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Do you want a nurse in your home? - Page 3

post #41 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mountaingirl79 View Post
Well, I haven't read all the other replies, but I do know that if you are on WIC and medicaid a nurse will come to your house shortly after you give birth.

The way, I see it, poor people have been dealing with this for years. Free healthcare isnt a new option for the people, like myself, who have had to grit their teeth and go the the health dept or free clinic to get medical attention.
This is not a requirement though. I was on Medcaid and WIC, and I was offered a "first steps" nurse, but declined because I had my midwife visiting regularly after birth. I don't know if it is required if you have a hospital birth or not, I think they may push it a bit more, but I had the choice.
post #42 of 68
When DS was born he was tiny, had low blood sugar from my gestational diabetes, and a horrible latch. Due to his low weight, he needed to be weighed very frequently. It was the middle of winter, and I had to bundle him up everyday and take him to one appointment after another. There was visiting the LC, his ped, my OB/GYN and endochronologist, the lab to take blood (that was especially annoying since the Dr sent us to a lad that didn't take our insurance so we had to take him to a second one,) back to the hospital to deal with his birth certificate, to an ENT Dr to have his tongue tie fixed, etc, etc. We were driving all over the place with a baby less than a week old.

I realize that a visiting nurse wouldn't have been able to eliminate every single one of these places I needed to go with DS, but one probably could have covered most of these needs. If she was a certifed LC, that would a couple of trips eliminated. If she took blood samples, that would be 2 more trips eliminated. If she could check me so I didn't need to see my OB, another 2 trips eliminated. If she could have checked his weight that would have eliminated at least a half a dozen visits.
post #43 of 68
I live in BC where it's normal for a health nurse to come visit, but I had no problems opting out. A health nurse called and asked me how I was doing, and whether I needed any help. She seemed surprised that I didn't need her, but was supportive and understood I had a midwife I could call if needed and I didn't hear from her again. No vax talk, no pressure. (at least, that's how I remember it almost 4 years later )

So if the proposed program turns out like ours, I think it will be fairly easy to avoid the visits, but your experience will vary depending on the specific nurses you are working with.
post #44 of 68
I don't see why the hostility. I guess that most mothers on MDC are well informed, have done their research and know exactly what they want and how they are going to handle their newborns and therefore don't need any outside assistance. But look around you ladies, at the much vaster world of un-informed or perhaps ill-informed mothers, the sick, the depressed, the reluctant, the overwhelmed .... how much could this mean, what a help this could be - it could literally save lives, probably improve many a childs early life.
post #45 of 68
I was in the hospital for 6 days after my first, DS's C-section. They wrote on my chart I was a candidate for PPD (actually I had PTSD - caused by the hospital). A nurse was supposed to come a week later, but I think got the heads up and came after 3 days. Our personalities did not mix well, but she was supportive without being intrusive, just did weighing, ask about bf, nothing about vax. She came regularly (maybe 8 times?) in his first 6 months. I thought it was very helpful.

I was in the hospital 4 days after DDs homebirth turned c-section. No PTSD. The nurse came a few weeks later and maybe 3 times total. It was enough. I was an experienced, confident mother at that point and didn't need anything more. But I am glad the options were there, and they took care with my first, when I did need it.
post #46 of 68
In the UK a community midwife visits all mums for 10 days post partum.

They check on the babe to make sure their umbilicus is healthy looking, that you are well if you have stitches or an incision wound. They weigh the LO and help with feeding.

They just pop in for as long as you want them for each day so that you aren't checked out of hospital and abandoned to your fate.

A friend of mine was glad of the midwife who insisted on having a look at her stitches when my friend looked unwell and a bit feverish when she visited. Her stitches were infected and she got that fixes quickly. If she had been home alone with no visit she would have let that go on for longer and the problem would have got much worse.

All sorts of things can happen post partum and if you aren't online or have friends to ask or others to support you it is a difficult time to be alone. Lots of people don't know that falling to pieces on days 3 and 4 and weeping is absolutely normal and will pass. A midwife can reassure you that it is and it doesn't mean you are a bad mum.

You can ask them about any problems you are having or anything you aren't sure about. In most places you will have met the community midwifery team during your pregnancy and may even have birthed with one of them so having them come to see you post partum is a continuation of the same care.

I didn't need help from them by the time I had my third but they came to see dd as I had had a difficult labour and they wanted to see how we were - and snuggle her to welcome her! With my fourth they came for the same reason and to watch us EC
post #47 of 68
Assuming the nurse is someone specially trained in maternal and infant health, breast feeding, etc. I am all for it.

I feel this way because while I spent years (while TTC) and all of my pregnancy reading everything I could get my hands on about breastfeeding, birth and infant development and took BF classes, I was completely thrown for a loop after birth.

We had serious BF issues for the first couple days and I got really scared. A LC would have been a god send.

In hindsight, I wished would have hired someone to come to the house for a day or two.

So I guess I feel that if I, someone who over-educated herself and thought I had all the bases covered, needed help, there must be many less prepared women who truly could benefit from the right kind of care.
post #48 of 68
hmmm....perhaps a postpartum doula.
post #49 of 68
The government has ZERO business in MY business. They can't run what they already are in charge of. This angers me beyond everything else that *&#$* has done. I just hope impeachment starts soon.
post #50 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamatoakd View Post
I'm not sure why it's really necessary. If he really wants to help families with new babies, more leave time from work would seem to be a better benefit.
YES THIS for sure!! I Work for a Canadian based company, so am on the phone with Canadian residents ALL THE TIME. I just had two babies back to back, so the topic of maternity leave comes up allot, even with men. They think 6 weeks, 8-10 if you had a c section, is a freaking JOKE! AS of right now, Canada gets a year I think at 60% pay!! (Canadian mamas out there, correct me if I am wrong) Last I heard, they were pusing for 2 years, the second of which your job would be secured for you, but no pay. Still would be fine with me, as right now, your job is GONE if you are out more then 3 MONTHS!! How ridiculous is that?
post #51 of 68
the last thing I want is government people in my house right after having a baby. I have always wondered why people talk about the home visits from the nurses as a good thing (this is common in other countries with government run health care). i would much rather take my baby to a follow up clinic. I had to do this with my first and had the option with my third (#2 was a home birth)
post #52 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by AutumnAir View Post
As long as it's something you can opt in/out of as you wish I don't see a problem with it.
Yup, that's my take. I think I would appreciate a visit myself, but it should definitely be something you can choose to do or not.

And I agree that more leave time would be a much better way to help parents and new babies, at least more mandated unpaid leave without losing your job would be something.
post #53 of 68
Seems like an innocuous enough idea. I really don't understand the hostility. I live in Toronto and we have a public health nurse call a few days after birth to ask how things are going and if you want someone to come by. I didn't need it, as Ontario midwives are responsible for you and the newborn for the first 6 weeks post, and they come to your house for those appointments, at least until you feel up to leaving the house and visiting them.

The government has sweet dick all to do with my health care, other than being the single payer who pays the one insurance company. I make all of my health care decisions. No one acts as an in between me and my dr. / midwife / nurse practitioner ever.
post #54 of 68
I'm always surprised at the "government conspiracy" posts here on MDC. I would guess that my government has a lot more pressing things to worry about than whether or not I breast feed and what sort of books I read.

Anywhoo, I live in Canada and I had a nurse call me a few days after giving birth. TBH, she sounded relieved that she didn't have to come out! LOL (nurses here are already way overworked). However, she did give me information on some community support places I could go to when I was feeling up to it. There are "Baby & Me" programs where I live where you can go to once a week and have your baby weighed and a topic is discussed w/ a nurse. They covered topics like breastfeeding, baby development and cultural differences (I live in a very diverse area) etc. TBH I was just glad to get out of the house and talk to other adults! LOL

So overall, I think that its a great idea if its optional. There are tens of thousands of mommas out there who aren't as well informed as MDC'ers and I think can benefit from any kind of support.
post #55 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shera971 View Post
I'm always surprised at the "government conspiracy" posts here on MDC. I would guess that my government has a lot more pressing things to worry about than whether or not I breast feed and what sort of books I read.
post #56 of 68
At least this administration is THINKING about poor people and mothers. Generally it seems like these are the people who routinely get the shaft when it comes to help-either monetarily or through visits like this.

I loved my home visit-the nurse was very nice, pushed nothing, gave me a quick checkover, weighed my son, looked at my latch, and gave me fliers for all the different breastfeeding meetings around town.
post #57 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shera971 View Post
I'm always surprised at the "government conspiracy" posts here on MDC. I would guess that my government has a lot more pressing things to worry about than whether or not I breast feed and what sort of books I read.
Until you are confronted with information that CPS ACTUALLY finds excuses to take children into care for non vaxing, for example. I am not even certain that goes on, as I only read things like that online. My own experience with authorities' reactions at UC makes me very sceptical. I am not a conspiracy theorist, but things do happen, don't you agree? /i think your attitude is a very healthy one... until you get confronted with information or experience that makes you more cautious.
post #58 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by MittensKittens View Post
I am not even certain that goes on, as I only read things like that online.
Well exactly. The internet is not exactly a reliable picture of the real world.
post #59 of 68
Also an option here (in Ontario & Quebec) that you can easily decline. We also had pp midwifery care so didn't need it. For some of my low-income doula clients, it has been an invaluable service. Others didn't need it, and declined it.
Fwiw, I think public universal health insurance is the hallmark of a moral, caring society and as an outsider the debate going on in the US completely mystifies me.
post #60 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by proudmamanow View Post
Fwiw, I think public universal health insurance is the hallmark of a moral, caring society and as an outsider the debate going on in the US completely mystifies me.
And I disagree. I do not want those people in charge of my healthcare. They have no business in it.
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