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Parents who CHOOSE not to eat/feed their family organic - Page 8

post #141 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just My Opinion View Post
Unless organic foods are packaged by kittens and shipped in magical planes that run on love.

post #142 of 183
I haven't read all the posts, but just wanted to say that I think few people can argue the benefits of the "spirit" of organic food. Food produced without pesticides, GMO crops, chemical preservatives, etc. I think the objection comes in the "marketing" of organic food. High cost processed food, or food brought from long distances, upper end supermarkets, etc. For myself and my family (single income) we work in the spirit of organics which means I buy organic flour (not certified) from a local farmer in 50lb bags. I buy grass fed chickens (organic grass, not certified etc.) for things I can't buy locally
(like sugar) I buy organic, and try to limit my consumption of it. I do this not because these things are organic, but because I want to leave a smaller footprint on the earth, I want farmers all over the world to be paid fairly for the food they produce, and I want my families exposure to pesticides, GMO's limited.

Having said that I get frustrated with companies that market organic food aggressively and promote health benefits that may be better than non-organic industrialized produced food, but not by much, and not better than a diet of carefully sourced whole foods. And who charge and incredibly high price for that purpose.:
post #143 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by riverscout View Post
I think I should get the uber-crunchy award for trusting my local farmer's word over the word of "the man" (aka the USDA).
post #144 of 183
I haven't read a whole lot of the responses but for us it's a combo of convenience and affordability. We buy our fruits and veggies at the local market and attempt to feed the kids healthy food from the grocery store.
post #145 of 183
We buy/prepare organic when possible, but being a 2-working parent family (not by choice) sometimes this is pretty difficult. Convienience almost always trumps organic in our house.

We do use http://www.doortodoororganics.com/ though. Its great! Local, organic food delivered right to my door! We also have milk/dairy delivered. This augments are Kraft 'Mac E Cheese' quite nicely!
post #146 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by KSLaura View Post
We do use http://www.doortodoororganics.com/ though. Its great! Local, organic food delivered right to my door!
Thank you! I've signed up for a similar program in my area. (I hope they'll deliver here, my neighborhood is very much lower income.)
post #147 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by frontierpsych View Post
a lot of people are convinced that their kids just won't like healthy food so why bother trying? It's not an attitude I get, honestly.

I don't think too many people think that way- well, I'm sure lots do actually but I doubt it would be a "no organic" argument. It might be a "no healthy food" one.
There are lots of things that lots of people make and feed their kids that is healthy to most people and not organic. How about most of the produce at the grocery store? Most of the meat? Most of the pasta. Most of the... everything. There's more stuff available that isn't organic besides ding dongs and twizzlers.
post #148 of 183
I am a parent who chooses not to eat her family, even though they are locally and organically grown. (Look at the subject)

Mostly, I agree with everything Tigerchild said. Local is what I pull my soapbox out for, so the packaged crackers would already be a "problem" for me, and I would be bringing my own homemade, local, organic snack with enough to share if it helped ease the way.
post #149 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by sisteeesmama View Post
I guess I am an organic snob. To me it's pretty sad that if you buy organic mindfully and talk about organics in a good way you are labeled an elitist or a snob.
I like the idea of local, in fact can't wait for my CSA to start in the next two weeks and the farmers mkt next week......but I will be talking to the farmers about what's organic there, too. I don't just blindly buy whatever they have there and if it tastes great but is not organic I will buy it but talk to the farmers about trying organic.

We do grow our own and our garden is looking great, but if I am at the store I am looking for organic produce AND local produce and the things that haven't traveled very far, our WF labels where things are from.

I don't buy meat unless I know where it is from out of respect for the humane treatment of animals and I like to know what they are being fed as well.


I don't feel snobby about it, I feel great about it, I know I am doing the best things I can for my fam and for animals and for the environment. It's not the easy route and I do shop lots of places and even <GASP> spend more sometimes, but to me it is worth it.
Just so you know, lots of farmers at farmer's markets won't have the organic label purely because it costs them too much to have their farm certified, even if they do farm organically. Or they'll do something like DelicateFlower described and now can't label organic, even though it's pesticide-free and more trustworthy than "organics" shipped from China.

Also, Whole Foods once upon a time used the local organic suppliers listed on their walls. But they oftentimes don't anymore, because they've moved to a central buying system for the entire set of stores across the country instead. Don't take it for granted that the farm on the wall is actually where the stuff you're buying is from. Just FYI.
post #150 of 183
I havent read the whole thread, but to reply to the op, I do not feed my family only organic food and we can afford it. Our family eats "clean" (there is a book about it, basically good quality fruits, veggies, and lean meats) and I just buy whatever looks the best for the cheapest. If it turns out to be organic, great, if not, I don't really care. One reason though that someone may choose not to have ANY organic food is because they just prefer to spend that extra money (not that it is really that much) on something else.
post #151 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChinaDoll View Post
Umm, it's REALLY expensive compared to non-organic?

And not readily available to folks in many American small towns.
I think this is also important to note. There is a tendancy amongst many people at MDC to assume that everyone lives in a large city with many shopping options. For those who live in rural areas, there isn't as big of a selection. I live in the country. There are probably 8-10 grocery stores in a 20 mile radius of my home, and NONE of them carry organic food. It's not a matter of organics being more expensive, or there being a limited selection. The stores simply don't carry any organics. If I want to buy organic food of any sort, I need to drive to a bigger store in a further away city. Travelling 60 miles roundtrip a couple times/week to buy organic produce is not what I would call "crunchy."

OTOH, in my area, I think every small town has a meat market that sells locally-grown meat. The animals come from 'smaller' farming operations that are more likely to pasture their animals. Larger or factory farms are more likely to sell their animals to large meatpacking companies. There are also a multitude of farm stands and the like. I think it is far more ecologically sound for me to buy sweet corn from the back of a local farmer's truck than it is for me to drive 50 miles to the nearest natural foods store in order to get organic sweet corn that was shipper from who knows where.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Delicateflower View Post
I don't eat organic or feed my family organic. It is a very calculated decision.

I amd all about sustainable living, and organic is, to be honest a buzzword that doesn't mean anything about how environmentally sound the growing practices were.

Take herbicides, for example. A single pass with glyphosate to knock down weeds and give your crop a head start in a no-till regime is better than five passes of tilling (especially with a tractor). And yet the high tillage regime that trashes the soil and the local waterways gets the organic label while the no-till does not.

And what is desirable about factory farmed cows being fed organic soybeans to be sold as organic meat and beef, compared to cows living normal lives, supplemented in the winter with (gasp) non-organic feed?
I agree with much of what you said here. I do have concerns about Roundup, but when I weigh those concerns against the very real need for tilling organic fields and the erosion that results, it's hard to know what the *right* answer is.

I do understand why people get so involved in the organic debate, because sustainable farming practices affect everyone the same way factory emissions affect everyone. Of course, in a perfect world, it would be easy for farmers to farm in a sustainable way. But it's not a perfect world, so each of us has to make the best decisions we can given our individual circumstances.
post #152 of 183
It amazes me that people can get so bent out of shape over whether or not there are little green stickers on the food that goes on their table.

Do we all know it's best to avoid excessive chemicals on our foods, but even food you grow yourself in the backyard garden isn't 'organic'.

Local foods are great, and totally workable year round if you freeze or can, most small producers do limit the chemicals they use (if they use any at all) and you can get a lot of information by talking to folks at your local farmer's market about what approaches they use. We do have a producer locally who uses every chemical under the sun, and we have another who is loathe to even weed the garden because they want to do everything with as little impact as possible.

If eating 'organic' foods is important to you and to your family, that's wonderful, more power to you! But it isn't necessarily the only correct way to live. That's the great thing about being an adult- we get to choose what works for us, and what works for our family.

Both the person putting together a great organic meal and taking the time to do that, and the person tossing some mac and cheese and a sliced cucumber on the table after a long day at work deserve our support as mothers. Why choose to let what someone else is eating be an issue?
post #153 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by riverscout View Post
I think I should get the uber-crunchy award for trusting my local farmer's word over the word of "the man" (aka the USDA).
I think I should get the uber crunchy award for having most of these "organic" foods growing in my backyard.

Oh wait, I forgot... I'm totally "un-crunchy", you know, if you judge me based on my opinions on this thread.
post #154 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunny*pa*mom View Post
Well, non-sustainable agriculture methods do affect all of us - our air quality, our watersheds, soil erosion, the ability of wildlife to survive.
Thank you for saying this! We all share the planet and in that respect I think that what your neighbor eats is important. I'm not saying go over shake your finger and condemn them. I would approach it as I approach not vaccinating - sharing information in a caring way and backing off when it is asked.

I've never had anyone refer to my non-vaxing as snobby here on MDC or the fact that I use disposable diapers and un-crunchy, I wonder why food brings up this division?
post #155 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just My Opinion View Post
Local is far better for the environment than "organic" (who's standards are both lax and largely unregulated).
Do you mean to say that something with an "organic" label from the USDA is not better for the environment than local?

Because truly organically grown (whether they pay for the certification or not) is indisputably better for the environment.

I don't think any of us should be labelling each other. However, MDC is about correcting myths that exist in the mainstream (right?) and there are several misconceptions about the environmental and health costs of industrial agriculture. That's all I wanted to contribute.

All mamas who weigh these issues deserve kudos because for each one of us isn't there 30+ other mamas who never considered not vaxing, not circing, cloth diapering, babywearing, extended bfing, cosleeping...etc?
post #156 of 183
I haven't read the whole thread, but I used to do almost all organic, but it just got too expensive. I now do locally grown. It is nice to meet the people who grow my food and to know that it is much fresher then something that has been transported half-way across the country.
post #157 of 183
When one feels so strongly about an important issue it is sometimes hard to understand different choices. But it is simply a matter of priorities, preferences, and palettes.

For me, my food shopping habits are one of the last things I am willing to budge on. I find other ways to tighten our spending. I fully recognize that even though we don't have a lot, I still come from a place of privilege to be able to make these choices.

Other people need to spend their money in other places, or it is simply not a hot-button issue for them. That's just how it goes.

I try to be careful not to judge. One lost job, or one family crisis, and I could be shopping the sales at the cheapest place in town.
post #158 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by confustication View Post

Both the person putting together a great organic meal and taking the time to do that, and the person tossing some mac and cheese and a sliced cucumber on the table after a long day at work deserve our support as mothers. Why choose to let what someone else is eating be an issue?
Thank you - some days I am the former, some days the latter.
post #159 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just My Opinion View Post
Yes, and of course the best way to get people to change their habits is to judge, berate, lecture, and look down on them on internet forums


Local is far better for the environment than "organic" (who's standards are both lax and largely unregulated).

Are you seriously telling me the environmental impact of Annie's Cheddar Bunnies is far less than like, goldfish crackers? Maybe insofar as how the actual wheat is grown -- but the packaging/factory emissions/gas to travel/machines to process and package etc is all the same.

Unless organic foods are packaged by kittens and shipped in magical planes that run on love.

We prefer local to "organic".

As far as "crunchy" goes, I don't need validation of my "crunchiness" from anyone .

It is not snobby or elitist to want to eat healthy. We eat extremely healthy. Having the privilege of being able to purchase a $4 head of organic lettuce from 1200 miles away in the middle of winter, (as an example) yes, is extremely elitist. Judging the way others choose to feed their families without truly being in their lives and truly knowing their unique situations, finances and reasoning, yes, is very elitist.
bwahahahahah @ packaging kitties and love planes!!!

ita with everything else you said too. my nerves will not take reading this entire thread. who cares what someone eats and why, really? oh, my, oh my...the judgement. over someone eating easy mac. omg. im embarrassed at the venom getting spouted over this nonsense. i tell people in know in life to come check out the forums, but i swear, i need to tell them to be wary of the judgementalism and superiority and crunchier than thou attitudes that crop up around here.

we get some stuff organic, like milk and eggs, but i really go for locally grown fresh food over fresh organic. it's much cheaper, and local is way better for the enviroment than organic. it helps our local farmers and economy, and it tastes better, too. and you'd be surprised at how much of your local stuff is almost organic/minimally treated, or totally organic, but they don't want to go thru the hassle of certification. my in laws sell organic blueberries, never a drop of pesticide in 20 yrs, but they would have to jump thru some serious hoops to be able get that little green sticker to put on their little crop, so they just tell folks they don't/haven't used anything on the fruit.

it's great if you have access to a farmer's market, and you can actually ask the sellers about the foods they sell.
post #160 of 183
I choose not to eat much organic, but that doesn't mean that I feed my kids junk. We buy almost no processed food. I even make my own crackers. We use whole wheat when we make our own breads and pastas. I grow many of my own vegetables (organic). We eat lots of fruits and veggies.

From what I've read on this post, people seem to think non-organic = junk. That is so not true. We stay away from food dyes, HFCS, and preservatives. I feel good about what we eat. We don't do organic because I don't think it's worth the added cost. I wonder about how much regulation goes into it. "Organic" super-pasturized crapy milk? I do drink raw milk and free range eggs, because I believe those do have more nutrition.

I wash our fruits and veggies and do what we can. The money we save by buying conventional allows us to eat more fruits and vegetables and less processed foods.
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