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tell me if this is too much TV - Page 4

Poll Results: what is your household TV MO?

 
  • 8% (29)
    TV free, no TV ever
  • 23% (81)
    TV limited, but we do the occassional movie or show
  • 33% (116)
    we limit but watch something everyday
  • 14% (49)
    we are aware, but don't really limit, we just like to do other things more
  • 16% (57)
    we don't limit usage, but we do police the content
  • 4% (17)
    no limits on it at all
349 Total Votes  
post #61 of 144
I don't have cable either but I don't restrict what they watch either movie wise or at my parents' home. They end up watching less than 6 hours per week, though, because they are in school all day and we are usually too busy in the evenings to watch a family movie. If they are sick or have a babysitter that number increases.

I doubt the kid is actually 'watching' the soap so I would not count that.
post #62 of 144
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
The OP didn't say a soap opera "most" days. She also didn't say a movie every day. And, if you add up Sesame Street, a soap opera, and a movie, you get somewhere between 3-4 hours, not 4-5 hours. She also didn't specify what kind of movie, and there are movies that come in at not much over an hour, as opposed to 2 or 2+.

It is a lot of tv, but it's not 5 hours.

Thanks StormBride. I should have said video as I really just meant something on a tape like an elmo video or a tape about ducks or kitties both of which are only 30minutes, but sometimes it will be the Jungle Book or Stuart little 2 and then she usually is up and ready to do something before they ae half over anyway.
post #63 of 144
My three get a show everyday after they clean up the house and set the dinner table while I cook dinner. When DH is home, the tv seems to be on constantly (even if as he says there's nothing on). I'd like to get rid of the stupid thing (at least cable anyway) by that's a no go with DH. We may do an occasional movie- but that is pretty rare.
post #64 of 144
Quote:
Originally Posted by sisteeesmama View Post
Any info from a more credible source?
A great book about the effects of screen time is "The Plug in Drug", by Marie Winn. Over 25 years of research and a convincing argument that will really make you think. Here's a link to her page concerning the newest edition:

http://www.mariewinn.com/plugin.htm
post #65 of 144
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teenytoona View Post
They do not know what to do with themselves when we go camping.
This makes me sad. I can't imagine a kid not knowing how to have fun on a camping trip!

Quote:
Originally Posted by waiflywaif View Post
Just FYI, there is research showing that even TV as "background noise" is detrimental to language development:
http://www.medpagetoday.com/Pediatrics/Parenting/14484

I say that because I hear a lot of people talk about "oh he's not really watching it"---it's still not ideal for a growing brain.
I'm going to have to read that. I'm always interested in what this kind of research says, because my personal experiences with ds1 and dd1 have been very different, yk?
post #66 of 144
We don't own a TV, but occasionally watch DVDs on the computer. DS probably watches 2 or 3 30 minute DVDs in a typical week. We have weeks where he doesn't watch anything and weeks where he watches much more than usual - depends on the weather (whether we can play outdoors or not), how busy the week is, and whether I need the time to write a paper/study for a test/clean the house before guests arrive, etc. On the whole, though, I'm comfortable with the amount he is exposed to, and by just doing movies, I can completely control the content.
post #67 of 144
I voted that we don't really limit it. We don't really need too. DD is 4.

There are times when the amount she watched picks up and times when she wouldn't watch it if I said she had to.

We restrict content and encourage her to self regulate and make choices with TV and computer and video games that feel right to her and her body and her emotional state.

She watches tv but she also reads, plays outside, rides bikes, does arts and crafts, uses her imagination, etc.

When she was younger I was really strict about TV because I felt so guilty about it. I would allow her 30 minutes a day even though my dh works 16 hour days and she never took naps. It was really hard on me and when I loosened up it worked a lot better for our family.

I don't dispute that there is probably a lot of very valid evidince that too much screen time is bad for kids. I am just a firm believer that in modern western society we are in a screen world now and it is important for everyone especially kids to learn to navigate that society in a way that works for them.
post #68 of 144
Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post
A great book about the effects of screen time is "The Plug in Drug", by Marie Winn. Over 25 years of research and a convincing argument that will really make you think. Here's a link to her page concerning the newest edition:

http://www.mariewinn.com/plugin.htm
Quote:
Originally Posted by waiflywaif
Just FYI, there is research showing that even TV as "background noise" is detrimental to language development:
http://www.medpagetoday.com/Pediatrics/Parenting/14484

I say that because I hear a lot of people talk about "oh he's not really watching it"---it's still not ideal for a growing brain.
Thanks for these!
post #69 of 144
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teenytoona View Post
They do not know what to do with themselves when we go camping. Sigh. We are working on it. They've got a strong tie to their "digital IV" and DH also has such an issue (he seems to need to watch some tv to come down at night). We've come a LOONG way from having to watch a movie every.time.we.ate. So that's progress. But IMO it's still on too much. We're working on it.
The book (The Plug-in Drug) I provided the link for discusses these kinds of issues and also offers suggestions. I read it when dd was a baby and it really made me realize that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure when it comes to these kinds of things.

We have an inside joke with dd... if she comes to me to say, "I'm bored, can I watch TV", my reply is, "Go find a stick." A couple of years ago, when we were camping, dd occupied herself and had fun one evening at the campsite with nothing more than a stick. She spent almost 2 hours just playing with a stick (no hitting or poking, just drawing in the soil and play acting with it). I pointed out to her that with a good imagination, even a simple stick can provide hours of entertainment. It really clicked with her. We don't usually have a problem with her occupying herself without electronic media, but when she bugs us about it, we talk about "the stick". I wouldn't have thought to point that out to her if I hadn't read the above-mentioned book. It's really a good read.
post #70 of 144
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
This makes me sad. I can't imagine a kid not knowing how to have fun on a camping trip!


I'm going to have to read that. I'm always interested in what this kind of research says, because my personal experiences with ds1 and dd1 have been very different, yk?
Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post
The book (The Plug-in Drug) I provided the link for discusses these kinds of issues and also offers suggestions. I read it when dd was a baby and it really made me realize that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure when it comes to these kinds of things.

We have an inside joke with dd... if she comes to me to say, "I'm bored, can I watch TV", my reply is, "Go find a stick." A couple of years ago, when we were camping, dd occupied herself and had fun one evening at the campsite with nothing more than a stick. She spent almost 2 hours just playing with a stick (no hitting or poking, just drawing in the soil and play acting with it). I pointed out to her that with a good imagination, even a simple stick can provide hours of entertainment. It really clicked with her. We don't usually have a problem with her occupying herself without electronic media, but when she bugs us about it, we talk about "the stick". I wouldn't have thought to point that out to her if I hadn't read the above-mentioned book. It's really a good read.
Thanks for the book reference.

Yeah we're making progress with them, but it's a slow road. As I said, at least they're not watching tv for every meal. Though DH does come down on tv, he doesn't watch as much as he used to, nor is it as central a part of our lives as it is at their moms, so we're workign on it.

My biggest concern is that come wintertime, when they're too cold to go out... Hmmm s/o thread brewin' in my head.
post #71 of 144
I think that is a lot of television for anyone, let alone a 20 mo.

Our DS (24 mos) watches one 30 minute program per week - Thomas and Friends on Saturday morning.
post #72 of 144
Thread Starter 
I guess what I have realized from reading this thread is that it is not really too much for us because it works for us.
MY dd is VERY developed, people always think she is 3 not 20mos. She has great vocab and loves to talk and interact. I can't see that it has hindered her and if anything she is self regulating because she easily goes off to do other things.
If these are the the things to watch for then I will just make sure and look out for changes that seem like they could be negative and adjust from there.


Thanks for all the answers and info!
post #73 of 144
DS is 16 months old and I've put on the tv a total of 5 times for him to actually watch, but he's never watched it yet. I am hoping to hold off on tv/movie watching until he's 2, but I'm having a baby when he's 22 months - so there might be some more tv watching then.
post #74 of 144
I'm no big fan of the AAP. Their stance on cosleeping is infuriating, their continued refusal to take a stand on routine circumcision is appalling, and their position on infant feeding is wishy-washy. They have steadfastly insisted on the safety of submitting tiny babies to an arsenal of dangerous ingredients via vaccines.

I do however find their recommendation about TV pretty compelling. Mostly that's exactly just because the AAP is such a conservative, mainstream organization. For them to make such a strong and definite statement about TV watching means that they have some very serious concerns. They don't fly in the face of mainstream opinion very often, after all, and they must have known that most of America would just laugh, say "get real," and go back to letting their kids watch hours of TV. And yet they made the statement anyway. I think that's something to think about.
post #75 of 144
Quote:
Originally Posted by momasana View Post
I think that is a lot of television for anyone, let alone a 20 mo.
You know, part of me agrees. But...I do know kids who are just plunked in front of a tv pretty much all day, and the amount in the OP is so trivial, by comparison...
post #76 of 144
Quote:
Originally Posted by Llyra View Post
I'm no big fan of the AAP. Their stance on cosleeping is infuriating, their continued refusal to take a stand on routine circumcision is appalling, and their position on infant feeding is wishy-washy. They have steadfastly insisted on the safety of submitting tiny babies to an arsenal of dangerous ingredients via vaccines.

I do however find their recommendation about TV pretty compelling. Mostly that's exactly just because the AAP is such a conservative, mainstream organization. For them to make such a strong and definite statement about TV watching means that they have some very serious concerns. They don't fly in the face of mainstream opinion very often, after all, and they must have known that most of America would just laugh, say "get real," and go back to letting their kids watch hours of TV. And yet they made the statement anyway. I think that's something to think about.
You say so well what was in the back of my mind, WHY I believe AAP on this even though I don't agree on other stuff.
post #77 of 144
Quote:
Originally Posted by waiflywaif View Post
Just FYI, there is research showing that even TV as "background noise" is detrimental to language development:
http://www.medpagetoday.com/Pediatrics/Parenting/14484

I say that because I hear a lot of people talk about "oh he's not really watching it"---it's still not ideal for a growing brain.
Interesting. Tyr, funnily enough is waaay ahead of many of his peers in the language department. It also hasn't affected his love of books, music and play.
post #78 of 144
We don't really limit tv for the most part.

My kids (7 and 3) watch cartoons on Saturday mornings, a little tv in the evenings with me if I'm watching and some movies. We don't have cable, just Netflix and a few tv channels. They're very good about self-limiting anyways and we spend alot of time outside. Plus they're in school/daycare most of the day so a few movies a week doesn't bother me at all.

I think it you think it's too much, it probably is. If it works for you, then leave it alone.
post #79 of 144
we watch an occasional movie on the computer here and there-- some weeks we have 'movie night.'

But we watch no commercial TV or cable, so it is always netflixs on the computer, or a DVD/video.
post #80 of 144
I think thats fine.
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