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How would you arrange a brand new kitchen?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Hi...

Looking for a little help in deciding how to lay out my kitchen. My partner and I just bought a 105 yr old house, and the kitchen was about 5' x 16' so that is becoming the laundry/1/2 bathroom. The first room we enter from outside is what has been used as a kitchen, and has the 220 for the stove. The room is about 17' x 15' and has doors in 3 corners, wainscoting all around, and no counters. I'll see if I can dig out a pic for you.

Anyway, I just don't even really know how to begin to fantasize about it, but I don't want to let work begin without taking a serious chance to think about what would work.

Fanatsies? Ideas? Practical considerations?
post #2 of 23
I use drawing software to create a pseudo-architectural layout of any room I want to rearrange or muck with. I use a scale of 1 mm = 1 inch, so if a room is 10 feet by 10 feet, I have a 10-square centimeter block to work with, and it all fits on my screen but isn't too tiny.

ANYWAY, measure everything in the room and create your drawing. Mark the locations & sizes of all the doors, windows, outlets & switches, vents/radiators/etc. and then group all the images together and lock it to prevent changes to that main image. Now you have an empty room.

Then you can play "above" that master drawing to your heart's content, without having to erase things or hold your breath to keep from blowing the stove off your layout. You can save each layout you like, and print them all out!

Get a kitchen & bath catalog and refer to it for standard sizes of cabinetry, and you can increase how accurate your drawing is. For kitchens, remember the "work triangle" that's created by the stove, fridge, and sink. Also consider if you want the kitchen to be eat-in -- with a table? or a breakfast bar? Do you do a lot of baking? Do you want an island? What will its function be? Do you chop food directly on the counter, or use a cutting board? Do you want a microwave over the range, or under the counter? Do you want built-in pantry space, or will that be in an existing nearby closet? What things do you NOT keep in your kitchen now that you wish you could? What things would you find a better home for? What do your kids need to be able to access easily? What's the largest thing you wash in your sink? Do you need to be able to see the kids in a certain room (or in the backyard) while you're in the kitchen? Do you like your small appliances out & ready, or tucked away but easy to access? How much cabinet space do you have now? Does it meet your needs? What kinds of space do you need more of (for dishes & cups, or for pots & pans, or for food staples, etc.)? What kinds do you need less of? How much light do you need over the stove? sink? prep area?

I know none of those are actual IDEAS, but that's kind-of where I started when I redesigned my two bathrooms. They were finished 2 years ago, & are still my favorite rooms and the easiest for me to keep clean b/c they work so well for me.

I hope some of this helps . . .
post #3 of 23
I'd download the IKEA kitchen planning software (free) and design on there. But, of course, I'd also use IKEA cabinets. . .

Catherine
post #4 of 23
We also used the ikea software to do ours.

Our house was built approx 1870's. The kitchen was terrible. Once we got our heads around the idea that we could change the existing walls/windows/doors it made it much easier (although a little more structural work). Because when you have a window (ours were all low) or door in every wall it is very difficult to work in a long run of countertop/cabinets.
post #5 of 23
Suggestion #1) Don't get Viking appliances! :

My mom just did a big kitchen remodel a couple years ago, and did the whole kitchen around her dream oven: a 48" six-burner Viking oven. Cost as much as a small car, and does not work.

Anyway . . . she got several catalogs from the kitchen/bath store, and spent days going through them. Other than the stove that doesn't work, the only thing I don't like about her kitchen is the dishwasher is too far from the sink.

My new fantasy: concrete and recycled glass countertops. I saw some last week, and was blown away by how beautiful they are!

Have fun! I l-o-v-e old houses.
post #6 of 23
IME I find that going to kitchen design centers very helpful. Work with a designer a little. They help you with layout and give you a price for the cabinets. They understand you are shopping around for price. But many of the kitchen designers can be so helpful with layout and thinking of things you may not. I remember once working with one who took inventory of your small appliances and pots/pans.

Play with cabinets at lowes and other places and see what is available. I personally hate cabinets where you open the door and then have a pull out shelf for example. I would rather have one big drawer. Less banging around and stuff cannot fall off that little shelf inside and get stuck.

Look at lots of magazines for ideas.

Think about what you use most and location. When I last designed a kitchen I put the fridge nearest the tv room door. That way DH could easily grab a drink without having to get in my way while I was cooking.

I also have a tendency to scope out sales on appliances and so forth ahead of time so often I have things of a certain size. Like my $400 sink I picked up for $100. That determined my sink cabinet size. Also decide if you want a wall oven or free standing range etc.
post #7 of 23
Don't make the mistake of having everything too far apart, just because the room itself is big. Keep your major bits (the sink, stove, fridge) fairly close together, to make cooking a lot easier. Basically, think a small kitchen, *surrounded* by extra storage, hanging-out space, or whatever rather than a big, sprawling kitchen.

Have at least one 3-4' span of counter, adjascent to either the stove or the sink (ideally between them, or beside one & across from the other, or as an island), with no cabinet over it, to be the main workspace.

To me, having a properly vented (i.e. to the outside) hood over the range is ideal. Not one of those cheapie, run-through-a-filter-and-back-into-the-room types, or a trendy down-draft models they put on island stoves.

Just a few ideas, your mileage may vary.
post #8 of 23
I saw This Old House mock up a kitchen with cardboard boxes. I think I'd do that. There are some rules you do need to follow, like it's not code to have a stove under a window.

Kitchen fantasies... I love full height pantries, and a wall oven rather than a range.

Quote:
Don't make the mistake of having everything too far apart, just because the room itself is big. Keep your major bits (the sink, stove, fridge) fairly close together, to make cooking a lot easier. Basically, think a small kitchen, *surrounded* by extra storage, hanging-out space, or whatever rather than a big, sprawling kitchen.

Have at least one 3-4' span of counter, adjascent to either the stove or the sink (ideally between them, or beside one & across from the other, or as an island), with no cabinet over it, to be the main workspace.

To me, having a properly vented (i.e. to the outside) hood over the range is ideal. Not one of those cheapie, run-through-a-filter-and-back-into-the-room types, or a trendy down-draft models they put on island stoves.
Oh, yes, yes, yes.
post #9 of 23
You need to visit the GardenWeb kitchen forum! Plenty of TKO (totally-kitchen-obsessed) folks there. When we were planning our kitchen/dining room remodel some of them actually drew up a kitchen design for me, they are all very helpful!

http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/ (click on Kitchens)
post #10 of 23
I like having the stove, sink, fridge and dishwasher fairly close together for ease of use. Ideally, you'd have some space on either side of the sink and stove (and maybe the fridge, too) to set things down.

I like being able sweep crumbs directly into the sink, so I prefer a countertop with a sink that is set in, so it's easy to just brush things into the sink.

A good vent to the outside for the stove is great.

It's nice to have some storage near your dishwasher or dish rack so that it's easy to put dishes away once they are clean.

Personally, I like to have a lot of clear space in front of the oven for safety; it makes it easier to take hot things out and not get burned. But I've worked professionally in kitchens that didn't and it was fine. A wall oven, which is higher up, is even nicer.

If you are an appliance junkie like me, having an appliance garage is really nice. It can take lots of different forms (on the counter with tambour roll up doors, or a corner cabinet with lazy susans, or a tall cabinet with shelves). But I use mine every day and LOVE It.
post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ola_ View Post
You need to visit the GardenWeb kitchen forum! Plenty of TKO (totally-kitchen-obsessed) folks there. When we were planning our kitchen/dining room remodel some of them actually drew up a kitchen design for me, they are all very helpful!

http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/ (click on Kitchens)
OMG THIS!!! I was just going to post this. We used this site too when we were doing our kitchen remodel (and bathroom and patio and and and). This is THE PLACE to get your info. My kitchen would not be half as great without this site. It made a huge difference for us. Just be prepared to up your budget.
post #12 of 23
can you all link the ikea kitchen software? i could really use it.
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ian'smommaya View Post
can you all link the ikea kitchen software? i could really use it.
Here you go:

http://www.ikea.com/ms/en_US/rooms_i...hplanners.html

BTW, there is a very helpful forum at ikeafans with people who will critque your design!


Catherine
post #14 of 23
thanks! i found it. duh google search. i thought it only did kitchens but it can do every room. omg. this is fabulous! how have i moved previously without this incredible tool?


oh yeah, i didnt own anything. :
post #15 of 23
I third the gardenweb kitchen forums. I've been nosing around there for the past month or so and trying to absorb some knowledge.

You might also go to Lowe's or HD and set up an appt with a kitchen designer. It's free (at Lowe's at least) and they'll give you a print out of your design and prices of your choice of cabinets. There are many things you need to keep in mind when designing a kitchen, like the amount of walkspace you need. 48" is optimal for two people working together. 42" is a "butt and a half" kitchen. 38" is pretty much the minimum. There are many more little "rules" like that and a KD or the folks at garden web will help you with those.

Have fun!

P.S. Google also has free 3D software for download called "SketchUp". I've downloaded it (IKEA's software doesn't work on Macs ), but haven't actually tested it out yet.
post #16 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks ladies! I'll be doing some playing around!
post #17 of 23
Just one suggestion from me: Don't place your refrigerator in a spot where the door opens so that you can't set down whatever you're retrieving on the adjacent countertop. My fridge door blocks my adjacent counter top when it's open, so I can't move things from the open fridge to the counter.
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by becoming View Post
Just one suggestion from me: Don't place your refrigerator in a spot where the door opens so that you can't set down whatever you're retrieving on the adjacent countertop. My fridge door blocks my adjacent counter top when it's open, so I can't move things from the open fridge to the counter.
On some fridges, you can reverse the swing of the door. We did that on ours. If you can find the manual (check online, too), it should say if that's a feature of your fridge.
post #19 of 23
My fridge has landing space on the counter opposite of it (it's a u-shaped kitchen). Since it's a french door fridge using space directly beside it wouldn't work that well. Actually we have some on one side and I don't use it, I pivot and use the opposite counter instead.
post #20 of 23
I have a 1 year old kitchen that I was not allowed to design- and these are the things I would have done differently..

1) do not put refrigerator in a corner. Put it against a wall.. Mine is in a corner, and when the door is full open it is perpindicular to the rest of the fridge.. mine has compartments in the door (as most do) so it is nearly impossible to remove the drawers to clean.. If I could open the door more fully (ie no wall behind my open door) pull the drawers out to clean would be a snap).. Also do not place the refrigerator RIGHT against the oven.. the oven will heat, the refrigerator will kick up to cool back down- it is an energy waster... don't put them too far apart though because you will need to take things out of the fridge to put on the stove.. or in the oven..

Also, I think the area above cabinets generally is very wasted space. I have one cabinet in the corner that goes all the way to the ceiling. I wish they all did that.

I actually use my table a lot to prepare foods (my sons love to help measure and mix) so I don't use the countertops much in terms of preparation.. it is just a place to sit the blender and the knife set honestly..so my perfect kitchen would the wall set of double ovens, a small countertop away from a vented stove top, a small countertop away from the sink or fridge.. and the furthest wall would have floor to ceiling built in pantry like my mother's kitchen has (pull out drawers, etc).. I would add a broom closet and small appliance storage onto that..

big table/island/or breakfast bar combo in the center.
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