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post #21 of 35
I too have concerns about ingesting silver, especially due to the difficulty in creating a safe product. Topical silver gel, I'm comfortable.

However, the myth associated with the lavender and boys was dispelled, per my understanding.

Apparently, the OTHER ingredients in the lavender-scented soap and skin lotions, or shampoos or styling products were not considered as possible sources of endocrine disruptor. Denver endocrinologist Clifford Bloch hypothesized the link after three boys presented with enlarged breasts.
http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/jan2007/niehs-31.htm

However, the conclusion that the gynecomastia was actually caused by the essential oils in the products used by the three boys are currently being disputed by the Natural Artisan Perfumers Guild and Cropwatch on the claimed basis of insufficient evidence.


I use lavender essential oil for skin abrasions, cuts, and scrapes on our son.



Pat
post #22 of 35
And if there were a potential problem with lavendar oil, I would think it would result from long-term use/exposure, rather than using it to treat an acute infection.

OP - glad to read that your son's staph responded to your poultice!
post #23 of 35
Thread Starter 
The silver hydrosol that DS is taking is called Argentyn 23. Apparently it is the only silver hydrosol available by prescription. I found a document that lists FDA-approved silver products, which lists this product (even though it is not actually FDA approved, it is of the same standard as those that are.)

I am reluctant to list the website of the company that makes the product as a source (only b/c it wd be biased), but there is some interesting information there regarding safety.

This morning the arm is visibly lighter in color, but still warm and firm, but not *as* warm.
post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amylcd View Post
We always treat DD's MRSA with bactroban (antibiotic) cream. None of the natural remedies we tried worked, including the honey.
A OTC cream like polysporin won't kill staph/MRSA but bactroban will. I'm surprised the doctor didn't give it along with the prescription. I'm glad he's responding to your treatment!!
post #25 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by WuWei View Post
However, the myth associated with the lavender and boys was dispelled, per my understanding.
I'm not sure why a study published in the NEJM would be considered a myth, nor am I sure who properly dispelled it. The study was an observation of three cases of breast growth in pre-pubescent boys that resolved upon the discontinuation of the lavender containing products. These observations led the researchers to test the oils on human cells which resulted in estrogenic activity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WuWei View Post
Apparently, the OTHER ingredients in the lavender-scented soap and skin lotions, or shampoos or styling products were not considered as possible sources of endocrine disruptor. Denver endocrinologist Clifford Bloch hypothesized the link after three boys presented with enlarged breasts.
http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/jan2007/niehs-31.htm
That is correct. Seeing three boys with pre-pubescent breast growth in boys was significant enough to give pause given the unusual nature of the condition. Careful observations such as these are often what lead us to do more research on a subject. Sometimes they go nowhere but often they are only the tip of the iceberg.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WuWei View Post
However, the conclusion that the gynecomastia was actually caused by the essential oils in the products used by the three boys are currently being disputed by the Natural Artisan Perfumers Guild and Cropwatch on the claimed basis of insufficient evidence.
This appears to be a reference still awaiting citation in the Wikipedia entry on this subject. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lavender_oil. I don't know anything about the Natural Artisan Perfumers Guild or Cropwatch, what their authority or interest is. Nor do I know what scientific evidence they have, if any, for disputing this information. The Wikipedia entry, if trustworthy, also states:

Quote:
"Subsequently, Derek Henley and Kenneth Korach of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in Research Triangle Park, N.C., discovered in lavender and tea tree oil the presence of compounds which both suppress male hormones and mimic female hormones.

Because sex hormone levels are normally low prior to puberty, young boys and girls are particularly sensitive to estrogenic and androgenic compounds. The discovery of the gynecomastia link in boys has led some researchers to suspect lavender and tea tree oils, which are present in various personal care products including shampoos and lotions, may also contribute to the increased incidence of early breast development in girls.

Discontinuation of use of these products resulted in rapid reversal of gynecomastia in Bloch’s young patients."
I was alerted to the issue with lavender oil when I read the original study in the NEJM in 2007. I also read the subsequent 'Letters to the Editor.' I still believe the evidence is compelling enough to warrant concern. Children are hitting puberty earlier - could it be due to to our increased use of endocrine disruptors? As a sufferer of IGT, I think I was likely was exposed to endocrine disruptors before or during puberty; we need to pay close attention to all possible culprits. There are plenty of people who believe BPA is safe - it doesn't mean it is. Impartiality is key. We should be wary of all observed correlations between various substances and our endocrine system, whether they relate easily disliked synthetic plastics or more easily liked natural topical applications.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WuWei View Post
I use lavender essential oil for skin abrasions, cuts, and scrapes on our son.
I think that minor cuts, abrasions, etc. are generally best left alone to heal unless signs of infection develop. Personally, I am as skeptical of using 'natural' products unnecessarily as I am of using antibiotics. Studies have shown that lavender oil may be a good candidate for antibacterial products. I wouldn't use an antibacterial soap whether it contained triclosan or lavender.
post #26 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by ASusan View Post
And if there were a potential problem with lavendar oil, I would think it would result from long-term use/exposure, rather than using it to treat an acute infection.
I agree. However, in my opinion concern is still warranted. When we find something 'natural' that we like, we often tend to begin to overuse it as preventative medicine under the 'natural' and 'safe' guise.
post #27 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by OliveJewel View Post
This morning the arm is visibly lighter in color, but still warm and firm, but not *as* warm.
I'm glad it is looking better! On an upper arm, I know it might be difficult, but did you do salt water soaks? I've had amazing results with those.
post #28 of 35
Thread Starter 
I really *wanted* to do epsom salt soaks, but I just couldn't figure out the logistics of it--other than laying all the way down in a bath full of salt water or wrapping soaked cloths around it-- neither of which seemed would work very well, especially since the source of the infection was only an inch or two below his shoulder.

I say "was" because it's gone! This morning there is just a hint of warmth on the area closest to his elbow (the last tissue area to be damaged). The upper arm is completely normal looking except for a little bit of exfoliation--it looks like a little tinea tried to take advantage of the situation, but it only got a little bigger than a pencil eraser. The tissue is soft and supple and cool and same color as the rest of his skin.

I wouldn't have believed that this was possible unless I saw it with my own eyes! I had a staph infection on my leg a few years ago that I tried to treat on my own with honey (commercial grade-WRONG!) and maybe Vit C and just "thinking well". JOKE! That thing just kept spreading on my leg over almost a week until I got some antibiotics. And even then, the first antibiotic didn't work, so we had to switch to another one that I was allergic to, but took Claritin to combat the allergic reaction!

I am so proud of my son for healing so well! My mom and DH joke, "Oh, maybe it was the three doses of cephalexin he took." Yeah, sure! Today is Day Four since I noticed it (but I think he got poked or bit on Sunday) and it is for all intents and purposes gone! We are going back to the doc this morn for a follow up. I will be beaming!
post #29 of 35
Just add the Epsom salts to bath water. That will help with detoxing. Don't have to have the body part in the soak for benefits. Max benefits with direct soaking, though.

Oh, and check out The Master Tonic for systemic issues.


serenitii, I love your research and analysis.




Pat
post #30 of 35
I have friends that love silver and use it often to combat infections with great results. With that said, I've never used it. I'm afraid my skin will turn silver! Have you tried any essential oils for topical treatments? There are great things being said about a few. Here are some links to support the idea that they work:

Essential oils 'combat superbug'

The effect of essential oils on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus using a dressing model.

Oregano Oil May Protect Against Drug-Resistant Bacteria, Georgetown Researcher Finds

Hope this helps!
post #31 of 35
Does the naturopath have your son on any kind of liver support? Definitely make sure that he is monitoring whether or not the silver is clearing the liver. I don't really trust this whole "smaller than normal silver molecules" thing with taking silver internal.
post #32 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by serenitii View Post
... I'd be more afraid of the silver than cephalexin. Cephalosporin are probably one of the safer antibiotics. Why is silver more 'natural' or safer? Cephalosporin compounds were first isolated from sewers; how much more natural is that? What evidence exists that a cephalosporin is more risky than silver or vice versa? Who regulates the recommended silver formulations to ensure proper silver content? (There have been reports of inconsistent formulations.) What are the possible side effects of both options, particularly in children? These are the questions I would ask myself.

Also, this may be a little off-topic but I would be cautious with lavender, particularly on boys. I highly suspect it is an endocrine disruptor. Lavender may work in ways similar to the hormone oestrogen. It has been suspected of inducing breast growth in a few pre-pubescent boys whose mothers were using topical applications containing lavender oil. (Their breasts returned to normal after stopping the applications.) This is probably more of side-effect of long-term use but I'd still be cautious. There was lavender in my dishwasher soap while I suffered infertility. Was it a contributing factor? Who knows.
: ... to all of it! And, with regard to the use of lavender with boys - the risks were first documented, years ago. There was something in the New England Journal of Medicine that got mentioned on the NIH site ... I'll go find a link. (OK, here's one: http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/abstract/356/5/479)
post #33 of 35
just my $.02:

after watching our ds's mrsa fail to respond to batroban and a couple of different courses of antibiotics (including keflex), dh & i agreed to ditch the docs. we continued the same mind-blowingly-tedious hygiene, but stopped the abx, started giving ds probiotics and lots of sodium ascorbate, and applied "really raw" honey to his infection (totally unheated, more viscous than most honeys, and includes the propolis). we are grateful to God the infection was completely gone within two weeks (just in the nick of time for my sanity's sake; our second child was born just a few days later!)

hth!
post #34 of 35
Thread Starter 
user_name, that's wonderful that you got a hold of the infection! Such a scary experience! What is sodium ascorbate again?
post #35 of 35
Sodium ascorbate is a buffered from of Vitamin C and less acidic than some other forms of Vitamin C. But, as it is a source of sodium, it is not appropriate for anyone needing to restrict salt.
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