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Parents who CHOOSE not to eat/feed their family organic - Page 9

post #161 of 183
I'm just happy the kiddo is being fed. In this economy, that's not such an easy thing.
post #162 of 183
I can afford to buy organic, but in many cases I will chose a conventionally produced product. I work in production agriculture, so I am familiar with many of the producers and will buy based on how well I like a producer and their practices over whether or not they are organic. Many conventional producers that I work with are excellent stewards of the land and I have no problem buying their products.

ETA: Sustainability is a completely separate issue from organic. Production Organic is not necessarily more sustainable than Production Conventional.
post #163 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by confustication View Post
Both the person putting together a great organic meal and taking the time to do that, and the person tossing some mac and cheese and a sliced cucumber on the table after a long day at work deserve our support as mothers. Why choose to let what someone else is eating be an issue?
Right, and it should also be remembered that it could easily be the other way around -- one person could be taking the time to put together a great, healthy (but non-organic) meal, and another person could be tossing some (organic) mac and cheese and a sliced (organic) cucumber on the table after a long day at work. And both still deserve our support as mothers.
post #164 of 183
I'd like to point out, with regard to the impact of shipping and producing orgainic foods with fossil fuels as opposed to local foods produced with fossil fuel based fertilizers - environmental impact is not the only issue. Food security is also impacted, and that isn't something that can be easily "calculated" into some kind of equation or trade-off. If agricultural land ends up under condos, it's pretty much gone, and if big ag buys all the farms, we have a lot less say in what we eat.
post #165 of 183
Remember also that it takes 3 years to convert conventional land to organic, so a lot new organic land used to be virgin land. Not only does that mean bringing new acres into production, but it means bringing water, roads, electricity, and other infrastructure into formerly virgin areas.
post #166 of 183
Quote:
Judging the way others choose to feed their families without truly being in their lives and truly knowing their unique situations, finances and reasoning, yes, is very elitist.
This!

Also, since when did it mean if I don't buy organically (and BTW, I don't have cable, THANKYOUVERYMUCH), that I automatically feed my family processed crap? I mean, really. We simply can't afford to buy 100% organic. We found a balance that works, and I think that every family should do the same.

Even if some people buy a small percentage of organic, that's a step in the right direction!

But this obnoxious "organic or die" attitude is exhausting. Do what's best for your family, and leave the rest of us non-organic/partially organic heathens alone :P
post #167 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by celestialdreamer View Post

Flame me if you want, but I find it frustrating when people pay for cable, processed food, eating out, extra consumeristic crap and then say "oh I can't afford to buy organic food". If you buy organic processed items, well then yeah the cost would be pretty high.
Yeah, but what if you've already cut all of that out of your budget and STILL can't afford organic? Is it ok to eat crap then? I mean, rice, beans, chicken, fresh fruits and eggs aren't really crap, but they aren't organic; I just can't afford it. Really.

I guess I could if I were willing to go back to work and stick my kids in the YMCA childcare afterschool/summer programs instead of homeschooling, but that thought turns my stomach almost as badly as I imagine NOT eating organic turns yours. Truth is, most families only have so much money, so they make the absolute best choices they can ... and just agree to deal with the fallout.
post #168 of 183
I don't want to add fuel to the fodder, but I wanted to try try and clarify what I think is an issue. No one ever set up an operational definition for organic versus non-organic.

To me, "organic" is not what comes certified from the USDA. When I shop at the farmer's market, I don't look for the "organic" certification, but when I talk to the producers I get to know their practices and that's good enough for me. I refuse to give the power of what is called "organic" to the gov't. - it's just a short cut word to imply what I believe food production should be. I think many people feel the same way.

I don't think we should set up a false dichotomy between those of us who buy mainly organic versus local (non-certified).

The same thing goes for meat, eggs & dairy production. I consider the meat and eggs we buy 'organic.' But technically they are pastured, non-hormone fed and do not receive antibiotics. But they aren't certified. KWIM?

Lot's of people say 'organic' as a short cut for their food practices, especially, in my case with family members that aren't as particular about food sources. I have many friends that eat "organic" per se, but not in the literal sense that many posters have assumed.

For the record though, I wouldn't freak out if my dd had a regular pop-tart, but if they were a part of her diet (they are not..), I would definitely buy the organic counter-part. I don't let her have trans-fats or HFCS as a regular part of her diet: http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...ct_id=10789574

versus an organic counter-part: http://www.amazon.com/Natures-Path-O...f=pd_sim_gro_2

For the pop-tarts, it not the 'organic' label that would sway me from not choosing the regular pop-tarts, but the non-food ingredients.
post #169 of 183
Where do you all live that you can get so many local items? I can get local food in the summer and local eggs but am I missing something? Where I can find local food year-round in New England?
post #170 of 183
I'm not going to weigh in on the main topic, but I have to say that my next-door neighbors gave us a big care package of food when my son was born, and it included a box of organic cherry-pomegranate pop-tarts, and they were GOOOOOD. :
post #171 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by lucky_mia View Post
Where do you all live that you can get so many local items? I can get local food in the summer and local eggs but am I missing something? Where I can find local food year-round in New England?
I live in CA so we are able to have year round farmer's markets here. Try typing in the type of food you're looking for, like pastured eggs, grass fed beef, etc into Google or a similar search engine along with your city/area.
post #172 of 183
I live in Winnipeg.... really short growing season....
My answer is I freeze. I can some stuff too but it has taken me awhile to get into that. I freeze tomatoes, corn, beans, peas, kale, swiss chard raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, etc. I also have a cold room and put away onions, garlic, potatoes, squash, beets, pumpkin/squash and carrots. Flour, eggs and meat I get from local farmers.
post #173 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by lucky_mia View Post
Where do you all live that you can get so many local items? I can get local food in the summer and local eggs but am I missing something? Where I can find local food year-round in New England?
We live in New Mexico. Yes, we can get local eggs, fruits & veggies locally year round if you eat seasonally at our co-op, year round CSAs and year round farmer's markets. We don't eat foods exclusively from our area, but we do our best.

I don't know anything about food production in New England, have you checked out these websites:

http://www.localharvest.org/

http://www.eatwild.com/
post #174 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by lucky_mia View Post
Where do you all live that you can get so many local items? I can get local food in the summer and local eggs but am I missing something? Where I can find local food year-round in New England?

I'm in Maine so I feel you. Though I will say that more year round CSA's are coming online up here but the reality is once the growing season is over it is hard to find year round produce. What is available is costly. I have access to meat, eggs and milk year round that is local but produce not so much. So yeah location can be a challenge to getting local food year round.

Shay
post #175 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by shayinme View Post
I'm in Maine so I feel you. Though I will say that more year round CSA's are coming online up here but the reality is once the growing season is over it is hard to find year round produce. What is available is costly. I have access to meat, eggs and milk year round that is local but produce not so much. So yeah location can be a challenge to getting local food year round.

Shay
sure can. Our FM here in Boston has been open for three weeks, but there is not much produce yet beyond lettuce, radishes, some greens, and greenhouse grown tomatoes and strawberries.
post #176 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaoma View Post
I don't want to add fuel to the fodder, but I wanted to try try and clarify what I think is an issue. No one ever set up an operational definition for organic versus non-organic.

To me, "organic" is not what comes certified from the USDA. When I shop at the farmer's market, I don't look for the "organic" certification, but when I talk to the producers I get to know their practices and that's good enough for me. I refuse to give the power of what is called "organic" to the gov't. - it's just a short cut word to imply what I believe food production should be. I think many people feel the same way.

I don't think we should set up a false dichotomy between those of us who buy mainly organic versus local (non-certified).

The same thing goes for meat, eggs & dairy production. I consider the meat and eggs we buy 'organic.' But technically they are pastured, non-hormone fed and do not receive antibiotics. But they aren't certified. KWIM?

Lot's of people say 'organic' as a short cut for their food practices, especially, in my case with family members that aren't as particular about food sources. I have many friends that eat "organic" per se, but not in the literal sense that many posters have assumed.

For the record though, I wouldn't freak out if my dd had a regular pop-tart, but if they were a part of her diet (they are not..), I would definitely buy the organic counter-part. I don't let her have trans-fats or HFCS as a regular part of her diet: http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...ct_id=10789574

versus an organic counter-part: http://www.amazon.com/Natures-Path-O...f=pd_sim_gro_2

For the pop-tarts, it not the 'organic' label that would sway me from not choosing the regular pop-tarts, but the non-food ingredients.

I am still officially stepped out of this conversation, but this post was BRILLIANT and I had to say hat I agree 1000% and couldn't have/didn't say it better myself, thank you Isaoma!
post #177 of 183
Before I came to MDC I was a crunchy person. Now apparently I am a godless heathen because I don't tow the party line.

I guess I can live with that.
post #178 of 183
I am not someone who would enjoy a regular pop-tart (just tastes nasty to me), so they aren't something I would buy for my kids, except every once in a while. BUT, I did find a big box of the Nature's Path Organic pop tarts mentioned at my local Big Lots and they were actually fairly decent tasting. No icky stuff in them like red 40 that makes me ill. Yeah, they are not whole foods and are still processed 'junk' food but a ton better tasting and better health-wise than kellogs pop tarts or the generic versions.

That's all I have to add to this discussion as someone who prefers organics for many items, but is not someone who only buys organic, and obviously not one of those people who thinks organic food is just a hype. I agree, it's about the ingredients, not the label.
post #179 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by rightkindofme View Post
Before I came to MDC I was a crunchy person. Now apparently I am a godless heathen because I don't tow the party line.

I guess I can live with that.
Hee! You made me laugh Should we start our own tribe???
post #180 of 183
I didn't read all of the replies on this thread, but here are some of my ideas. Sorry if they've been repeated.

I feel like organic is one option amongst many. For environmental and health reasons I prefer to shop locally instead of organic, I think that the food is freshest and it helps the earth a lot more. Also, quite a few small farms practice organic methods but aren't certified. Also, if I'm going to eat processed foods I don't think it's usually THAT much healthier to eat organic mac and cheese, or organic oreos. That's just me, and it's not necessarily true for those specific items. I prefer to read labels, and if the cheaper item is similar I go for that item. Of course, I am a much lower income person than upper middle class. I can't say if I would choose more organic options, or would shop differently if I had more money because I never really have.
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