymph drains toxins. We are exposed to a large number of environmental toxins every day. If the breasts are constricted by tight bras, they are not able to move and thus help maintain the movement of the lymph (which does not move on its own as blood does) and so the breast fat retains more (cancerous) toxins.
Bras have only been widely worn for about 50 years or so, and during that time breast cancer rates have shot up (as has the level of toxic chemicals in our environment and our food and the rates of sedentary lifestyles, of course). I certainly don't think bra wearing is the only factor, but I think it is very plausible that it has something to do with it. Again, I think brafree.org presents the available evidence and possible conclusions that could be drawn from it thoroughly and unbiasedly.
Though I didn't initially stop wearing a bra for health reasons, but rather for comfort, because I find bras uncomfortable and my breasts are always swollen and unhappy after a day of wearing one. I don't think there is a whole lot of harm in a soft, not-too-tight, non-underwire bra, however, and I will probably wear one when (if) I am pregnant and nursing.
post #31 of 44
I've read this before.

I've noticed among native women, younger girls who have never been pregnant or had a baby have fairly perky breasts. It's mothers who have the typical sagging ones. But if you think about it, sagging may have an advantage since they are pointing down to the baby. I read that on a website somewhere.

As for what to wear if you don't wear bras: I wear an empire waisted tank top under t-shirts most of the time. I am a B-cup.

Edited to add: What I have found very helpful for painful breasts before/during my period is extra vitamin E, about 200-400 IU. It seems to make it go away.
post #32 of 44
Yeah, that's some shady research.

I'm an A-cup and wear a bra all the time. I stick with sport bras at home and at work. I really don't need underwire and I hate the feeling of sweating in an underwire bra. Yuck.

Can't go without a bra. I look "excited" no matter what is going on. I remember in high school I would tape down my nipples with bandaids so I could wear a halter top. Cami's don't conceal nipples either. Actually, a sports bra barely does it so at work it's a sports bra, undershirt then my scrubs top.
post #33 of 44
I just thought about something while in the shower regarding the strong ligament statement. Basically, it's not true.

Tendons and ligaments are the same thing, one connects bone to bone the other, bone to muscle. When you add resistance (i.e. the weight of unsupported breasts over time) to those ligaments they stretch to some degree. Think about it: stretching before exercise, yoga, pilates, all these will make you more limber the longer you do them. When you first start it hurts to attempt to touch your toes but after adding resistance you can stick your head between your knees. So, resistance to tendons and ligaments = longer and stretchier not shorter and stronger.

When a tendon/ligament is not used is when it gets shorter and tighter. I saw this first hand when I used to work long term care and even at my current job. When someone loses function/movement from something like head trauma, vegetative state or the degenerative process of aging they are at high risk for contractures (sp?). The classic example is foot drop. Someone who is bed/chair ridden doesn't walk and doesn't utilize the tendons in the foot. When laying in bed the foot naturally planter flexes causing the Achilles tendon to shorten. If the foot is rarely dorsiflexed the tendon doesn't get the "work out" it needs so it shortens permanently and that person can no longer stand flat footed. The foot has "dropped" permanently.
post #34 of 44
Well, I'm at work and I'm not wearing a bra :

It's so liberating. And comfy.

FTR, I wear a white polo at work and I'm a 38DDD. I wore a spandex-y tank top underneathe to prevent extreme jiggle.

My current bra really hurts--I have what looks like burning under my breasts because of the underwire. I have to get a new one soon....but I can't find my size in a IRL store that's reasonable (I can go to a bra shop and pay $60...but that's just crazy!).

ursusarctos, thanks for hopping in with some info. Your sig is what took me to brafree.org in the first place. It's interesting. Because of that I might not start dd on bras at all when she's older--just a tank under her shirts. We'll see.


Anyway. Just wanted to report that I'm all natural' tonight at work
post #35 of 44
interesting! all i know is something has to be up with wearing a bra! when i get home from work my boobs hurt so bad! all i can think about is getting that darn thing off!
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by not now View Post
I just thought about something while in the shower regarding the strong ligament statement. Basically, it's not true.

Tendons and ligaments are the same thing, one connects bone to bone the other, bone to muscle. When you add resistance (i.e. the weight of unsupported breasts over time) to those ligaments they stretch to some degree. Think about it: stretching before exercise, yoga, pilates, all these will make you more limber the longer you do them. When you first start it hurts to attempt to touch your toes but after adding resistance you can stick your head between your knees. So, resistance to tendons and ligaments = longer and stretchier not shorter and stronger.

When a tendon/ligament is not used is when it gets shorter and tighter. I saw this first hand when I used to work long term care and even at my current job. When someone loses function/movement from something like head trauma, vegetative state or the degenerative process of aging they are at high risk for contractures (sp?). The classic example is foot drop. Someone who is bed/chair ridden doesn't walk and doesn't utilize the tendons in the foot. When laying in bed the foot naturally planter flexes causing the Achilles tendon to shorten. If the foot is rarely dorsiflexed the tendon doesn't get the "work out" it needs so it shortens permanently and that person can no longer stand flat footed. The foot has "dropped" permanently.
Thank you for your comment, not now. It motivated me to check out ligaments more closely.
So as far as I understand, ligaments when stretched can become not only longer but more flexible/elastic? So the ligaments of a breast under normal stress (not running, just day to day bouncing) would not necessarily "stretch out" to a great degree, rather might become more used to stretching and contracting throughout the day? Basically a flexibility thing. Of course, with increased strain on the breasts, like the sudden changes of pregnancy and breastfeeding, or jogging, or extremely large breasts, the ligaments might overstretch and cause pain/sagging.
At least this is what I gather... Correct me if I got the wrong idea. Personally I'd rather have saggy, flexible breasts with healthy ligaments than breasts with stiff, short ligaments.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MayBaby2007 View Post
Because of that I might not start dd on bras at all when she's older--just a tank under her shirts. We'll see.
That is so cool to hear. When I was starting to get breasts my mom forced me to start wearing bras even though I found them terribly uncomfortable. I wish she had thought of the tank solution.
Though who knows, maybe your daughter will want to wear bras because they are a symbol of womanhood and femininity... I certainly went through that stage too once I was old enough to buy lacy, sexy bras

Quote:
Originally Posted by lovebug View Post
interesting! all i know is something has to be up with wearing a bra! when i get home from work my boobs hurt so bad! all i can think about is getting that darn thing off!
That is what motivated me to stop in the first place.

BTW here is another interesting breast website I found: 007 Breasts. I don't think it's as scientifically based as brafree but it looks fascinating anyway. It also deals with social issues and attitudes around breasts and breastfeeding.
post #37 of 44
This study seems flawed to me for sure!
Also, I eat well, do yoga, normal weight, breastfeed, have a BS, exercise and am at least a bit crunchy, lol but I need to wear a bra for comfort, even at night.

I never did until I had my 3rd baby. Then my breasts just got huge and so heavy that it is painful without one!
I wear a very soft nursing bra to bed and a soft bra plus jogger bra to run and do aerobic exercise. Otherwise the weight really is too much.

Deb
post #38 of 44
I wonder why many people are so uncomfortable IN bras and others are so uncomfortable OUT of bras...

I guess i'm middle of the road. Except for social issues, I'm comfortable bra free (except if i have to run, but I just grab and go : - it's only at home, I guess). But when i'm wearing a bra I never have problems with it, really, either. I used to be a 36 A before breastfeeding, and went up to a 36DD and am now down to a 36 b-c (ish? my son is slowing down on the breastfeeding so it's only a couple times a day at this point).

The only time I can remember sleeping with a bra on was at summer camp as a early teen when we were all sure that wearing our bras all night would make our boobs bigger. I just wonder what the difference is between people on this because it seems like a pretty wide variation. Is it just related to breastsize?
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
Hmm, interesting. I wonder what all they controlled for- weight, breasdt size, breastfeeding, other lifestyle factors, etc.

-Angela
I wonder too.... cancer risk cant accurately be measured by just the amount of time one wears a bra. This is also measuring breast cancer diagnoses; many cases aren't diagnosed especially in poorer areas (appalacia, etc).
post #40 of 44
I haven't been able to wear a bra for about 8 years due to a nerve injury (any constriction anywhere along my back, including jeans, underwear, bathing suits, etc. causes painful and sustained back spasms). My boobs shrank with each child to the point of ... nothing. But if I could wear a bra, at least I would look like I had boobs. I wear two tshirts or the time. I can't wear just one layer. And there's a lot of clothes that just don't fit right because they're all cut to fit someone with boobs. So there is a downside. That being said, it's pretty comfortable. And my mother had breast cancer, so I'm always looking for things that "might" cause it, just in case (electric blankets and anti-perspirant have also come under attack at different times). My mother was considered very low risk (had her first child, actually all, before age 30, breastfed us all for a year, even when it wasn't fashionable, ate healthy, exercised, never drank or smoked) so you just never know. Now I can say I'm not wearing a bra for health reasons. Get more people to do it and I won't feel so weird!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Women's Health
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Women's Health  › Bra Wearers May Face Up to 125-Fold Higher Cancer Risk