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Neighbor's Drifting Pot Smoke - Page 5

post #81 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by NiteNicole View Post
You shouldn't have to live with the smell of someone else's habit. And you, your children, and your things shouldn't have to carry the smell . Talk to the neighbor one more time and then call the landlord every time. Threaten to break your lease if he (or she, whoever owns the apartments) doesn't enforce the no smoking rules.
I'm with her on this one.

That said, if you live in an apartment, people smoke. That's pretty normal. Does it suck? Yes. Is there really anything you can do to stop people from smoking (anything) in their apartment? Not really. I'd have more of a problem with my neighbors smoking cigarettes (because they tend to smoke a lot more of them and the smell is awful, in my opinion) and the smell seeping through. Also, cigarettes tend to leave a stink behind that weed doesn't.

And I'm totally lol'ing at the posters who think you should call the police, do not pass go. Really now? I use marijuana (even during pregnancy! *gasp* to keep my blood pressure low and help me sleep. So I'm trying to think what I would do if my neighbors came to me and said they could smell it and could I stop. I would do it outside instead. But realistically, if you asked they won't alter their habits, I would tell the landlord you will break the lease and see them in court if they don't stop it. If it's a smoking apartment, however, I would just deal with it, put up my own fans, and be glad my neighbors weren't chain smoking Marlboros next door. That stuff stinks!

As a side note...

"Then I would ask to see the renter's medical marijuana license. If he's legitimate, then work with him to reduce his impact on others who do not wish to breathe in his mind-altering fumes.

If he does not have a legal permit, I don't see how it is ethical to not turn him in for committing a crime. While I am sure some pot-heads are nice people too, if something's illegal, it's illegal. It's really very black & white.

Would it be any different if the person were smoking crack cocaine or heroin? They're all illegal."


Um... wow! Do you always let the government make your ethical decisions or do you ever stop to consider the issues for yourself? It's hardly black and white when it comes to law. It's pretty unfair to compare a marijuana smoker to crack head, don't you think? Clearly you've never smoked marijuana before!
post #82 of 175
I have to say, I'm astonished to see these "MJ is evil" posts on MDC. Having seen thousands, literally, of people through the ER on a variety of drugs, drunk, chronic users of a variety of drugs/alcohol/tobacco, I can say that the users of plain marijuana have not been any problem to us, nor have they had any particular increased rate of medical problems.

(The exception would be people who smoke "wet" - that stuff screws with the brain bigtime, but it's the PCP/formaldehyde/whatever component, not the MJ.)

I've restrained more combative drunks than I can count, dealt with overdoses of all of the different opiates (heroin, oxycodone, etc), sent people to coronary cath lab for cocaine-induced myocardial infarction, treated hundreds of skin poppers/meth mouths and dealt with people with tobacco-induced lung disease daily, but have never seen any illness or detrimental behavior that could be attributed to MJ use. And I've never used the stuff - not my thing - but it's not evil, and isn't worthy of a police call imho.

To the OP, the electric/fresh combination does make me think he's growing. I hope that you can get him to quit stinking up your house somehow or other. That would bother me.
post #83 of 175
I don't have a problem w/ mj, but selling/intent to sell is a lot different than some guy smoking on his couch. I wouldn't want to be in the neighborhood when the water and power gets cut off and they break down the door and tear his apt apart. Rightly or wrongly, the US has very harsh penalties for selling drugs and WTH wants to deal w/ that? (No pun intended!)
post #84 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by KweenKrunch View Post
Then I would ask to see the renter's medical marijuana license. If he's legitimate, then work with him to reduce his impact on others who do not wish to breathe in his mind-altering fumes.

If he does not have a legal permit, I don't see how it is ethical to not turn him in for committing a crime. While I am sure some pot-heads are nice people too, if something's illegal, it's illegal. It's really very black & white.

Would it be any different if the person were smoking crack cocaine or heroin? They're all illegal.
scary. really? Really?!?!

It's not black & white and it's scary to me that people think like that. And comparing MJ to dangerous, deadly, highly addictive drugs is just nuts.
post #85 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drummer's Wife View Post
scary. really? Really?!?!

It's not black & white and it's scary to me that people think like that. And comparing MJ to dangerous, deadly, highly addictive drugs is just nuts.
I'm not the poster you quoted so I'm not sure of her intent, but I assume she means it's black in white in that it IS illegal, and the police don't care if it's not as bad/dangerous/unhealthy/addictive as other drugs--they're going to arrest him whether it's crack or mj, that's their job, and it's going to be a very unpleasant experience for him and if he's selling, his landlord. The police aren't going to ignore this guy b/c mj isn't a serious drug.

Or maybe she thinks mj is evil. Who am I to say?
post #86 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by beesknees View Post

I must say the baking suggestion did give me an idea. I will give him my best brownie recipe and suggest a smokeless mode of ingestion!
That's a good idea.

The problem is, just like with alcohol, some people are addicted to pot. Though most can do it more or less rationally, and in a limited way, not everyone can. So there's a chance that this could just keep going on, "Could you... " "Oh, wow, sorry, yeah..." "Okay, we talked about this, could you..." "I'm SO sorry, totally forgot..." etc.

Growing pot is a fire hazard. I have a burned-down pot "factory" within my sights. I would absolutely report that. It is SO unsafe to do that kind of stuff in a duplex / apartment building. I mean if you really have reason to believe he's growing. It's like leaving ten space heaters on all the time.

This is a tough situation because like many others, I would not want to get someone arrested for something that I think should not be illegal (smoking pot). On the other hand, I do not want my children exposed. I sympathise!
post #87 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbymom05 View Post
I'm not the poster you quoted so I'm not sure of her intent, but I assume she means it's black in white in that it IS illegal, and the police don't care if it's not as bad/dangerous/unhealthy/addictive as other drugs--they're going to arrest him whether it's crack or mj, that's their job, and it's going to be a very unpleasant experience for him and if he's selling, his landlord. The police aren't going to ignore this guy b/c mj isn't a serious drug.

Or maybe she thinks mj is evil. Who am I to say?
Well, depending on the state, even the legality is not so B&W. Anyway, growing and/or dealing are a bit different. I still wouldn't call the cops unless I honestly feared for my family's safety - but I understand that others aren't that tolerant. But if he's just a recreational or medicinal smoker? He's not going to get arrested, unless he has large quantities or is definitely selling it. It's unlikely the police would even come out for a visit, and if they did, chances are he would get a warning, or maybe a fine. IME (and I no longer partake), they very well may ignore this guy, since he's only smoking pot, not running a meth lab.
post #88 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drummer's Wife View Post
scary. really? Really?!?!

It's not black & white and it's scary to me that people think like that. And comparing MJ to dangerous, deadly, highly addictive drugs is just nuts.
What's scary to me is that there are people in this country who don't think the laws they disagree with should apply to them.

Drummer's Wife - it is VERY black and white. It's illegal. Bottom line.

If I saw someone stealing a car or carrying a gun into a bank, I'd call the police. I don't see how anyone can justify turning a blind eye to *some* illegal activities and not to others. The law is the law, like it or not. Good citizens follow the rules.
post #89 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drummer's Wife View Post
Well, depending on the state, even the legality is not so B&W. Anyway, growing and/or dealing are a bit different. I still wouldn't call the cops unless I honestly feared for my family's safety - but I understand that others aren't that tolerant. But if he's just a recreational or medicinal smoker? He's not going to get arrested, unless he has large quantities or is definitely selling it. It's unlikely the police would even come out for a visit, and if they did, chances are he would get a warning, or maybe a fine. IME (and I no longer partake), they very well may ignore this guy, since he's only smoking pot, not running a meth lab.
It sounds like he's growing it. If it sounds like that to me, won't it sound like that to law enforcement? They don't know what it is--harmless mellow smoker dude w/ a grow light or crazy meth lab militia member. They'll assume the worst for their own safety and let the courts work it out. Personally, I wouldn't call the police either, but I'd be worried and would def tell my landlord. In fact, I'm such a worrier that I'd send a certified letter and let it be on her head, b/c really, IMO that's who should be dealing with it.

But maybe I didn't read the whole thread. I'm not talking about the smoke--I think she should nicely confront him about that in addition to the landlord--I'm talking about the "fresh" smell and the upcoming energy audit. If it's just smoke, I agree, hopefully the police have better things to do.
post #90 of 175
"Good citizens follow the rules."

oh! Is that what makes a citizen good? I live in a place where it is Decriminalized and you won't get in any trouble for having it. TONS of people grow Legally and sell it to Legally to MJ card holders. There is nothing black and white about it... or very many other things for that matter.

op- i would be super upset about audit for the electricity bills... maybe you should bring it up to him...and if he has been stealing your power...doesn't he owe you some MONEY?! So sorry your having to put up with this. Hope there is resolve soon.
post #91 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by KweenKrunch View Post
What's scary to me is that there are people in this country who don't think the laws they disagree with should apply to them.
I didn't want to get into the OT part of this thread, but I cannot keep silent on this.

This country was founded by people who thought the laws they disagreed with should not apply to them. There are many ways to resist bad laws, one of which is civil disobedience.

There are a lot of bad laws in this country. There are laws against public nudity that prohibit mothers from breastfeeding. There are laws against sodomy that tell couples - hetero, homo and other - what they can and cannot do in their own bedrooms. There are laws mandating vaccinations, and some states do not offer accessible exemptions. My mom could have been jailed for neglect by breaking the law when she homeschooled me in California.

There are two types of laws: malum prohibitum and malum in se. Malum prohibitum laws are those which are "bad because they are." These are laws against things like murder or theft. Things people inherently know are wrong. Malum in se laws are "bad because we said so." These are laws about how tall your backyard fence can be, or how late teenagers can be out unsupervised, or whether or not somebody can smoke weed in the privacy of their own home. The first type of laws are generally connected to morals; the latter are generally connected to statute. (It is immoral for me to steal from my neighbor. It is against the rules to erect a fence taller than 6'.)

Furthermore, there is a strong tradition in law called "jury nullification." Essentially, jurors have the right to decide not only if a defendant is guilty or not guilty based on what they did, but also if the law itself is bad. In other words, you might be guilty of breaking the law, but found not guilty because the jury "nullifies" a bad law. The word of the law is not and should not be the end-all, be-all ethical authority.

I want you to really consider the full scope of the laws in this country, past and present, before you advocate following each and every one of them. Think about the laws that have applied to women or to minorities. I find it impossible to believe there is not a single law you disobey or disregard because you find it improper.
post #92 of 175
Wow, laurelg. What an awesome reply. I loved reading that.
post #93 of 175
: ditto! me too! well put!
post #94 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurelg View Post
I didn't want to get into the OT part of this thread, but I cannot keep silent on this.

This country was founded by people who thought the laws they disagreed with should not apply to them. There are many ways to resist bad laws, one of which is civil disobedience.

There are a lot of bad laws in this country. There are laws against public nudity that prohibit mothers from breastfeeding. There are laws against sodomy that tell couples - hetero, homo and other - what they can and cannot do in their own bedrooms. There are laws mandating vaccinations, and some states do not offer accessible exemptions. My mom could have been jailed for neglect by breaking the law when she homeschooled me in California.

There are two types of laws: malum prohibitum and malum in se. Malum prohibitum laws are those which are "bad because they are." These are laws against things like murder or theft. Things people inherently know are wrong. Malum in se laws are "bad because we said so." These are laws about how tall your backyard fence can be, or how late teenagers can be out unsupervised, or whether or not somebody can smoke weed in the privacy of their own home. The first type of laws are generally connected to morals; the latter are generally connected to statute. (It is immoral for me to steal from my neighbor. It is against the rules to erect a fence taller than 6'.)

Furthermore, there is a strong tradition in law called "jury nullification." Essentially, jurors have the right to decide not only if a defendant is guilty or not guilty based on what they did, but also if the law itself is bad. In other words, you might be guilty of breaking the law, but found not guilty because the jury "nullifies" a bad law. The word of the law is not and should not be the end-all, be-all ethical authority.

I want you to really consider the full scope of the laws in this country, past and present, before you advocate following each and every one of them. Think about the laws that have applied to women or to minorities. I find it impossible to believe there is not a single law you disobey or disregard because you find it improper.
post #95 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by beesknees View Post
Hmmm.... We are just about to have an energy audit because we have a ridiculously high utility bill and can't figure out why....Yes, there is a basement, and that is where the smell is concentrated. And there are two different kind of smells- one smokish and one a little "fresher" if you know what I mean.

So, I will definitely be looking further into the electricity matter!!

So thank you everyone for the input, opinions, and advice.

I decided to talk to the landlord. She is pretty laid back and not someone who is going to call the cops so I thought to try again with her, rather than him. She told me she would talk to him. Her solution- " He can smoke that sh*t outside." I feel like that is a reasonable solution, as that is the smoking policy. And if it continues, he moves.

We shall see.....
Awesome! Good luck with everything!

Quote:
Originally Posted by D'sMama View Post
I had a neighbor who smoked pot, while I was living in a big apartment building and pregnant. The way the air traveled sucked the smoke right out of his apartment, down the hall and into mine.

All I had to do was knock on his door while I knew he was smoking or had recently and therefore was high - I just stood there with my huge pregnant belly in his face, smiled real big and said cheerfully "Hi, are you smoking pot?" He gives me a blank, stoned look and says "Uh, no." I said (still smiling real big and rubbing my belly) "Okay, well when you do, can you put a towel under your door and turn on a fan so the smoke doesn't come into my apartment? Thanks!" Problem solved. I probably would have given it three requests before calling the super, but I didn't need to. I NEVER would have called the police.
See, I would have as a last resort. My husband's job requires random drug testing, and a neighbor's smoke could cause a second-hand positive drug test. It would also give me some good back up documentation if a job issue every arose.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KweenKrunch View Post
What's scary to me is that there are people in this country who don't think the laws they disagree with should apply to them.

Drummer's Wife - it is VERY black and white. It's illegal. Bottom line.

If I saw someone stealing a car or carrying a gun into a bank, I'd call the police. I don't see how anyone can justify turning a blind eye to *some* illegal activities and not to others. The law is the law, like it or not. Good citizens follow the rules.
I agree. And laurelg, let her neighbor do his bit to change the laws. I am sure he is aware of the consequences to his actions, so he can deal with the law from his own end and go from there. The OP, in the meantime, does not nor should not have to be inconvenienced while he strives for change.
post #96 of 175
If you don't agree with the laws, work to change them. Ignoring them isn't some noble act or following the path of our Founding Fathers, it's breaking the law that you as a citizen have agreed to live with and support, pure and simple. It's a social contract and things go smoothly when we abide by it, including using the channels available to us for change. Why is being a good citizen something to sneer at?

And btw, if comparing mj to heroin is hyperbole, what the heck is comparing some stoner who's stealing the OP's power and endangering her via second hand smoke and possible criminal prosecution to Thomas Jefferson??? The Founding Fathers were working for what they saw as the good of the many, not some fool sitting alone trying to catch a buzz, uncaring about the repercussions of his actions.
post #97 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbymom05 View Post
If you don't agree with the laws, work to change them. Ignoring them isn't some noble act or following the path of our Founding Fathers, it's breaking the law that you as a citizen have agreed to live with and support, pure and simple. It's a social contract and things go smoothly when we abide by it, including using the channels available to us for change. Why is being a good citizen something to sneer at?

And btw, if comparing mj to heroin is hyperbole, what the heck is comparing some stoner who's stealing the OP's power and endangering her via second hand smoke and possible criminal prosecution to Thomas Jefferson??? The Founding Fathers were working for what they saw as the good of the many, not some fool sitting alone trying to catch a buzz, uncaring about the repercussions of his actions.
post #98 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdnaMarie View Post
Growing pot is a fire hazard. I have a burned-down pot "factory" within my sights. I would absolutely report that.
hum.... maybe.. I had a near scare with a crop of broccoli. My cat decided the top of the grow lights were where she wanted to lay and keep warm. I didn't find this out until a furball that had fallen into the housing caught fire!

so again, not the pot, the lights.

laurelg amazing post! ITA.
post #99 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by KweenKrunch View Post
What's scary to me is that there are people in this country who don't think the laws they disagree with should apply to them.

Drummer's Wife - it is VERY black and white. It's illegal. Bottom line.

If I saw someone stealing a car or carrying a gun into a bank, I'd call the police. I don't see how anyone can justify turning a blind eye to *some* illegal activities and not to others. The law is the law, like it or not. Good citizens follow the rules.
This is really scary. We MUST be living in different worlds.

Jaywalking is illegal, too. Do you call the police when you see that happening? I saw a man race across the street to keep a kid on his bike from going into the street. I suppose he should pay the fine, though - because he's not supposed to jaywalk.

What about parking in front of a fire hydrant? That's illegal, too. I saw a woman once park at the hospital in front of a fire hydrant, leave her car running. I don't know why - maybe her child was just brought in from camp after having a seizure. Maybe her husband was just in a horrible car accident. I didn't call the police. One of our nurses actually went out, moved the car, and found the woman to give her her car keys back.

Does it make these people "bad citizens"? Hardly.

In REAL LIFE, there is NO such thing as "black and white." There's no way for us to know the whole story, so there's no way for us to be able to say something so concretely.

laurelg, very well put. Civil disobedience is a foundation of this country - and an honorable one.

I agree that she shouldn't be inconvenienced in the meantime. That's why we're coming up with REAL solutions to get rid of the smell - because unless he's a MAJOR grower, the cops have bigger fish to fry, I think.
post #100 of 175
Actually, Thomas Jefferson grew pot.
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