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Waldorf Homeschoolers Thread - Page 20

post #381 of 397
simplify4balance - You might find this link helpful.
post #382 of 397
Question for you Waldorfy mamas, how do you do the seasons part when you live somewhere without classic seasons? We have four seasons, sort of, but it would take a lot of attention and also pretending to make them all out. Mostly though, we just have two seasons; wet and raw and cool, and HOT humid and dry as can be.

DS has seen snow a few times, so he understands what it is fine. But, it's not at all the rhythm we lead.

And, that just leaves me confused.
post #383 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Past_VNE View Post
Question for you Waldorfy mamas, how do you do the seasons part when you live somewhere without classic seasons? We have four seasons, sort of, but it would take a lot of attention and also pretending to make them all out. Mostly though, we just have two seasons; wet and raw and cool, and HOT humid and dry as can be.

DS has seen snow a few times, so he understands what it is fine. But, it's not at all the rhythm we lead.

And, that just leaves me confused.
No reason to "make up" the seasons if they don't exist where you live! Use your geographic area as a guide for your own nature stories. Observe and watch what your local animals are doing at certain times of the year, etc. If not much changes, so be it. It is what it is!

Your "season" will also revolve around what festivals you participate in (not sure where you are), so maybe focus more on that then the "snow in winter that never comes".
post #384 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by simplify4balance View Post
Hello all!
My DD is about to turn 5.
I love Waldorf... but I wonder if she will truly be learning enough?
She can already read... mostly just from reading cuddled up in my lap. She loves workbooks, though I only do them with her if she asks. It just seems that she could learn so much academically right now... not to mention that she seems like she could happily fall into a solid routine of doing school work everyday. She enjoys practicing writing letters and numbers and always seems to be discovering interesting letter and number facts on her own by being mindful of the world around her.
So I thought that I would purchase some type of Waldorf curriculum (mostly to keep us moving forward with homeschooling in an organized way which makes me feel confident that I am ACTUALLY Doing Something with her) and then supplement it with workbooks and gently teaching her math and reading as she requests it. Or I considered buying a a complimentary academic curriculum to supplement our Waldorf work.
The more I read about Waldorf... the more unsure I am that she should even be working on anything academic? But I am feeling nervous that she won't be exactly on par with her school attending peers as far at the 3 R's go.
Can I really just teach her a Waldorf curriculum and have faith that she will eventually learn all the 'regular' stuff when she is a bit older?
What about when she wants to do more formal learning- eg. workbooks, handwriting practice? Seems silly to discourage her!
Please, please give me some loving and balanced ideas as well as resources.
(I think that the Oak Meadow curriculum includes some academics?)
It sounds to me like you already have your mind made up! If you aren't comfortable with the what's and the why's behind Waldorf (what is introduced at what age and why it is done then), then there is no reason to pursue this for your daughter. Take what you like about Waldorf (I am assuming it is the arts, stories, and large focus on nature) and incorporate that into your life.

Good Luck!
post #385 of 397
Anyone have a nice verse for after main lesson or any other transition time in your waldorf homeschool?
Circle time to start our day, but I thought having a verse for each transition might be nice too and then a nice one to end our day

Chandi
post #386 of 397

Read throu alot of this thread and decided to bump :)

post #387 of 397

Subbin' ... I have a 2 year old and we're just starting to think about homeschool.  I'll probably find some ideas when I read back through the thread, but I would love some resources for getting started with waldorf homeschool and also for the early years too.  I've looked up some of the book recs I've seen, but the libraries here just don't have them, and I never see any waldorf resources at the used bookstore... is there a used or cheaper option to find these while I'm trying to figure out if this is for me?

post #388 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by treehugz View Post

Subbin' ... I have a 2 year old and we're just starting to think about homeschool.  I'll probably find some ideas when I read back through the thread, but I would love some resources for getting started with waldorf homeschool and also for the early years too.  I've looked up some of the book recs I've seen, but the libraries here just don't have them, and I never see any waldorf resources at the used bookstore... is there a used or cheaper option to find these while I'm trying to figure out if this is for me?



:hug I am trying to figure this all out as well.  I will try to make a list for you of where I am getting my info from.

 

http://www.waldorfjourney.typepad.com/ 

This blog has been super helpful. 

 

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/homeschoolingwaldorf/ 

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/waldorfhomeeducators/ 

Yahoo groups

 

That is to start. :)

post #389 of 397

Another great blog:

 

http://theparentingpassageway.com/ 

post #390 of 397

How many pages does it have to be, before it can be a new thread?

post #391 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommariffic View Post

How many pages does it have to be, before it can be a new thread?



Wee could pick a number! :D

post #392 of 397

We're very new to Waldorf, discovered this a bit late. We're starting off our Waldorf homeschool journey using Oak Meadow(Pre-K and K) for DS(4 in Dec) and DD(5), but we're open to looking into either Christopherus or Little Acorn if OM turns out not to be the best fit. I would say our biggest challenge so far is finances, we're in a pretty good financial position but buying all organic/wood/natural stuff as well as new curricula is certainly not cheap. My biggest inspireations are The Parenting Passageway blog, I'm so in love with Carrie, and my DD as she LOVES every aspect of Waldorf it is a really good fit for her.

post #393 of 397


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nursingnaturalmom View Post

Anyone have a nice verse for after main lesson or any other transition time in your waldorf homeschool?
Circle time to start our day, but I thought having a verse for each transition might be nice too and then a nice one to end our day

Chandi


 

I just received a copy of seven times the sun and it is filled with all those potential verses for transitions.

post #394 of 397

Hi I'm new to this board and going to be new o homeschooling as soon as I figure out what I am doing.  I have visited heWaldorf school that is with in driving distance and love the feel there.  I like what I see the students doing and think it fits my DD (9) very well.  I've done a lot of research of waldorf curriculum and here are my concerns:

 

1.) I can't touch them and leaf through them before I make a decision 

      I want to compare and contrast, read the lessons for myself, and feel the books

 

2.) Wondering how much of Steiners anthroposophy is weaved through the different curriculums and how I can or can't leave that out of my homeschooling without taking away the integrity of the curriculum.

 

Any words of wisdom?

 

-April

post #395 of 397

Hi!  I understand your frustration, not being able to thumb through the curriculum before buying.  Which ones are you looking at?

 

We are going to be using Oak Meadow next year, which is considered 'Waldorf inspired'.  From what I've been able to look at on their website, it seems lighter on the spiritual/ anthroposophy stuff vs. Christopherus ( a true Waldorf curriculum).  

 

Christopherus is more true I think to Steiner's philosophy, and the presence of Steiner and anthroposophy in the curriculum is very discernible to me.  (in presentation, activities, etc.) However, I've heard that Christopherus is kind of 'open-ended', in that they give you an outline of subjects and suggestions, but it is up to you how you implement them-  So I see no reason why you couldn't tweak it to your liking.  Disclaimer-  I haven't used Christopherus so I can't testify to this from experience-  but I have done a lot of research and comparisons between Oak Meadow and Christopherus and this is what I have heard and seen in forums and discussions.

 

I think both are good curriculums (based on what I've seen on their websites and in my research) for Waldorf families, or for those who like the Waldorf pedagogy.  

 

I guess I still feel like I haven't answered your question though.  What parts of anthroposophy are you uncomfortable with (if any?).  The curriculums do not preach or attempt to indoctrinate students into anthroposophy, if that is what you are asking.  Just like as in a waldorf school (where my children are currently), anthroposophy is not brought to the children, or taught, but it does influence the curriculum and the teachers interactions with their students.  My oldest is a seventh grader, and if you were to ask her what anthroposophy was, she would have no idea what you are talking about, even though it's influence is present all around her-  from the color of her classroom, her interactions with her teacher, and with the intention and careful structure of her lessons. Does that make sense?

post #396 of 397

Can this be converted to a group so you don't have to read through all 20 pages or re-ask an old question please! :-) I would also love to see a "book list" for toddlers (because I have a toddler), activity recommendations for daily activities, etc! But this is a lot to read through :-D

 

BTW have my "Celebrating Irish Festivals: Calendar of Seasonal Celebrations" on the way and just got Earthways. Read "Heaven on Earth" when my son was wee and "You are your childs first teacher" recently. Love this stuff. Just would love to ask some specific questions.

post #397 of 397

When I was choosing resources for my daughter's 1st grade Waldorf year, I bought several different sets of stuff used through the Waldorf yahoo group that sells lots of used Waldorf resources.  I looked at everything in person, devouring it, and then resold what I didn't want.  On what I resold, I only lost the cost of shipping!  I highly recommend spending time now to buy resources of interest, look them over and then plan for the new year.  You really do have to see stuff in person to decide!

 

That said, we used Enki for K and 1st grade.  For 2nd grade we are doing a more eclectic style year, rather than Waldorf-oriented.  I love the foundation that Waldorf gave her for imagination, love of language and understanding of math concepts.  But, now that she is older I find it easier to implement other education styles.  That said, my younger son is going to do the same Waldorf 1st grade that my daughter did a few years ago.  I don't want to change a thing!
 

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