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Why is Rice cereal SO BAD? - Page 2

post #21 of 54

Dr. Greene is the pediatrician behind a new campaign called "Get The White Out" (as in no more rice cereal for baby's first food). His website has a lot of great info on it.

 

http://www.drgreene.com/whiteout

post #22 of 54

I thought this was interesting.

 

Especially the parts that read:

  • "Furthermore, our naturopath said to not introduce cereals or grains until at least 9 months of age because a baby lacks the proper enzymes to digest them properly before that."
  • "delaying the introduction of food from six months to seven months increases nutrient absorption by 60% for life."

 

Me personally, I would rather my baby first eat living food than dead food.

post #23 of 54

We to follow a more Weston price/sally fallon/traditional/whole food approach to feeding ourselves. Babies stomach at this age (enzyme/digestion wise) are more apt to digest fat and meats better/more readily then any type of grains. I do not follow the baby feeding advice simply because we have egg allergies throughout our family and we make sure they are not allergic before feeding those...

Plus really why give them foods that are just "empty" calories perse. I don't remember who else on the thread posted the long information regarding grains/traditional foods but exactly what she said!

post #24 of 54

This recent thread was another example of how these discussions go on here with some good links.http://www.mothering.com/community/forum/thread/1291932/continue-with-just-mama-milk-or-add-some-food

post #25 of 54

I started my daughter on solids at 4 months and I regret it. NOt because she has allergy issues, which most people say now days can't be prevented by delaying foods. But becuase she didn't gain weight after starting on solids. I also weaned her at a year, which I regret becuase she gained even less after that. Breastmilk has all the nutrition needed for baby.

post #26 of 54

I would say rice cereal is "so bad" for several reasons

  • because it is nutritionally empty -- the only vitamins it contains are ones it has been artificially fortified with, which we know aren't very bioavailable (readily absorbed) by babies. So it can fill up room in the baby's stomach, while essentially not offering many calories or nutrients.
  • I don't feed my baby anything I wouldn't eat myself, and there's no way I would voluntarily eat rice cereal mixed with water.
  • because I don't want my baby's first food to be a highly-processed food (usually produced via factory farming methods and/or marketed by a formula company).

 

 

 

  •  
post #27 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post

 

The AAP says you can start solids between 4-6 months. 


Actually, the AAP recommendation is 6 months, not 4-6 months.  Here is a press release from 2010 discussing the difference between the 4 month and 6 month mark in terms of susceptibility to infectious diseases.

post #28 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by womenswisdom View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post

 

The AAP says you can start solids between 4-6 months. 


Actually, the AAP recommendation is 6 months, not 4-6 months.  Here is a press release from 2010 discussing the difference between the 4 month and 6 month mark in terms of susceptibility to infectious diseases.



Yeah, six months is BEST, but four months is ACCEPTABLE, according to the AAP. I have the current edition of their health guide, which also says between 4 and 6 months to start solids. 

post #29 of 54

I found a link on the internet that mirrors sentiments expressed here, but also includes references (see first blog response):

http://www.yingerbaobao.com/baby-helth/which-infant-rice-cereal.html

 

I did a search through the PUBMED literature in order to determine the bioavailability of iron absorption via cereals, and didn't find a clear answer.

 

The AAP does recommend solids are started b/twn 4-6 months if a baby shows readiness (ex. can sit upright & has good head/neck control, interest in eating foods), but also states that the ideal time to start is at 6 months after exclusive breastfeeding; they also recommend continual breastfeeding of course, and that foods are started slowly (no more than one new food introduced per week). Instead of iron-fortified cereals, an alternative is meat puree since it has better heme iron absorption; eating one vitamin C rich food per day (ex. apple, orange juice) is also recommended eventually in order to increase the iron absorption.

 

Thanks for bringing up the topic, I now plan to start my baby on meat puree and fruits/veggies when it comes time for that. I was skeptical about rice cereal w/ my first, since it doesn't really look like food & is fortified (ie. iron added). Going straight to the healthy whole foods makes sense.

 

I have 2 friends each w/ a son who eventually was diagnosed w/ iron-deficiency anemia, one breastfed for 1.5 yrs and the other formula fed, and both today have behavioral disorders (ADHD). Both of them needed additional iron supplementation as toddlers. I know this is anecdotal, but it highlights to me the importance of iron for brain development.

post #30 of 54

Meat puree is nasty. My baby wouldn't eat it. 

post #31 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hannah32 View Post

Meat puree is nasty. My baby wouldn't eat it. 


Funny. But there are many ways to make it, and kids need foods offered to them several times before the parent gives up (what is the often cited number? 20 times, or something like that?). Meat is naturally high in protein, iron, zinc, and B vitamins, so I hope my baby takes it! smile.gif

post #32 of 54

I also hated the smell. It's all good now. He's old enough for bits of our meat and loves to chomp on chicken bones! Yum! 

post #33 of 54

We give our 10 m.o. regular adult oatmeal, both dry and cooked.  Is this bad?  This is a very interesting topic.

post #34 of 54
I say go with what works. whats the point of being baby centered if you don't follow his cues and take rules that are meant to be genreral to heart instead? I started mine on whole grain brown rice cereal at 4 months, it's has helped a lot with sleep too. He has been sitting up since 3months old and will grab whole food outta my hand if Im not watching. I don't think there is anything bad about it, but every baby is different. My DS is 5.5 months and HUGE, healthy @ 23#, 26"

They say nothing until 6 months NOW, because it might reduce the milk intake. Remember that the feeding recommendations change every decade- when I told my Mom I wasn't going to give him solids until 6 months she was aghast smile.gif (I ate baby food from 10 weeks on)
post #35 of 54

Newsolarmomma2, thanks for reminding us to be relaxed about things. You're right, guidelines change constantly. When my mother had me, her OB told her to just give me pizza if I wanted it, whenever I wanted it. My mom was flabbergasted, since I had no teeth. But it illustrates how relaxed people used to be about things, compared to today. Our generation is a bit hyperaware & obsessive about every move of parenting.

post #36 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by caedenmomma View Post

We give our 10 m.o. regular adult oatmeal, both dry and cooked.  Is this bad?  This is a very interesting topic.



My 10 month old has only had adult oatmeal. Personally, I think baby oatmeal is a marketing scam. If you want a grain mush softer for your babe, cook it with a little more liquid, like the difference between cooked rice and congee, the Chinese rice porridge. 

 

Feeding the Whole Family has good ideas for grain mushes to make for baby and adults with real grains, not processed cereal. 

post #37 of 54

My only suggestion to the new moms on this forum (and everyone else reading) is take all of the "statistics" stated in this thread with a grain of salt. Do your own research, and file this thread away under anecdotal information. Because that's all this is.

post #38 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Of_60 View Post

My only suggestion to the new moms on this forum (and everyone else reading) is take all of the "statistics" stated in this thread with a grain of salt. Do your own research, and file this thread away under anecdotal information. Because that's all this is.



 

The scientifically proven facts on what, when, why, why not a baby should have this or that keeps changing anyway.

My advice is to think logically and follow your own instincts about what your baby should eat.

 

 

 

post #39 of 54

rice cereal isn't BAD. it isn't going to permanently damage your child in any way, neither is your decision to feed solids at 4 months, 6 months, or delay further.

 

however, rice cereal isn't the best thing to feed your baby either. it's not particularly nutritious, it doesn't have much flavour, and it's mostly an invention of the baby food industry. there are a ton of other options out there that make a good choice for baby's first food, whether you want to start with purees or follow BLW. whenever possible, i think it's best to feed a baby foods that your family actually eats... congee, oatmeal, grits, polenta -- these are all more natural forms of processed and packaged baby cereal. but, i would still chose to give my baby more nutrient packed first foods, like sweet potato, avocado, banana or other soft fruits and veggies. sweet potato and squash are especially good, as they are high in iron, easily digestible and delicious to babies.

 

post #40 of 54

As part of the dicussion on grains -- a 2006 study published by the journal Pediatrics found that early introduction of wheat (before 6 months) appeared to be protective (rather than triggering) for wheat allergies:

 

"Children who were first exposed to cereals after 6 months of age had an increased risk of wheat allergy compared with children first exposed to cereals before 6 months of age (after controlling for confounders including a family history of allergic disorders and history of food allergy before 6 months of age). All 4 children with detectable wheat-specific immunoglobulin E were first exposed to cereal grains after 6 months. A first-degree relative with asthma, eczema, or hives was also independently associated with an increased risk of wheat-allergy development.

 

CONCLUSIONS. Delaying initial exposure to cereal grains until after 6 months may increase the risk of developing wheat allergy. These results do not support delaying introduction of cereal grains for the protection of food allergy."

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