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tell me if this is too much TV - Page 8

Poll Results: what is your household TV MO?

 
  • 8% (29)
    TV free, no TV ever
  • 23% (81)
    TV limited, but we do the occassional movie or show
  • 33% (116)
    we limit but watch something everyday
  • 14% (49)
    we are aware, but don't really limit, we just like to do other things more
  • 16% (57)
    we don't limit usage, but we do police the content
  • 4% (17)
    no limits on it at all
349 Total Votes  
post #141 of 144
I voted no limit but police content. With 8 people in the house, someone is usually watching screen time (all screen time is lumped together--TV, computer, video games, etc. If it's watched on a screen, it's counted). During the day when the younger members are up, content is watched. The more adult shows/movies are watched when the youngsters are in bed. And while screen time is limited for each child, that doesn't mean that the computer or TV isn't used by others when they are awake.
post #142 of 144
I don't particularly follow the child-rearing philosophies of my parents, but one thing that I learned from them was that things done in moderation (with parental guidance) can be a decent approach to parenting. When I was growing up, we were allowed to watch certain television shows, allowed to eat sweets in moderation and were highly encouraged to make informed decisions about what we put into our brain and our bodies. All of us turned out pretty good and oddly we are all a bit more intolerant of certain pop culture things (like reality television) than our parents were. I would venture to say that all the commercialism that was thrown at us via television didn't have much of an effect on us at all. But, I believe that the reason for that is that our parents actually spent time with us and instilled certain values that are still important to us today. My guess is that if outside sources (television, other kids, society) become the primary or sole influencer of values in your child, then of course they're going to carry those values with them into adulthood.

That being said, we didn't expose DD to any television until she was over 2.5. She is permitted to watch a few television shows (Wonder Pets, Little Bill and Backyardigans) and surprisingly she is self-regulating even when it comes to those shows. They are commercial-free and she usually turns the TV off herself when they are over. DH and I don't have any guilt about this, because her daily life is full to the brim with other stuff and I think we've found a good balance. We both WOH full-time and she is in a Montessori program full-time. When we come home, the evening is full of other activities and often she'll forget about television as long as she is engaged with something else. Some of DD's cousins watch TV all day. Her other cousins don't watch TV at all. For us, it's about setting down rules rather than outright prohibition or unlimited access. We handle stuff like sweets the same way.

To us, achieving a balance is key. As long as DD understands that there is a time and place for everything, and that we may believe and act in ways that some people don't, then I think we have done pretty well.
post #143 of 144
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatsCradle View Post
I don't particularly follow the child-rearing philosophies of my parents, but one thing that I learned from them was that things done in moderation (with parental guidance) can be a decent approach to parenting. When I was growing up, we were allowed to watch certain television shows, allowed to eat sweets in moderation and were highly encouraged to make informed decisions about what we put into our brain and our bodies. All of us turned out pretty good and oddly we are all a bit more intolerant of certain pop culture things (like reality television) than our parents were. I would venture to say that all the commercialism that was thrown at us via television didn't have much of an effect on us at all. But, I believe that the reason for that is that our parents actually spent time with us and instilled certain values that are still important to us today. My guess is that if outside sources (television, other kids, society) become the primary or sole influence of values in your child, then of course they're going to carry those values with them into adulthood.
This balanced attitude is what I strive for. I voted, no limit, but police content. However, I don't think there is anything my husband and I watch in the evening that we don't 'let' our children watch as well. I am just against excessive control and arbitrary rules, though, and find that when given choices with explanation of benefits to those choices, our children are quiet wise in making choices. For example, right now my tv is off because my daughters turned it off after watching a movie the younger one picked. They decided they would rather play with each other. Some days, they would rather watch several movies, and other days, they'd rather run and play.
post #144 of 144
I think sewchris has a good point lumping all screen time together. Of course, it's unlikely a baby or probably even toddler is going to use the computer but as your child(ren) get older, they will. For us, our TV has wi-fi capabilities, and we can find pretty much any TV show online -- so they are almost one-in-the-same. I'm sure there are parents who are so anti-TV that they will be anti-internet, too... b/c if they are so intertwined right now, surely in 5+ years as kids get older, they really will be.

I agree, CatsCradle, all things in moderation.
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