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Parents who CHOOSE not to eat/feed their family organic - Page 2

post #21 of 183
They believe differently than you do. There's a good chance they're equally horrified that you would choose not to vaccinate your kids- that's a decision a lot of folks don't understand. Sometimes all we can really do is accept that other people make different choices and let it go. Maybe this is the current state of a decision to let their kids self-direct and they're just waiting for the kids to choose healthier foods.
post #22 of 183
Some people just don't care about food, really. I have a friend who's educated, well-off, etc--and the whole family eats a ton of processed food. And she is a big runner, in excellent shape. Cooking, nutrition, vegetables...are just not her thing.
post #23 of 183
I must also chime in with convienace.

My coworkers call me supermom and marvel that I go home each day and cook dinner. Except recently, I havent done it near as much. Im tired, frankly. When I cook casseroles, I always use the good whole wheat pastas etc, but sometimes my kids do get mac n cheese from a box and gasp, hotdogs.

They love it too. At least I try for chicken hotdogs.

I tried researched healthy eating and there is a lot of conflicting info out there and on here. Meat is toxic, meat is vital, eat it raw. Diary is evil, drink soy, soy is evil dont drink it. And everything is contaminated. I gave up. I told dh that the only way to be safe is to grow and raise all your own food but then you have to worry about whats in your soil and water!!!!!!!

Ive decided to eat as healthy as possible, eat what we like, even the occasional trip to mcdonalds, and hope for the best.
post #24 of 183
Why don't you set up a Vegan and a Traditional Foods believer for a debate and see if that opens your mind to the fact that people have differing ideas about what constitutes a healthy diet?
post #25 of 183
I'm kinda shocked you're surprised, actually. Most of the educated, not-struggling people i know eat crap. The exceptions are the NP crowd. There is an obesity epidemic among our children and everyone seems to think it can't happen to "their" children. In fact, we get a lot of hostility for insisting on healthy foods --and a lot of that insistence is due to food allergies, so we're not just being "picky." But, OMG, if you could see the snacks people bring for my ds's 5 yo soccer games at the Y, of all places. : It boggles the mind. And it's hard to politely refuse without being perceived as rude or snobbish.

And I hate cooking as much as the next person. We do it for our kids. And it's not about organics, but just trying to avoid artificial everything and hfcs... plus the various allergens.
post #26 of 183
A lot of organic stuff and natural stuff hasn't really been proven to be healthier. Some of it is lighter on the earth; and some stuff that's not labelled organic is probably actually better than the labelled stuff. I buy some organic stuff, some local non-organic, and some shipped from who knows where stuff that is not organic. We live in NYC, it's not the main source of pollutants for my family I imagine. Not worth shelling out extra $$ for IMO.

I buy local eggs from free-range, well-treated chickens. I don't actually think they're healthier, but they do taste better, and it's an ethics issue for me. I buy TJ milk--hormone free bc I think that makes a health difference. But not organic, bc it's too much $$ and it's less of an ethics issue for me. (I don't think organic factory cows live much better than non-organic factory cows.)

I just bought pre-made pie crusts, my pantry has lots of box mac n' cheese (Trader Joe's, not Annie's... it's 1/2 the price and the sauce melts better). I worry about demonstrated difference in nutrition first, then in taste. Between the two, I end up with fairly natural stuff with fats and caffiene and sugar and salt. That's fine and normal IMO, and I don't want them removed via chemicals. We don't use salt except in baking, literally it's in the baking drawer and guests end up asking where the salt is. I don't feel that it makes food taste better, so none of us use it. I'm NOT worried about sodium in box mac n' cheese. None of us have issues with body fat or cholesterol or anything, so as long as it's not trans fat, I'd rather naturally occuring fat than fat-removed and replaced with funky stuff instead. Same with sugar. Better than HCFS, which I do try to avoid, but not stringently. If there's something we eat/drink a lot of, I switch brands to avoid it. But DH loves his coke, and I'm not paying the $ to ship HCFS-free to us. There are bigger issues in our lives.
post #27 of 183
They're probably not overanalyzing it or thinking "This is the pinnacle of nutrition and I am a Perfect Parent for feeding this to my kids." They're probably just thinking, "This is quick, easy, and he'll eat a lot of it in one sitting."
post #28 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by reezley
Convenience? I bet if there were an Annie's Organic Easy Mac they would buy it instead. I myself make the kids Annie's Shells & Cheese way too often...
If we are going by taste, I would take Kraft easy mac over Annie's anyday. Annie's is bland, in my (and my kids) opinions. I have a cabinet full of it, and no one wants to eat it.

We eat a lot of organic, healthy foods... but we also eat "mainstream junk" too.
post #29 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by reezley View Post
Convenience? I bet if there were an Annie's Organic Easy Mac they would buy it instead. I myself make the kids Annie's Shells & Cheese way too often...
There is!!! It's good---we keep it around for emergencies. The white cheddar kind is yummmmm.
post #30 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by gcgirl View Post
Anti-organic I get, because all the "major" studies have found no nutritional difference between organic and non-organic produce.
Actually, I think that this thinking in the health/medical field has taken a turn recently. I see health & food journals articles that quote major studies that have found that organic foods fruits & vegetables AND those from animal sources (eggs, dairy and meat) are more nutritionally packed. Although, no one has come out and said this is true across the board -- i.e. one study found organic pastured eggs more nutritionally dense, another found pastured cows have more CLA, and yet another stated that carrots grown in bio-dynamic soil had more nutrients, etc.
post #31 of 183
Ease- it's much quicker and easier to drive-thru someplace than plan a meal, shop, cook, and clean up.

Habit- If you're used to FF and convenience foods, then you may just keep on keepin' on. I bet most of us have a core set of recipes we prepare over and over.

Overwhelming- A couple of years ago I tried to eliminate personal products that are NOT cruelty-free (in other words, I didn't want to buy anything anymore that was tested on animals). It was SO HARD. Every little company is owned by a bigger company that is owned by a ginormous company.... that tested on animals. It was also so expensive. I would imagine that trying to eliminate HFCS or preservatives would be much the same.
post #32 of 183
People eat crap for a variety of reasons. I don't think mac and cheese is any healthier in the organic form than it is in the nonorganic form, it is pesticide free but still not a healthy daily food choice. I make quick food sometimes when I am tired or sick, we always have fresh fruit and veggies with it though. My friend is a stay at home mom with depression and that is why she and her son eat at junk food places all the time, she can feed her kid without exerting energy she doesn't have and get him to play with other kids at the play area.

If you want to know why your friends make their food choices then you should ask them. I also think it is unfortunate to assume that bad food choices and lack of education are mostly limited to poor people. I don't know any poor people who fit the stereotypical nutrition patterns, the people in my family and amoung my friends make very health conscious choices and view foods without good nutritional value as occassional treats and food to cook when they are truly sick and exhausted. We are almost all also highly educated. Bad food choices run deeper than education and poverty.
post #33 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaoma View Post
Actually, I think that this thinking in the health/medical field has taken a turn recently. I see health & food journals articles that quote major studies that have found that organic foods fruits & vegetables AND those from animal sources (eggs, dairy and meat) are more nutritionally packed. Although, no one has come out and said this is true across the board -- i.e. one study found organic pastured eggs more nutritionally dense, another found pastured cows have more CLA, and yet another stated that carrots grown in bio-dynamic soil had more nutrients, etc.
Pastured and bidynamic soil are not the same thing as organic though. My eggs are free range, but they're not organic. The chickens sometimes get food that is not organic, hence the farmer can't label the eggs organic. However, they also live outside, eat bugs, have regular chicken lives, etc. Organic laying chickens might just eat organic corn in a tiny cage all day. Same with organic fruit/veg in many cases. Local farmers market has a couple people who don't or can't meet the organic requirements but their stuff is fantastic and healthy and local. I don't care if it's labelled organic.
post #34 of 183
I try my best to feed my family healthy meals and to get vegetables into 4 year old dss. But there sre some nights when i just don't want to spend an hour in the kitchen and a hot dog or mac and cheese only takes a few minutes. Is it great for them? No, but its not going to kill them either if had on occasion.

My guess would be that convenience is the main reason. Along with just being used/ growing up with that kinds of food. They probably don't even give it any thought.
post #35 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belia View Post
Ease- it's much quicker and easier to drive-thru someplace than plan a meal, shop, cook, and clean up.

Habit- If you're used to FF and convenience foods, then you may just keep on keepin' on. I bet most of us have a core set of recipes we prepare over and over.

Overwhelming- A couple of years ago I tried to eliminate personal products that are NOT cruelty-free (in other words, I didn't want to buy anything anymore that was tested on animals). It was SO HARD. Every little company is owned by a bigger company that is owned by a ginormous company.... that tested on animals. It was also so expensive. I would imagine that trying to eliminate HFCS or preservatives would be much the same.
In addition to these: Conformity. Many upper middle class communities are extremely homogenous and there can tremendous pressure to simply do what everyone else is doing. (I speak from experience here.)
post #36 of 183
It's interesting isn't it, what people eat and why? I had a few thoughts.

One is that if you're just judging on what they eat when you're there it might not be their regular diet. I reconnected with a childhood friend a few years ago and we each kept making each other bland food because that's what we thought the other was used to. Meanwhile we'd both changed considerably and were like, shopping special for each other. That was kind of funny.

Second I guess I sympathize a bit because growing up there were years when we pretty much ate: hamburger helper, mac & cheese, hot dogs and iceberg lettuce salad, meatloaf, spaghetti, on a sort of rotation. I have not eaten like that in years and yet when I was thinking about "what do kids eat," of course what came to mind were the things that I ate growing up. It was kind of deep culture there or something.

Third and generally, I totally agree with a PP who said some people just keep on making what they have always made. I can actually get a tofu stir fry or even a homemade pasta with a walnut-spinach pesto put together faster than many pre-prepared foods NOW but it took a few years to develop a brain that would pick those as go-to recipes... and it is not perfect, let me tell you. My thing is pizza... I intellectually know that I can make a much better meal faster than it can get here, but it is the ritual of ordering the pizza and then NOT THINKING for 30 minutes that gets me from time to time (and that is okay.)

Fourth, although I do think a healthy diet is pretty huge for me, I don't always exercise the way I should. I know I should. I used to. And I don't. I really do know all the benefits and I really would like to get with it again, and yet, on a daily basis, I choose to clean my house, sit on my porch, garden, meal plan, cook, or even just relax and post on MDC instead. It's just where I am this year. It's partly time but it's also mental energy.

I know I would feel really bad if friends were judging me on that. I can only handle so much in my life and this year, exercise is the one thing that's dropped. Maybe you could extend a bit of compassion to your friends that for whatever reason, cooking in a different way is not their thing this year.
post #37 of 183
Because it's their business what they feed their children and they don't need your stamp of approval?
post #38 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by EviesMom View Post
Pastured and bidynamic soil are not the same thing as organic though. My eggs are free range, but they're not organic. The chickens sometimes get food that is not organic, hence the farmer can't label the eggs organic. However, they also live outside, eat bugs, have regular chicken lives, etc. Organic laying chickens might just eat organic corn in a tiny cage all day. Same with organic fruit/veg in many cases. Local farmers market has a couple people who don't or can't meet the organic requirements but their stuff is fantastic and healthy and local. I don't care if it's labelled organic.
Yes! If we are judging people and their food choices, I am going to say I worry about a huge carbon footprint. I will never understand baby carrots from CA for people 3-6k miles away (although in the past I sometimes bought them). Or 'organic' spinach (and many other veggies) from China for North Americans.

There is a giant grey area that many people don't want to consider.
post #39 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by reezley View Post
Convenience? I bet if there were an Annie's Organic Easy Mac they would buy it instead. I myself make the kids Annie's Shells & Cheese way too often...
there is an annies ez mac but it is still just mac and cheese. and i think the annies mac is gross. all of it. my kids refuse to eat it. kraft . . .its the cheesiest . . .

as for why, it is just easy. and they have to money to pay for the convenience. not everyone is sold on the value of organics. or even the all natural stuff. and just because they have money doesn't mean they are inclined to spend all of it on groceries. and really most people just don't think there is anything wrong with a little easy mac or chicken nuggets. their options for replacements are expensive, not always tasty and not necessarily any better. just because it comes from a health food store doesn't make it any healthier.
post #40 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuildJenn View Post
It's partly time but it's also mental energy.
:
I'm like that about food right now. I do have a decent list of "go to" recipes, and mostly keep trucking. But, honestly, if dh didn't do all the weekend cooking, we'd probably be eating grilled cheese or PB&J multiple times each week. I just don't have the focus, concentration and energy to plan, shop for, and cook meals the way I know I should. Right now, in fact, I should be doing this coming week's meal plan (last week's got blown to hell when a stomach bug hit everyone except ds2 over the course of about three days)...and it just feels like too much work to think that hard...

We'll probably end up eating chicken korma (have ingredients on hand, because it was on last week's list), and something with ground beef, and use up a chunk of steak in the fridge. I cheat on veggies, by buying 1lb. packages of spring mix, so we eat a lot of salads. I have green beans and asparagus in the fridge and need to use them up. That's about as far as I can get with my brain in its current state...
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