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Do people in our generation care about weed? - Page 3

post #41 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mountaingirl79 View Post
FB, with all due respect, I think you're misinformed. Do you even know any normal people who smoke or grow weed? Do you even realize that crack can literally KILL you and pot couldn't in a million years? Did you read my link?

Please don't believe all that crap. Seriously. Whew.
did you read anything i wrote about how legalizing pot brings drugs like meth into our communities??

and I wasn't hardly being serious about legalizing meth... I thought I put it on thick enough to make that clear. I was trying to illustrate just how silly it sounds to say that legalizing makes us free in some magical way. This isn't a pot issue. This is a drug issue. Do you live near pot sellers..... as in, people who make their income selling drugs? I do live near people like that and I know that while a decent amount of thier business is in pot, about 2 seconds after it was legalized they'd move toward nasty drugs like meth in order to keep profits up and support their own habits. I know a few people who are highly functioning "normal" people who smoke pot... but, it's not them I'm worried about.

Do you even get how hugely legalization would effect some communities?!?! On tuesday, we returned home after a couple days at the lake and dd was still pretty full of energy so I decided to walk down to the park with dd and ds until dh returned home from fishing. It was 7pm and lots of kids were enjoying the playground in the cooler evening air. The lawn in green and lush, the grounds are tidy, and the equiptment is new and well kept... but, across the street (DIRECTLY across the 2 laned city street, not 300 feet from the playground) 8-12, 16-26 year olds entered then soon exited a home that sell drugs... many of them probably buying pot- all in the span of time while we were at the park playing. Selling pot alone does not afford those sellers their own habbits and lifestyles. More customers for them and bit less hounding from the police would mean more motivation to up sales of illegal, higher priced drugs. There is a DIRECT link between pot sales and sales of other drugs. Functioning pot smokers aren't my concern.... the crackheads down the street are. Give me $220,000 and I'll move somewhere where I have at least 4 or 5 blocks between crack dealers and my house... then maybe I can ignore the lesser fortunate population like others seem to so easily be able to do.
post #42 of 304
I'm 28 and have never smoked MJ (or anything else), ever. But, I was raised by 2 VERY successful parents who are now in their mid-fifties, who smoke MJ almost everyday . They smoke every night after work, together. They have both been smoking it since their teen years. They aren't dependent on it, it is just somethign they enjoy. Neither have ever tried harder drugs (they certainly haven't ended up as crackheads). They believe in legalization, as do I. I just was never interested in trying it. My mom always told me as a teen that she'd rather have me smoke MJ than drink alcohol (she is from a family of alcoholics). I drink socially, but I've never taken a puff of anything. My DH agrees with us, and will have some now and then. He was raised by very conservative parents who agree with some of the staements made here. I just don't see why something less dangerous than alcohol, should be a criminal substance.

ETA: If cigarettes were made illegal, there would be a link between them and crack sales as well. If somethig is criminal is stands to reason that it would have a link to other criminal activity.
post #43 of 304
Meh................... Have you ever head of a mean pothead? I don't have too much of a problem with weed. HONESTLY, alcohol is FAR more dangerous and addictive. So why not make it ILLEGAL?
post #44 of 304
I'm 32, so on the cusp between gen X and gen Y. The only person I know who vigorously opposes the legalization of MJ is a person who works in the juvenille prison system. She things that MJ is a gateway drug and its use results in crime.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FondestBianca View Post
I've never used drugs, drank alcohol, or even taken a puff of a cigarette.... so I have zero pity for people who would miss them if they weren't an option.
You know, I used to feel that way. I didn't understand what was so great about using alcohol recreationally.... until I started drinking at the ripe old age of 30 I'm not an alcoholic, I don't drink frequently, but I've discovered that drinking occasionally really does make life more fun for me. It's not something I *have* to do, and I don't NEED it to have fun, but it is something I'd miss if it was taken away. The same way I'd miss amusement parks or board games or pizza if they were suddenly outlawed. I've never smoked MJ (although I have participated in university research studies about the effects of MJ on the social activity of mice ). But I can understand WHY people enjoy smoking it. And I certainly don't believe it should be illegal.
post #45 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by AverysMomma View Post
I need for you to think really long and really, really hard, about why you beleive this. I'm not asking you to tell ME....I'm asking you to tell YOU.
YOU don't NEED for me to do anything. If you want my answer, read my last post, above.

and I believe that some people can govern themsevles just fine. I can. I don't use drugs, smoke, eat horrible, drive dangerously, steal, cheat on my taxes, abuse anyone or anything, etc, etc, etc... and I still wouldn't even if there were no laws to tell me to or not to do so. Others however, need some mentoring.

I'm not focusing on the health aspect of pot at this point.... though everyone who has responded to what I've said seems to pinpoint that for some odd reason. Pot IS part of the reason so many cities and neighborhoods are declining. Think about the mentality and motivation of dealers.... not users. Users hurt those close to their hearts, dealers hurt those within a 5 mile radius.
post #46 of 304
I hate to break it to you but moving to a "better" neighborhood doesn't mean the crack dealers are not there, they're just better at hiding it.
post #47 of 304
post #48 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by AverysMomma View Post
I need for you to think really long and really, really hard, about why you beleive this. I'm not asking you to tell ME....I'm asking you to tell YOU.

Everything you believe, you believe, because you have been shown....there is no thought that enters into your conciousness out of nowhere.....who needs you to believe that we as a people are unable to properly govern our own lives?? WHO? And did it ever occur to you, that there could be another way? Of course not, why would that ever pop into your mind...who would want to give you that idea? Nobody who is in charge of "ideas", that's for sure.

And, ask yourself this: Which came first; the big government which tells you how to live, or the people who believed they needed big government to tell them how to live.

And an even better question: Which came first; the people who live like animals as a direct result of big government "aide/welfare/social programs(including public schools)...or big government.

The myth, that we are incapable of ruling our own lives...that the absence of obcenely large government would surely bring chaos and riots and crime in the streets, complete with mass rape and drug lords taking over the planet....is just that, a myth....albeit a VERY convenient one, for some people.

I'm not telling you what to believe....I'm asking you to examine your beliefs...to challenge yourself not only to decide....but to investigate what MAKES you decide.

Someone challenged me to do this very thing years ago...and the rollercoaster ride of joy at discovering truth...and sorrow at discovering how different that truth is, from the truth we are taught....has been crazy. Sometimes, it makes me feel lonely and scared, to know how very bad things are, how much of an illusion this created reality actually is.....but at least now I know. There is that.


amen.

fondestbianca...i also come from a place of respect...and live in a town that has a lot of drugs in it.

my point of view is that is that currently pot is completely accessible to people under the age of 24 or so...then as people get older it gets harder to come by, unless they really keep up contacts because they are regular smokers.

if it were decriminalized--not even made legal...just not grounds for jail time and major fines...i believe the problem would become bigger...because people would still be reliant on the same drug dealers to get the pot. the dealers that are also selling and mixing pot with other more dangerous substances.

if it were made completely legal...where people would be allowed to grow their own plants...then i think we would actually see less people who enjoyed the occassional smoke, contributing to or becoming victims of those "bad egg" dealers.

i also think we would see less people getting hooked on those harder drugs...since instead of coming into regular contact with dealers who are trying to push harder drugs on them...they are just snipping a little piece of home grown pesticide and violence free bud from their very own plant.

As for those dealers turning to harder drugs in order to finance the loss they incurred from pot legalization...I would say that hopefully with such a drastic change police efforts could actually be more focused on hard drug producers and dealers...and more money could be spent on rehabbing their victims...once the time and cost of arresting and incarcerating mj users has been erased. Also, as a side note, I've read that MJ selling does not produce much profit anyway...)

I fully appreciate your point of view, though, because before now, I would not have thought about how dealers would compensate for the lack of $$ coming in from pot sales.
post #49 of 304
Tracy - first you say if pot is legal then dealers will turn to meth which which would be a bad thing for your neighborhood - then you say pot IS the reason neighborhoods are declining.

Can you tell me exactly how you feel pot - not other drugs - is responsible? Honestly curious. Your argument sounds very much like the DARE "gateway drug" bs.

I smoke. Have since I was a teen off and on. Everyone I know smokes, or has smoked and does not have a problem with it. And I'm living in a conservative southern state - it was even more out in the open when I lived in Cali. Doctors, Vets, lawyers - and dh and I - professional, responsible parents. Pot is so much less destructive than liquor. It is illegal for stupid, political reasons that have NOTHING to do with it's danger, or ruining of neighborhoods.

I'm always amazed at the few here at MDC that still buy into the propaganda and lies surrounding pot.
post #50 of 304
i forgot to add something pertaining to the beginning of my last post...

it sucks that the younger people are the ones who are most in contact with dealers. they know where to get the drugs, all of them. as i got older the range of drugs i could get dwindled...now its hard if i want to find some mj. impossible for anything else.

in my opinion if people were allowed to grow for personal consumption less kids would be exposed to these hard core dealers when so young. these dealers prey on the young. its amazing that i could find X and special k, and coke in hs but wouldn't know where to begin finding it now.
post #51 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by FondestBianca View Post
Pot IS part of the reason so many cities and neighborhoods are declining. Think about the mentality and motivation of dealers.... not users. Users hurt those close to their hearts, dealers hurt those within a 5 mile radius.
If it were legalized, there wouldn't be pot dealers.
post #52 of 304
Quote:
With pot would come other drugs. It's not as cut and dry as it sounds. Maybe to a strictly pot smoker it sounds pretty simple and harmless but, for my neighborhood and my children it would mean much rougher drugs moving in across the street from the playground... (literally, across the street from where the city's little one's play). I'm not about to vote more of that to my backdoor and I'd appreciate others not. It's about the big picture not the self centered view of how it wouldnt' change your life, so no big deal.
Um, those drugs are out there. In massive quantities. And obviously keeping pot illegal isn't exactly slowing down the drug trade at all.

Most of the pot smokers I know, are just that. Pot smokers. They don't use meth or any of the other hard drugs. I really don't see pot as any worse at all than alcohol. The government spends an insane amount of time and money dealing with pot. They could use that money instead for fighting drugs that do major damage.

Quote:
then maybe I can ignore the lesser fortunate population like others seem to so easily be able to do.
Moving isn't a guarantee of anything. I live outside an extremely small, extremely rural town. We have a huge meth problem here. And the fact that some people see legalization as a good thing, doesn't mean we're deaf and blind to the "less fortunate".
post #53 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post
If it were legalized, there wouldn't be pot dealers.
OMgoodness!!!!!!! How can I make my point clear????

this is exactly my point. People who make a good deal or all of their income selling pot would MOST LIKELY up their sales of other, more dangerous, deadly, hazardous drugs to keep their lifestyle close to the same and keep income coming in. THAT is the problem!!!!!!!!!!!
post #54 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by FondestBianca View Post
OMgoodness!!!!!!! How can I make my point clear????

this is exactly my point. People who make a good deal or all of their income selling pot would MOST LIKELY up their sales of other, more dangerous, deadly, hazardous drugs to keep their lifestyle close to the same and keep income coming in. THAT is the problem!!!!!!!!!!!
So keeping pot illegal gives those dealers a "safer" drug to peddle and keeps them from putting more dangerous stuff out there?
post #55 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post
If it were legalized, there wouldn't be pot dealers.

limab...i think what shes saying is that they would all turn into meth dealers.

the dealers i know now would not turn to meth or anything else hard. they would ask for more hours at their crappy job that doesn't pay them enough.
post #56 of 304
ok.

seriously.

nevermind.

I can't explain it any other way. This is starting to get really sad! I'm so done. My head is going to explode if I have to find another way to try to describe my thoughts accurately.
post #57 of 304
The only person I know who thinks pot should be illegal is my seventy-three year old grandmother. She also thinks that alcohol should be illegal. She is a strict Southern Baptist... who drinks brandy at night, so she is also a hypocrit. In my experience, most people who have a serious problem with pot have some sort of personal vendetta against it. They rarely think their arguments through, and they resort to using scare tactics and emotionalism instead of reason.

I don't smoke pot. I tried it when I was younger, and all it did was make me eat everything in the house. But I know plenty of people who responsibly enjoy this substance, and other people who choose not to because of its illegality, but would use it sometimes if it were legal. They are all adults... and for the record, none of the pot-smokers that I know use meth or anything, either. If there is a gateway drug out there, I believe it is alcohol, not pot.
post #58 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evie's Mama View Post
I'm opposed to it's legalization because I've seen it's effects on young people. I used to teach 8th grade in a very poor area and had a few students who would show up high to school. It was clearly negatively effecting them. My fear is that making it legal would lead to even more kids smoking it. It seems to me that when something is made legal, kids don't understand that it is still dangerous. These are kids who explained to me that cigarettes aren't really that bad because if they were they would be illegal...this is the kind of thinking some of our youth has.
You should check out these stats on effects of marijuana decriminalization. They compare Netherlands (where MJ is decriminalized) and the US. Education on drugs/cigarettes/alcohol is very important. I'm not leaving it up to the schools to teach my children. They're 7 and 5 and it's already an ongoing discussion in our home. I don't tell them it's okay to use any of those, but I also tell them dh and I will be honest with them on this topic.
post #59 of 304
I don't think it should be illegal and most people I know (unless they have some misinformation) don't feel it should be illegal either - most of us feel strongly that there needs to be regulation along with it's legalization. I definitely think it should be more understood and that schools need to offer classes on responsible drug use - including everything from otc cold meds, caffeine, prescription drugs, nicotine & alcohol to mj and so on. Sooo many kids today are hooked on prescription drugs! I'm far more worried about that, than mj!

We need to evolve from illegalizing & banning everything that could possibly be abused, to educating ourselves and then making informed decisions for our own lives.
post #60 of 304
I think pot should be legal. I'm in BC, 91% of my province thinks pot should be legal.

I have smoked pot and still do on occasion. I have used other drugs in my time, but that was more of misspent youth then anything else.

I have never heard of a hard core drug dealer who sells only pot. The only people I know who sell only pot, sell it to friends who they know smoke it. They do that because they are the one who actually grows it. These people wouldn't really be affected if pot were legalized because they have other jobs and don't rely on drugs to make money. The ones that do, already sell meth and 101 other drugs.
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