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Herbal infusion study group- updated with links in OP - Page 2

post #21 of 165
i do the infusions alot. i kinda skipped the last couple of weeks, which hasnt been great for me. back on tomorrow tho. i love infusions. i love herbs in general.
post #22 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoMe View Post
Okay, since you're selling us all on nettles

I have Nutritional Herbology by Mark Pedersen. It has nutrient information for a bunch of herbs. You say one cup of nettles infusion has 500mg calcium, and I feel like I've seen that number before, too. He says 100g dry herb has 2900mg calcium. So how many grams in a cup of dry nettles? Do the numbers work out? Cause that really is a lot of calcium. I'm also curious how oxalates factor in to the equation, and how bioavailable that calcium is.

How do infusions compare to eating the fresh herb and/or juicing?
I'm out of my league again on the calcium amounts, bioavailablity, etc. I can just get anecdotal again on you there, saying I've felt such benefits with sleep that I assume that I'm absorbing some good minerals from the stuff. But the improved sleep could also be related to adrenal support, or some of the other goodies in the brew, like chlorophyll. I really couldn't gander a guess here, just tell you my experience.

Fresh nettle juice, though, is supposed to be pretty miraculous at stopping bleeding, where as the dried stuff is less effective at that. Also, fresh nettle is supposed to be better at fighting allergies than the dried -- some people take capsules of freeze-dried nettle for that reason. Whatever it is that stings in the fresh nettle is said to be particularly effective against histamines. It does sting, though! That's partly why plantain grows close by nettle. Get stung by the nettle, apply the plantain .

Finally, I think the thing that's missing from our conversation thus far is the relationship with the plant, the green world, and the "whole gestalt" idea, that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Many, many herbalists take this approach, and I trust it -- the approach that we are in relationship with these plants, a sacred relationship. I think that's an important part of any herbal healing discussion.
post #23 of 165
I am a huge fan of Susun Weed. Out of all the herbal books on my bookshelf she is the one I reach for first,always. The wisewoman tradition is as old as mother earth herself.
My favorite infusion is nettle/lemon balm. I bring water to just a boil,throw a big handful of each into the quart jar,pour water,put lid on and let sit for 4 hours or more.
I drink a quart a day when my body wants it. It will stay good for about 45-48 hours in the fridge. Sometimes I sweeten with agave,sometimes I don't. I really just listen to what my body wants.
She is on youtube too. If I could have only one herbalist author on my shelves it would be Susun.
post #24 of 165
I'm drinking a nettle/rrl infusion right now. I take at least one cup a day. How ever much my body tells me to take.

Could someone talk to me about lemon thyme. I think that's what I've got growing...I'd love to know more about it.
post #25 of 165
I'm also no "expert" but I have been drinking infusions for 13 years and took a correspondence class with Susun Weed and my mother studied with her before I did. I would highly recommend to any and all of you to take a correspondence class with her, I forget the cost, but it's a fabulous way to learn.

The reason you take infusions is for the minerals. Plant cells walls are tough. You cannot open them up fresh through chewing or juicing. That's why you use dried plant material for infusions. The cell wall breaks down, and makes minerals available for you.
Minerals do not get destroyed through heat. The way scientists test for minerals is to burn whatever they are testing to ash and test the ash. Some vitamins get diminished through heat, but you're not taking infusions for vitamins.

Susun talks about minerals like rocks, because, they are rocks. All our rocks are made out of minerals. If you want a large amount of minerals, will the size of a pill or tincture dropper give you a lot? How do you compress rocks? You don't. You need bulk and you need time. If you put a rock in a glass of water will it dissolve quickly? No. It will dissolve, but over time. Add heat, and it happens faster. Break down the cell walls, to allow escape, and add hot water and let it do its thing. I'm not saying that tinctures are bad, they just don't give you large amounts of minerals.

She recommends one ounce by weight of dried herb to 1 quart of boiling water. If you used bought cut and sifted herb, that's usually and handful or two. Put it into a one quart canning jar, fill to top with boiling water, cap it and let it stand. Strain, giving your leftover herb to the earth somehow. Then reheat or drink room temp or ice. Refrigerate what you don't use. It might feel like complicated at first, but once you get started it's really quite fun and exciting and easy to do.

Eating raw or juiced weeds or anything gets you vitamins, enzymes, fiber, and a lovely texture. If you have an abundance of fresh weeds and want them now, the cook them. Cook them thoroughly, for about 45 minutes to an hour. You want significant texture change to know that the minerals are now in your broth. Eat the greens and drink the broth.

My top 9 are:
Nettles
Oatstraw
red raspberry leaf
red clover blossom
skullcap
comfrey leaf
dandelion root
dandelion leaf
violet leaf

I couldn't think of 10. That's pretty much what I have used for the last 13 years. I buy some, and forage some.

Susun highly believes in simples, for many reasons. But you could add a pinch of mint to any of them for flavor or horsetail for mouth care.
Simples help you to notice the changes in your body. They help you to listen to what you body is craving. They are good for simplifying your life somewhere!

I highly recommend getting Susun's book Healing Wise. It's the green book and easy and fun to read and follow. It's a superb book for explanations and a new way of thinking. I have reread it dozens of times. All her books are wonderful and helpful, but I would start with Healing Wise.

Infusions changed my life. They are highly supportive. Energy giving. Satisfying. I drink less water when I drink them. I pretty much only drink water, infusion, raw milk and kefir. I drink the occasional cup of herbal tea for fun, but not for minerals.

I drink them usually room temp. RRL and Red Clover tasted so much like tea that I make them and ice them like iced tea over the summer with stevia if I want sweetness.

You will figure out how you like them. With salt or sweetener. Cold or hot.
Weeds are good at getting out of the earth what we need. That's what makes them good weeds. :
post #26 of 165
I loved my nettle infusions but right now I am nursing a 3 month year old and I am having a hard time with oversupply. Does anyone know of any infusions that won't increase my suppy?
post #27 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by moonlight mom View Post
I loved my nettle infusions but right now I am nursing a 3 month year old and I am having a hard time with oversupply. Does anyone know of any infusions that won't increase my suppy?
Red Raspberry Leaf infusion, while great for nursing in small amounts, may decrease milk amounts in some women when drunk often or in large amounts.

Rosewater, what a great post that was! Very clarifying. Thank you so much.
post #28 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbravebird View Post
Rosewater, what a great post that was! Very clarifying. Thank you so much.
You're welcome. It's my passion....can you tell?
post #29 of 165


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post #30 of 165
Thread Starter 
Could I toss the used strained herbs into the freezer to use making my bone broths later? (I simmer the broth for 48 hours, usually).


Pat
post #31 of 165
I'm loving infusions lately too. My latest favorite is Chamomile. It was very soothing a few weeks ago when my stomach was giving me trouble. It really helped.

My other usuals are chickweed, Nettles, RRL, Red clover, and sometimes I add a few pinches of some sort of mint or stevia.
post #32 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by WuWei View Post
Could I toss the used strained herbs into the freezer to use making my bone broths later? (I simmer the broth for 48 hours, usually).
Pat
I don't see why not, except that most of the good stuff will be out after the overnight infusing. I usually make mine overnight, so it sits for 8-12 hours, depending. But give it a try and see if it helps!

Quote:
Originally Posted by TopazBlueMama View Post
I'm loving infusions lately too. My latest favorite is Chamomile. It was very soothing a few weeks ago when my stomach was giving me trouble. It really helped.

My other usuals are chickweed, Nettles, RRL, Red clover, and sometimes I add a few pinches of some sort of mint or stevia.
Do you add stevia when you are letting your infusion sit for overnight? I tried that once with rrl, and it was awfully bitter and nasty tasting. I ended up doing rrl by itself and then making a quick stevia tea, steeping it for 5 minutes, then straining and pouring it into my rrl until it tasted good. I'm just curious if it's just me who can't stand stevia steeped overnight.
post #33 of 165
I wanted to add 2 more things to my post.
First, I usually let all my infusion sit overnight, which is anywhere between 8 and 12 hours.

And I also have started adding sea veggies to my infusions. I cannot stand the taste of plain kelp or other sea veggie infusion. It makes me gag. So I have started making my simples a double, by combining half whatever and half sea veggie. (Some kind of kelp usually). Or I add kelp to any infusion as a large pinch. Kelp has great iodine as well as minerals in it. (Having just noticed the iodine thread, it reminded me!)
post #34 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosewater View Post

And I also have started adding sea veggies to my infusions. I cannot stand the taste of plain kelp or other sea veggie infusion.
Ladies, thanks for all the information. I'm learning a ton! Love the Top 10 lists!!

Rosewater, consider adding the kelp to a small amount of tomato juice, stir and drink it down quickly. The additional benefits of the kelp are that they absorb/bind with heavy metals in the gut. So, it is preferred to consume the whole food. It really is mildly salty and not yucky in tomato juice (thanks JR for the idea!!). If the liquid sets the kelp absorbs moisture and it becomes "sludge" (per dh). But, it is just salty tomato juice when the kelp is added quickly.


Pat
post #35 of 165
I'll take notice of if stevia tastes bitter overnight. I don't recall right now if I've done overnight brews with stevia in it.
I planted fresh stevia, chamomile, yerba buena and apple mint for teas in my garden this year..yay!
Also, my sister has raspberries planted in her yard. Can you literally get the leaves from a regular rasperry plant and dry for tea?
post #36 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosewater View Post
Do you add stevia when you are letting your infusion sit for overnight? I tried that once with rrl, and it was awfully bitter and nasty tasting. I ended up doing rrl by itself and then making a quick stevia tea, steeping it for 5 minutes, then straining and pouring it into my rrl until it tasted good. I'm just curious if it's just me who can't stand stevia steeped overnight.
I don't know about stevia, but I can't stand how bitter RRL gets when steeped overnight. I can only handle about a four-hour infusion for that one, and then I have to sort of choke it down, it's so bitter to me. I'm not in the habit of sweetening or minting my infusions, because I'm usually fine with just the taste, but RRL gets to me.
post #37 of 165
Pat, you start all the coolest threads! Subbing because I've recently decided to add herbal infusions in, I just need to learn more.
post #38 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by TopazBlueMama View Post
Can you literally get the leaves from a regular rasperry plant and dry for tea?
Yes and no. Wild raspberry leaves are far more medicinal, and have loads more nutrients in them. But yes, you can get some benefits from cultivated kinds.

I'd like to reply more, but dd needs me.
post #39 of 165
Oh that makes sense. I didn't think about wild raspberries.
post #40 of 165
I never ever use boiling water on herbs. It will destroy the vitamins though most minerals will remain intact. I like to tell people that water can be around 115 degrees. Roots have different infusion times than leaves which have different times than blossoms.

Sun and moon infusions are great ways to extract the most nutrients possible. again what you can also do is follow the rule that water should be hot to the touch, but tolerable.

Top ten herbs in my cabinet (that will vary based on your status (breastfeeding, pregnant etc.)
nettles
RRL
chickweed
blessed thistle
alfalfa
lemon balm (sweet melissa)
yellow dock
red clover
oatstraw
rose hips/hibiscus

I love to use herbs, but I really only use them nutritionally. I am not a big fan of using them medicinally.
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