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$200 alloted for school supplies - Page 2

post #21 of 122
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlygirls View Post
I think food stamps should work like WIC where you can only buy certain things. If you don't like it, you can always decline to use the program. There was a woman in our clinic who walked out for that very reason. She wanted to buy whatever she wanted on WIC and when the program was explained to her, she left. .
The food stamp portion does work that way. You can't buy prepared stuff, like Deli type foods, and you can't get alcohol or cigarettes. You also can't get vitamins.

However, this $200 goes on the cash account side of the card...that side can be used for anything.
post #22 of 122
I know that's how food stamps work but I still think it would be better if there were only certain foods you could buy. I like the model of the WIC program.
post #23 of 122
Actually I read on here that you can get cold deli foods like sandwiches. There is also a Papa Murphy's chain that sells pizza. You take it home and bake it. They accept EBT.

But this thread is about school supplies. I hope that the parents are able to use a majority of the money to go to school supplies. There are so many sales right now. I am stocking up for the whole year.

Last weekend I bought 3 spiral notebooks, 3 packs of 20 count crayons and 30 pencils for $1.01
post #24 of 122
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlygirls View Post
I know that's how food stamps work but I still think it would be better if there were only certain foods you could buy. I like the model of the WIC program.
See I get both, and I think it's very sad about WIC. We are a vegetarian family and we will not risk our health by eating non-organic dairy or eggs. WIC doesn't give you choices that way, so we have to reject all dairy and eggs. I think they should give us more choices.
post #25 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlygirls View Post
Actually I read on here that you can get cold deli foods like sandwiches. There is also a Papa Murphy's chain that sells pizza. You take it home and bake it. They accept EBT.

But this thread is about school supplies. I hope that the parents are able to use a majority of the money to go to school supplies. There are so many sales right now. I am stocking up for the whole year.

Last weekend I bought 3 spiral notebooks, 3 packs of 20 count crayons and 30 pencils for $1.01
You know, I'm kind of surprised that this forum doesn't have a school supplies deal thread. I've spent less than $20 getting my school supplies this year for three kiddos (aside from clothes, I spent $40 on clothes). We got some great deals on notebooks this week too at Staples, took my girls with me, each of us bought 6 notebooks. So, we got 18 notebooks for 18 cents!!!! The funny thing was, they were more thrilled than anything that they sold pink notebooks!

I know, if I had $200 per kid (it would be $600 for us here) I would seriously use only a fraction of it for school supplies because I'm such a good shopper LOL.
post #26 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlygirls View Post
I don't think that the majority of parents would abuse the money. However, if you are already struggling and need car repairs, emergency dental care, a home repair, the list is endless....you will probably not spend that money on school supplies.
So what is better for the kids in that family, do you think? To have a working vehicle, a mama not in pain, a home with heat in the winter... or that Hello Kitty backpack?

Quote:
Originally Posted by vbactivist View Post
this. And for people saying those receiving funds should be able to use said funds as they see fit - do you think they should be able to use it for cigarettes or alcohol? I don't. I think when money it should be expected that there might be some stipulations to the money.
I'm glad that George Soros - the guy who gave people 35 million of the money - didn't feel that way. And he stated pretty directly that he didn't - that's not how he was treated when he was struggling, and that's not how he wanted to treat others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by phatchristy View Post
I know, if I had $200 per kid (it would be $600 for us here) I would seriously use only a fraction of it for school supplies because I'm such a good shopper LOL.
You also probably have access to a working vehicle or at least good public transportation, and live in an area with big chain stores that do sell stuff at such good prices. Poor people often have to spend more money to buy the same things because they're poor....
post #27 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlygirls View Post
I think food stamps should work like WIC where you can only buy certain things. If you don't like it, you can always decline to use the program. There was a woman in our clinic who walked out for that very reason. She wanted to buy whatever she wanted on WIC and when the program was explained to her, she left.

I disagree with this also, as of Oct 1st in WA we will no longer be able to get organic milk in our state, we were possibly one of the only states who had that option. Part of my FS money is going to go directly to buying a case of organic milk a month. I am happy for someof the changes that are happening, we'll get tofu, brown rice, veggies and possibly soy milk. I mean I haven't been getting half of my stuff I don't need 50 cans of juice or 20 boxes of Life cereal, but that's what WIC gives me. I'd rather just have my OG milk.

There are rules and regs on what you can and cannot get, I mean I don't agree that you can buy Red Bull on FS(gross), but that doesn't mean I think that nobody should be able to. For me my buying a family pack of steaks is great and when they are 2.98 a lb I can stretch that into 2-3 meals, which is what I did the other day at my local store. I go to Walmart, which I can't stand really, but when I am trying to stretch my FS budget on pantry items and using my coupons it's where I go. My local store is nearly 2xs as much on many of the items I just bought the other day, did I buy a bunch of crap, well some may think so. Coffee, granola bars, organic granola, cookies for DH's lunch. I guess I just think that it would be unfair to place you can only buy X items-what would they be? You can buy this item organic, but not this-like WIC.
post #28 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dar View Post
So what is better for the kids in that family, do you think? To have a working vehicle, a mama not in pain, a home with heat in the winter... or that Hello Kitty backpack?


I'm glad that George Soros - the guy who gave people 35 million of the money - didn't feel that way. And he stated pretty directly that he didn't - that's not how he was treated when he was struggling, and that's not how he wanted to treat others.


You also probably have access to a working vehicle or at least good public transportation, and live in an area with big chain stores that do sell stuff at such good prices. Poor people often have to spend more money to buy the same things because they're poor....
Dar, I am wondering, though, do you think it would be okay for parents to spend the money on cigarettes and alcohol? I truly am curious if there is any line you would draw.
post #29 of 122
I think poor people should be able to spend their money on the same things not poor people spend their money on... and I can buy beer with my money.

If kids are suffering because of their parents' decisions, that's a separate issue, but I don't think it's right to assume that because parents are poor, they're not capable of making the decisions that are best for their children and families.
post #30 of 122
Quote:
I think poor people should be able to spend their money on the same things not poor people spend their money on
Just to clarify, are you including monies given to people on aid (WIC, food stamps, cash assistance) as "their" money, or just the income that people earn at a specific job?
post #31 of 122
Quote:
I guess I just think that it would be unfair to place you can only buy X items-what would they be? You can buy this item organic, but not this-like WIC.
I can see both sides. Because of the cost difference, families can buy less organic than "regular" food with the same amount of money. If the whole point of gov't assistance for food is to help people stretch their food dollars, then it makes sense to exclude stuff like organic milk, for example, because you can buy regular milk PLUS other healthy foods in addition. If you're buying organic, you can get the milk and that's all for the same amt. of $$.

Sure, organic is healthier, but when you have to decide how best to spend a limited amt. of money, it makes more financial sense to buy regular and be able to buy more (not talking about cheap $1 bags of generic Cheetos vs. fresh fruit- talking about organic vs. regular stuff) healthy food overall.
post #32 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dar View Post
I think poor people should be able to spend their money on the same things not poor people spend their money on... and I can buy beer with my money.

If kids are suffering because of their parents' decisions, that's a separate issue, but I don't think it's right to assume that because parents are poor, they're not capable of making the decisions that are best for their children and families.
I am not saying this is ALWAYS the case, but isn't it possible that some poor people AREN'T capable of making good money choices, ie. making bad choices with finances is what got them where they needed assistance? I would like to see at the very minimum budgeting classes for folks receiving assistance. So that they DON'T spend their money on beer rather than food for their kids.
post #33 of 122
My point was that if people have other needs, the money will be spent elsewhere and then someone will still have to help with school supplies.

Where does it end? Free food, medical care, school supplies. All that is stuff that we pay for every month. I understand that many people are in need right now, but if they get money alloted for school supplies, that is where it should go.
post #34 of 122
Quote:
I am not saying this is ALWAYS the case, but isn't it possible that some poor people AREN'T capable of making good money choices, ie. making bad choices with finances is what got them where they needed assistance? I would like to see at the very minimum budgeting classes for folks receiving assistance. So that they DON'T spend their money on beer rather than food for their kids.
Quote:
My point was that if people have other needs, the money will be spent elsewhere and then someone will still have to help with school supplies.

Where does it end? Free food, medical care, school supplies. All that is stuff that we pay for every month. I understand that many people are in need right now, but if they get money alloted for school supplies, that is where it should go.
:
post #35 of 122
What a great gift for NY'ers on assistance! We don't live in NY (next door in VT actually), and DS is only 2, but maybe there will be a program like this next year. I think it is great that there are no stipulations on it as well.

While I do see the argument for using vouchers and putting stipulations on what the money can and can't be used for, doing so is really just another way of making the people who receive benefits feel "less" than everyone else. It makes us feel as though simply because we receive benefits, we do not know what is good for us and how to make sound financial decisions. Granted, there are people who receive benefits who are not able to manage their money, but there are also people who make enough to not qualify for benefits who are wasting WAY more money as well. I have a friend of a friend who makes plenty, but cannot afford childcare for her kids. She absolutely makes enough to pay for it, but she chooses to spend her money on things that she feels her family needs like Cheetos and piles of plastic toys. There is noone hovering over her head telling her to stop wasting her money and buy her children the things they need, like decent care, but she is above the poverty line, so she has that privilege.

Every single little bit of hovering that the public assistance programs do to those of us who use it de-humanizes us a bit more. It is so unfortunate that these restrictions need to exist at all. I completely understand why they are there, but really, a gift is a gift, and this gift of money for school supplies with its added gift of responsibility on the part of the parents is wonderful.
post #36 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayleeZoo View Post
I can see both sides. Because of the cost difference, families can buy less organic than "regular" food with the same amount of money. If the whole point of gov't assistance for food is to help people stretch their food dollars, then it makes sense to exclude stuff like organic milk, for example, because you can buy regular milk PLUS other healthy foods in addition. If you're buying organic, you can get the milk and that's all for the same amt. of $$.

Sure, organic is healthier, but when you have to decide how best to spend a limited amt. of money, it makes more financial sense to buy regular and be able to buy more (not talking about cheap $1 bags of generic Cheetos vs. fresh fruit- talking about organic vs. regular stuff) healthy food overall.
I guess that depends on who you are talking about. For myself I can make getting organic items just as cheap as non-organic or within a small margin of cost. I have a freezer full of organic milk that I got for a couple bucks a half gallon(on sale with coupons). I stretch my dollars and buy the best food that I can with sales and coupons. That's how I do it, I just started getting this assistance due to the crappy economy, but I already shopped like that because that's how I am. I mean I also have a whole bunch of non-og stuff too, you have to find places to pick and choose. There are people who are going to buy all conventional, processed stuff and not get nearly what I can for the same amount because of how and what they are purchasing. Plus there already are stipulations in place for what you can and can't get, just many of them are pretty silly.
post #37 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dar View Post
I think poor people should be able to spend their money on the same things not poor people spend their money on... and I can buy beer with my money.

If kids are suffering because of their parents' decisions, that's a separate issue, but I don't think it's right to assume that because parents are poor, they're not capable of making the decisions that are best for their children and families.
I agree, I hate the assumption some people make that being poor means that your also unintelligent and immoral. I think that this is a great program. My dh grew up very poor and it is heartbreaking for a little kid to have to go to school on the first day feeling bad because everyone else has new shoes and backpacks and you don't.
post #38 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayleeZoo View Post
Just to clarify, are you including monies given to people on aid (WIC, food stamps, cash assistance) as "their" money, or just the income that people earn at a specific job?
Both. When we give something to someone, don't we usually consider it his?

Quote:
Originally Posted by vbactivist View Post
I am not saying this is ALWAYS the case, but isn't it possible that some poor people AREN'T capable of making good money choices, ie. making bad choices with finances is what got them where they needed assistance? I would like to see at the very minimum budgeting classes for folks receiving assistance. So that they DON'T spend their money on beer rather than food for their kids.
Some not-poor people aren't capable of making good money choices either. The recent economy woes have made that very clear. The government has created a lot of programs to help them, but AFAIK budgeting classes haven't been part of that. Of course, not all people who have gotten into dire financial straits are there because they've made poor financial choices... but then, that's my point, whether those people are poor or not.

FWIW, I think offering budgeting classes to those who want them is a great thing... I'm just not into assuming that poor people need them. It's kind of like assuming that all people on WIC need classes on nutrition... some do, but for a lot of us it was a huge waste of time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pumpkin_Pie View Post
Every single little bit of hovering that the public assistance programs do to those of us who use it de-humanizes us a bit more. It is so unfortunate that these restrictions need to exist at all. I completely understand why they are there, but really, a gift is a gift, and this gift of money for school supplies with its added gift of responsibility on the part of the parents is wonderful.

Dar
post #39 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by choli View Post
It's funny how this is always the first conclusion that people leap to - rather like people spending food stamps on steak and selling the food stamps for liquor.
What exactly is wrong with steak? I get food stamps and I am able to get almost all organic food, including a bit of steak, chicken, and wild pacific salmon each month. We eat very very well and are able to build up a food supply as well as buy organic seeds for our garden which is producing wonderfully. I also often am able to help friends out with food. I know one is not "supposed to" do that, but I can't stand having more than I need and watching people I care about have to feed their child off brand mac and cheese 3 times a day because they just can't afford much else. What am I supposed to buy processed crap? Should I only be allowed non-organic foods because I Am poor? Really people. Also, should poor people never consume alcohol? It's one thing to overdo it, but seriously. Poor people are people too.
post #40 of 122
We are getting assistance right now not because we don't know how to budget, but because our income has dropped by at least a third due to the sucky economy, which literally translates into about 800-1000 a month. I really wish there were something else we could do, I don't especially like getting FS, it was a big decision for me to even do it. My Dh and I have paid for years into the system and now we are having to get something back. I know there are many others out there right now who are having to do the same things.

Currently I am trying do as much as I can to just stay ahead, which meant applying for assistance, applying for a mortgage modification and slashing anything really unnecessary. At least my DH does have some kind of job though, because many people around here have nothing.
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