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Advice for Coddling Parents: Put Baby to Sleep Alone - Page 2

post #21 of 69
If anyone needs an article to counter comments from friends/relatives, try this one.
post #22 of 69
Hm. Tell this to my 15 year old who can't keep his pants on his skinny butt, yet was never ever ever not once put to bed awake.

Crappy advice. Crappy data. Crappy information.

I hate the mainstream media.
post #23 of 69
Mindell is careful to emphasize that while her research, which was funded by Johnson & Johnson, does not support co-sleeping, it doesn't absolutely condemn it either. One question that remains: if vast numbers of babies in Asian populations are sleeping less than their Western peers — without any apparently society-wide disadvantage — does it truly matter if babies co-sleep or not?

"Do Asian babies need less sleep?" Mindell wonders, adding that understanding how some infants thrive on less sleep is the next step in research: "to figure out why that is, and what's the consequence."

Nevertheless, Mindell believes that parents should build bedtime routines that promote sound rest, though that doesn't necessarily mean babies must sleep through the night. "Waking is normal," she says. "All babies wake somewhere between two and six times per night."


Is the bottom line supposed to be that lack of "quality" sleep somehow causes health problems and the like? She hasn't proven this. It could be said that this unnatural "quality" sleep that she is promoting leads to a spike in SIDS. Where is that research across the board in these varied countries around the world?

So, what she is implying is that for most of human history, babies have been at a disadvantage because they have slept with mom and dad. Ridiculous!

Also, where is the breastfeeding correlation in this research and the benefits of it? Oh, and I love how she says that babies normally wake 1-6 times per night. So it's beneficial to trudge down the hall to attend to them? Or is she saying that they wouldn't wake this much if they weren't "coddled," which to me says that you train that out of them. CODDLING IS A NATURAL HUMAN RESPONSE! This article really makes me angry. : It's so one sided and influenced less by science and more by society.
post #24 of 69
:Puke

And this is ALL I have to say about that article.
post #25 of 69
I sent an email the the writer and a link to the Harvard study.
post #26 of 69
I like how they never mention most babies would have to cry themselves to sleep. They make it seem like they will peacefully drift off to sleep after you read a story and put them in the crib across the house. Sure.
post #27 of 69
The number of articles out there right now without credible information astounds me.

Whenever I see articles like these, I generally stop and check out the forum before I continue.

I've learned in the past if I read too many of these things, they get me riled up.

Thanks for sharing and thanks for all the feedback everyone.

This saved me some aggravation.
post #28 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamazee View Post
I couldn't get past that, just a couple of sentences in. Allowed to? LOL. No, there's no editorial content to that. How about "forced to learn to fall asleep and stay asleep on their own"?
Oh, yeah, my kids totally wanted to learn to fall asleep on their own. If only I had read this article and had the foresight to allow it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by chipper26 View Post
[COLOR="Magenta"] This article really makes me angry. : It's so one sided and influenced less by science and more by society.
Yep. I can't help it, whenever I read articles like this, I always think that the writer must either not be a parent, or be a parent trying to somehow justify what they did.
post #29 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by chipper26 View Post
I sent an email the the writer and a link to the Harvard study.
Let us know if you get a response (though I won't be holding my breath ).
post #30 of 69
That is a terrible article.
post #31 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by dachshund mom View Post
I like how they never mention most babies would have to cry themselves to sleep. They make it seem like they will peacefully drift off to sleep after you read a story and put them in the crib across the house. Sure.
Yeah exactly. If my DS would drift peacefully off to sleep, sure I would "allow" him to do that. Unfortunately, nature doesn't seem to make too many babies like that! Hmmm, why would babies be naturally inclined to want to be near their parents where they know it's safe? Makes no sense to me at all!!

And yes, Asian children are at SUCH a disadvantage due to all the coddling obviously - they don't tend to do well at all, do they?
post #32 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuamami View Post

Yep. I can't help it, whenever I read articles like this, I always think that the writer must either not be a parent, or be a parent trying to somehow justify what they did.
My second child would sleep happily anywhere through the night from birth. My first child? Not so much. My theory is that people who write articles like this have a child like my second as their first, and think the baby's "good" sleep habits are a result of their Mad Parenting Skillz rather than their baby's temperament, and they want to share those Skillz with the rest of us.
post #33 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
(This includes ds1, who woke up sobbing at the age of 15 - just a few hours before his eardrum burst from an infection. I don't care how old he is - if he wants him mom, there's a reason.)
OMG I know how painful that is! Good for you for helping him out, my mom did the same thing when this happened to me at about the age of 12? Maybe I was only 10 - it was HORRIBLE!! But, at least my mom (or maybe it was my dad? The memory isn't all that great) woke up to take me to the doctor and take care of me!

I didn't read the article. I try not to read any parenting articles/books b/c my instincts are there for a reason.

This actually made for interesting conversation the other day when my friend told me to loan her all my books when she has a baby. I said, "What books? I just do what feels right" She was SHOCKED, and really thought you needed a manual to know how to parent!
post #34 of 69
Don't worry ladies, Johnson & Johnson can help ease all your baby's nighttime fussiness:



Quote:
Sleep Care

These products are formulated with NATURALCALM™, a unique blend of patent pending essences that has been tested and proven to have relaxing properties. A nightly routine that includes a bath with JOHNSON'S® BEDTIME BATH®, followed by a baby massage with JOHNSON'S® BEDTIME LOTION®, and quiet time, is clinically proven to help babies fall asleep easier and sleep through the night better.
http://www.johnsonsbaby.com/prodPlatform.do?id=1
post #35 of 69

I'm pretty sure a relaxing bath followed by a calming massage and quiet time would help ANYONE sleep better! I wish I got that every night!
It's not the products, it's the ritual and experience. Clinically proven? I love that line - If it's between using J&J products in a bath and massage versus doing nothing, of COURSE J&J products will "help".

That article was a load of BS, and poorly written as well.

People really lack historical perspective. Most everyone thinks modern = better, and whatever someone sells them as being the more modern way to do something (i.e. easier) will automatically get fans. If people had the mindset that babies waking was normal (which it is), then infants who sttn would be seen as having problems, not vice versa.
post #36 of 69
I love that the lotion has a 1.5 rating on Amazon - the reviewers all say it has a nauseatingly strong smell. Maybe that's how it works - baby passes out from the overwhelming fragrance. YUCK!
post #37 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbbieB View Post
I find this whole article laughable.



Mmmmm. I don't trust any baby related research funded by someone who has a HUGE interest in selling me baby products.




Duh! The article fails to mention that this is NORMAL baby sleep. Oh wait, yeah it does, later on in the article it mentions babies waking 2 to 6 times a night.



Oh, thanks TIME for telling me what my problem really is. I've created a baby that trusts me to be there for them in the dark. I've coddled my child so much that they have learned to seek me out for reassurance and comfort. And my worst problem, I actually do what feels right, and what really seems to be the easiest most natural thing in the world, I nurse my baby to sleep.
RIIIIGHT, Stop co sleeping and use their bedtime bath throw away wash cloths with lavender, sleep problems solved!
post #38 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifer413 View Post
Don't worry ladies, Johnson & Johnson can help ease all your baby's nighttime fussiness:





http://www.johnsonsbaby.com/prodPlatform.do?id=1
OK, I totally missed this post before mine and I am LOL
post #39 of 69
Don't forget to make your baby his or her own customized sleep profile...

http://www.johnsonsbaby.com/Sleep/default.html

post #40 of 69
Oh good, my babies are Asian so we can co-sleep.

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