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Herbal infusion study group- updated with links in OP - Page 4

post #61 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Panserbjørne View Post
well, that and my woo woo self would say that when you want invigoration you use the energy of the sun. When you want calming you use the energy of the moon.
I'm trying to work out the logistics of how you would put this into practice.
Because by the time the 'invigorating' tea from the sun is ready, it would be the end of day, and the 'calming' one from the sun would be ready in the morning, right? I'd want to drink them at opposite times!
post #62 of 165
nah, I wake up and prepare the infusions first thing. We put them out on the patio by around 7. Then they are fine to drink by noon. Also, you can strain and refrigerate them! They are divine iced!
post #63 of 165
I am so glad this discussion is happening.
For a couple of months I was doing Infusions and loving it.
I then introduced alfalfa and eventually recognized the intense MSG headaches I was experiencing was because of the glutamates in alfalfa. I went back my regular nettles and other herbs mix and found I was getting headaches from the sulfur in nettles. I've been heartbroken. My pendulum has frequently said no to my herbs. I've decided to try again, but slowly, using red clover blossoms as a simple. I really hope this works. I missed my teas.
post #64 of 165
Thread Starter 
Been hectic here today. I'll post more tomorrow!


Pat
post #65 of 165
I can't believe that I have only seem this thread now. I love herbs and I can't get enough of them.

I recently went to a class with Rosemary Gladstar and it was so inspiring. She talked alot about making herbs a more daily part of our lives.

I will share one of the hebs she taught about:
Astragalus:
"It restores the deepest part of the immune system and goes to where your immune cells are birthed. It restores bone marrow. It is good to use for those with compromised immune systems and safe to use during chemo.

Astragalus is the ginseng for younger folks."

I have been using the root chunks in soups and broths, and sprinkling the powder in everything else.

I was sick over the weekend and it went away so fast after a big helping of astragalus and dandelion bone broth soup. I did add loads of dulse and nettles to the soup too.
post #66 of 165
I am very interested in hearing about the infusion made in the sun and moon. I wonder if it would extract the vitamins and not enough minerals. I am trying to get both. Do I have to warm the water up to a particular temp first?

And in VT where I am it is still so cold and very overcast on most days. What do I do then and what about in the winter when it is -20 out? No sun infusions then.

I am only familiar with boiling water over the herbs. I would love to learn more.
post #67 of 165
I've been following this thread and like the pp feel an affinity with astragalus. Often in October I make a soup for us to drink over the next few months with astragalus, shitakes and other good things in it.

As to infusions, oatstraw and nettles are my current choices. I'm enjoying all the wisdom being shared here. Is anyone using chinese or tibetan herbs?
post #68 of 165
Thread Starter 
Life has been hectic. Yesterday, ds turned 8! We have company today. I'll update these infusions asap. But, please, feel free to start threads about your favorite infusion, or about one you'd like to explore. I'll link it in the OP.

Also, I was just reading that dandelion tea should be avoided with mercury issues. http://books.google.com/books?id=ZG9...um=5#PPA158,M1


Pat
post #69 of 165
I'm excited that this topic is being discussed. I don't have alot of spare time these days- but I'll find the time to read along with you all!

Lisa
post #70 of 165
Thread Starter 
Herbs to avoid during pregnancy
It should be remembered that pregnancy is a normal state, and apart from the nutritive plants mentioned above, does not require herbal medicines unless specifically indicated. However, sometimes a woman may suffer from severe morning sickness or influenza. Ginger root (Zingiber officinale), at one gram per day, has been shown in several small studies to be advantageous in the treatment of nausea and vomiting during pregnancy.1,2 Ginger root can be taken fresh as an infused tea or used dry in tea bags and should not exceed 2 grams per day. Echinacea is another herb that is used to assist recovery from influenza. In a study that followed 206 women who had used echinacea products during pregnancy (112 of whom had taken it during the first trimester) and compared pregnancy outcomes with a control group, it was found that use of echinacea during the time of organ development was not associated with an increased risk of major malformation.3



The following herbs should not be used to self-medicate, however at times they maybe prescribed by a registered medical herbalist in order to treat specific conditions in the short term. This list may not be complete, therefore before using any herbal products during pregnancy or breastfeeding, check with the company that produced the product, or otherwise a registered medical herbalist. For a list of registered medical herbalists in your region see www.nzamh.org.nz/map
Known poisons in pregnancy
  • Aconite (Aconitum napellus)
  • American mandrake (Podophyllum)
  • Bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara)
  • Blood root (Sanguinaria canadensis)
  • Boldo (Peumus boldo)
  • Bryony (Bryonia alba)
  • Coltsfoot (Tussilago farafara)
  • Comfrey (Symphytum officinale)
  • Datura (Datura stramonium)
  • Ephedra sinica (Ephedra)
  • Greater celandine (Chelidonium majus)
  • Grounsel (Senecio vulgaris)
  • Horsechestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) – in high doses
  • Life root (Senecio aureus)
  • Poke root (Phytolacca americana)
  • Sassafras (Sassafra officinale)
  • Tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum)
  • Wild cherry bark ( Prunus serotina)
Uterine stimulants or emmenagogues (Some of these are used in very late pregnancy but should only be taken if prescribed by a registered herbal practitioner or midwife)
  • Angelica (Angelica archangelica) – not to be taken in high doses
  • Birthwort (Aristolochia serpentaria)
  • Black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa)
  • Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides)
  • Dong quai (Angelica polymorpha)- not to be taken during 1st trimester or where there is a tendency to miscarriage
  • Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium)
  • Mugwort
  • Pasque flower (Anenome pulsatilla)
  • Pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium)
  • Rue (Ruta graveolens)
  • Southernwood
  • Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)
  • Thuja (Thuja occidentalis)
  • Wormwood
Berberine containing herbs
  • Barberry (Berberis vulgaris)
  • Golden seal (Hydrastis Canadensis)
  • Oregon mountain grape (Berberis aquifolium)
Pure essential oils should never be taken internally. Essential oils are highly concentrated and should only be used in low quantities for flavouring, for example peppermint, aniseed or orange, or in a diluted form for external applications.
Avoid use of the following essential oils during pregnancy:
  • Aniseed (Pimpinella anisum)
  • Arnica (Arnica Montana)
  • Basil (Ocymum basilicum)
  • Birch (Betula alba)
  • Bitter almond (Prunus amygdalis var: amara)
  • Boldo leaf (Peumus boldus)
  • Calamus (Acorus calamus-acorus)
  • Camphor (Cinnamomum camphora)
  • Cassia (Cinnamomum cassia)
  • Cedarwood (Juniperus virginiana)
  • Cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum)
  • Clary sage (Salvia sclarea)
  • Clove (Eugenia caryophyllata)
  • Cypress (Cupressus sempervirens)Not during first 4 months
  • Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)
  • Horseradish (Cochlearia armoricia)
  • Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis)
  • Jasmine (Jasminum officinale)
  • Juniper (Juniperus communis)
  • Marjoram (Origanum majorana)
  • Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) sometimes called Armoise
  • Mustard (Brassica nigra)
  • Origanum (Origanum vulgare, [Spanish] Thymus capitatus)
  • Parsley seed (Petroselinum sativum)
  • Pennyroyal (Mentha pulgium, Hedeoma pulgioides)
  • Peppermint (Mentha piperita)
  • Pine [dwarf] (Pinus pumilio)
  • Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)
  • Rue (Ruta graveolens)
  • Sage (Salvia officinalis)
  • Sassafras (Sassafras albidum, Ocotea cymbarum)
  • Savin (Juniperus sabina)
  • Savory (Satureia hortensis, Satureia montana)
  • Southernwood (Artemisia abrotanum)
  • Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)
  • Thuja [Cedar leaf] (Thuja occidentalis)
  • Thuja plicata
  • Thyme (Thymus vulgaris)
  • Wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens)
  • Wormseed (Chenopodium anthelminticum)
  • Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium)

Laxative herbs have been traditionally avoided during pregnancy because of possible uterine stimulation in some individuals
  • Aloes resin (Aloe barbadensis)
  • Buckthorn (Rhamnus catharticus)
  • Cascara sagrada (Rhamnus purshiana)
  • Culvers root or blackroot (Veronicastrum virginica)
  • Rhubarb (Rheum officinale)
Phytoestrogen (plant oestrogens) containing herbs should not be used in excess until further research is carried out
  • Soy products
  • Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum)
  • Alfalfa (Medicago sativa)
  • Red clover (Trifolium pratense)
  • Pumpkin seed oil (Curcubita maxima)
Hormone-like activity
  • Wild yam (Dioscorea villosa)
Others
  • Adhatoda vasica
  • Andrographis paniculata
  • Broom (Sarothamnus scoparius)
  • Bugleweed (Lycopus virginicus)
  • Cinnamon (Cinnamomum species) – except in low doses as a spice
  • Corydalis ambigua
  • Embelia ribus
  • Mistletoe (Viscum album)
  • Nutmeg (Myristica fragans) – except in low doses as a spice
  • Panax notoginseng
  • Periwinkle species (Vinca species)
  • Saffron (Crocus sativus) – except in low doses as a spice
  • Sage (Salvia officinalis)
  • Salvia miltiorrhiza
  • Squill (Urginea species)
  • Tribulus terrestris
  • Tylophora indica
  • Uva ursi (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi)
  • Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)- high doses
St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum) is a useful herbal treatment for mild to moderate depression, and no increase in frequency of malformation or other harmful side effects on the foetus have been observed, based on its limited use in pregnant women. However evidence of foetal damage in animal studies does exist4. Therefore, we at present do not recommend products containing St. John's wort during pregnancy, and only recommend the use of St. John's wort postnatally, where there are clear indications for its use e.g. postnatal depression (along with B Complex and zinc). Licorice extract (Glycyrrhiza glabra) can be used in small amounts only, as long as there is no high blood pressure. Licorice extract intake, even as a confectionary, should not exceed three gram per day, as it may cause increased sodium retention.



This whole site looks amazingly informative!!
http://www.nourish.net.nz/articles-c...ac=311&art=566




Pat
post #71 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Phytoestrogenic food-like herbs are generally considered longevity tonics. For optimum effect, use only one from the list below and to stick with it for at least three months. Citrus peel, dandelion leaves and/or roots, fenugreek seeds, flax seeds, green tea, hops, red clover, red wine.


Phytoestrogenic herbs are usually too powerful for long-term use. From the list below (which is in alphabetical order), it is safest to use only one herb at a time, and use it only when needed, although that may mean daily use for several months. More information about these herbs, including specific dosages and cautions, is in New Menopausal Years the Wise Woman Way.


Agave root, black cohosh root, black currant, black haw, chasteberries, cramp bark, dong quai root, devil's club root, false unicorn root, ginseng root, groundsel herb, licorice, liferoot herb, motherwort herb, peony root, raspberry leaves, rose family plants (most parts), sage leaves, sarsaparilla root, saw palmetto berried, wild yam root, yarrow blossoms.
http://www.susunweed.com/herbal_ezin...ter_Feb-02.htm




Pat
post #72 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Can I make enough infusion to last for a whole week?
No. It is best to make infusion fresh each day. Once made, nourishing herbal infusions spoil rapidly. Refrigeration lengthens the time the infusion is good to drink. Depending on many factors, including the herb used and the indoor temperature during the brewing, refrigerated infusion is usually good for at least 24 hours, sometimes as much as 72 hours.
How can you tell if your infusion has spoiled?
If a nourishing herbal infusion tastes funny, smells odd, and/or has bubbles in it, it is no longer fit to drink.
http://www.botanical.com/site/column...infusions.html




Pat
post #73 of 165
Thread Starter 

Just Say No to Synthetic Vitamins and Processed Foods! Look to nourishing herbs for vitamins and minerals.

[I hit paydirt with this article from Mountain Rose Herbs!! : ]
~VITAMINS~


VITAMIN A
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, borage leaves, burdock root, cayenne, chickweed, eyebright, fennel seed, hops, horsetail, kelp, lemongrass, mullein, nettle, oat straw, paprika, parsley, peppermint, plantain, raspberry leaves, red clover, rose hips, sage, uva ursi, violet leaves, watercress, yellow dock.

VITAMIN B1 (Thiamine)
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, bladder wrack, burdock root, catnip, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, eyebright, fennel seed, fenugreek, hops, nettle, oat straw, parsley, peppermint, raspberry leaves, red clover, rose hips, sage, yarrow, and yellow dock.

VITAMIN B2 (Riboflavin)
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, bladder wrack, burdock root, catnip, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, eyebright, fennel seed, fenugreek, ginseng, hops, horsetail, mullein, nettle, oat straw, parsley, peppermint, raspberry leaves, red clover, rose hips, sage, yellow dock.

VITAMIN B3(Niacin)
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, burdock root, catnip, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, eyebright, fennel seed, hops, licorice, mullein, nettle, oat straw, parsley, peppermint, raspberry leaf, red clover, rose hips, slippery elm, yellow dock.

VITAMIN B5 (Panothenic Acid)
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, burdock root, nettle, yellow dock.

VITAMIN B6 (Pyridoxine)
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, catnip, oat straw.

VITAMIN B12 (cyanocobalamin)
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, bladder wrack, hops.

VITAMIN C (ascorbic acid)
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, burdock root, cayenne, chickweed, eyebright, fennel seed, fenugreek, hops, horsetail, kelp, peppermint, mullein, nettle, oat straw, paprika, parsley, pine needle, plantain, raspberry leaf, red clover, rose hips, skullcap, violet leaves, yarrow, yellow dock.

VITAMIN D
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, horsetail, nettle, parsley.

VITAMIN E
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, bladder wrack, dandelion, dong quai, flaxseed, nettle, oat straw, raspberry leaf, rose hips.

VITAMIN K
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, green tea, kelp, nettle, oat straw, shepherds purse.


~MINERALS~

CALCIUM
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, burdock root, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, chicory, dandelion, eyebright, fennel seed, fenugreek, flaxseed, hops, horsetail, kelp, lemongrass, mullein, nettle, oat straw, paprika, parsley, peppermint, plantain, raspberry leaf, red clover, rose hips, shepherd's purse, violet leaves, yarrow, yellow dock.

CHROMIUM
HERBAL SOURCES: Catnip, horsetail, licorice, nettle, oat straw, red clover, sarsaparilla, wild yam, yarrow.

COPPER
HERBAL SOURCES: Sheep sorrel.

GERMANIUM
HERBAL SOURCES: Aloe vera, comfrey, ginseng, suma.

IODINE
HERBAL SOURCES: Calendula, tarragon leaves, turkey rhubarb.

IRON
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, burdock root, catnip, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, chicory, dandelion, dong quai, eyebright, fennel seed, fenugreek, horsetail, kelp, lemongrass, licorice, milk thistle seed, mullein, nettle, oatstraw, paprika, parsley, peppermint, plantain, raspberry leaf, rose hips, sarsaparilla, shepherd's purse, uva ursi, yellow dock.

MAGNESIUM
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, bladder wrack, catnip, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, dandelion, eyebright, fennel, fenugreek, hops, horsetail, lemongrass, licorice, mullein, nettle, oat straw, paprika, parsley, peppermint, raspberry leaf, red clover, sage, shepherd's purse, yarrow, yellow dock.

MANGANESE
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, burdock root, catnip, chamomile, chickweed, dandelion, eyebright, fennel seed, fenugreek, ginseng, hops, horsetail, lemongrass, mullein, parsley, peppermint, raspberry leaf, red clover, rose hip, wild yam, yarrow, yellow dock.

MOLYBDENUM
HERBAL SOURCES: Red clover blossoms.

PHOSPHOROUS
HERBAL SOURCES: Burdock root, turkey rhubarb, slippery elm bark.

POTASSIUM
HERBAL SOURCES: Catnip, hops, horsetail, nettle, plantain, red clover, sage, skullcap.

SELENIUM
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, burdock root, catnip, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, fennel seed, ginseng, garlic, hawthorn berry, hops, horsetail, lemongrass, milk thistle nettle, oat straw, parsley, peppermint, raspberry leaf, rose hips, sarsaparilla, uva ursi, yarrow, yellow dock.

SULFUR
HERBAL SOURCES: Horsetail.

VANADIUM
HERBAL SOURCES: Dill.

ZINC
HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, burdock root, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, dandelion, eyebright, fennel seed, hops, milk thistle, mullein, nettle, parsley, rose hips, sage, sarsaparilla, skullcap, wild yam.

http://www.mountainroseherbs.com/new.../vitamins.html


Pat
post #74 of 165
Thread Starter 
My computer just crashed and lost 30 minutes of research about Chickweed when it closed my window. Think I'll go have a glass of fermented crushed purple grape juice.

Pat
post #75 of 165
bump!
I'm about to order a few herbs: oatstraw

hmmm I'm not sure what else. I have:
nettle (which I can't have)
hibiscus (yumm)
alfalfa (which I can't have)
dandelion leaf
red clover blossom
raspberry leaves
rose hips
lemon balm (which is not very lemony -is it old?)
milk thistle seed

any other suggestions? I would like to order one more.
post #76 of 165
Comfrey leaf?
post #77 of 165
Is anybody clear on the oat straw / gluten issue? Or rather, not actual gluten, but gluten-like proteins? Any of those in the dried herb that get into an infusion?
post #78 of 165
Hey, you're adding threads without telling us about them!
(can I put in a request for rose hips and/or hibiscus next? )

Anyone know anything about sfherbs.com? I went to their retail store, and everything seems cheap, so I totally stocked up. It was fun

I'll just say that nettles infusions are delicious, and that my rose hips plus hibiscus is great served with a sprig of fresh mint. I'm totally getting addicted to the infusions. I can't wait till I have a bunch in the sun on the balcony and I can take a picture. So pretty!

And is there a fun way to strain these things besides just pouring through a metal strainer? That keeps splashing if I don't do it just right...
post #79 of 165
I infuse in a quart sized glass mason jar with a wide mouth. When it's time to strain I screw on a sprouting lid and just pour the liquid out. The herbs stay in and I dump them in the compost. Easiest way I've found!
post #80 of 165
That does sound much easier! Do you squeeze the liquid out of the herbs when you're done? It seems like it'd be extra nutritious?
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