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post #21 of 71
Thread Starter 
Wow, lots of food for thought from all ends of the spectrum. I wanted to answer a couple questions and while I haven't had a chance to study each response in depth, a few comments off the top of my head just from skimming the thread.

Yes, ds was breastfed from birth to about 2.5. He will be 4 in November. We do not see any kind of holistic practitioner at all, just an allopath for yearly checkups.

Self-regulation. I have heard of it and read about it but I have very mixed feelings on the topic. First, I understand and have read that severe restriction of goodies can lead to gorging and obsession. Along those same lines, I feel like severe restriction would be us not allowing him to partake during special holidays/parties, not allowing him to Trick or Treat, having it in the home but severely limiting his access to it or making it highly desirable by forcing him to clean his plate and use it as a reward. I feel like we allow and model a VERY reasonable level of candy and sweets by giving him the freedom to accept goodies when offered without restriction at parties and from loved ones (grandparents, etc.)

But at the same time let me be totally clear that we are talking about straight up candy here. Not muffins baked with chocolate chips, or oatmeal raisin cookies. We are talking Snickers Bars, Reeses, Rolos, Three Musketeers. CANDY. Is it normal for kids to be allowed to eat candy on a normal day? Maybe the problem here is with me--I don't eat candy. I don't like it, I don't buy it, I don't eat it, I never have. I did not have candy in the home growing up. Determining how much candy is reasonable to eat in one day seems super strange to me, because IMO *no* amount of candy is reasonable to eat in a day. Do other families really dole out candy every day/every week?

That said it's not like we are total strangers to dessert. We have a carton of ice cream in the freezer right now, for example, and last night we all enjoyed a scoop after dinner. I bake a lot with the kids and we make cookies maybe once or twice a month.

Natural sugars per day, I would say the bulk is from fruit & dairy. He doesn't drink milk and we don't always have yogurt so an average day of dairy/fruit might include a 1/2 cup of berries and a scoop of fresh unsweetened whipped cream with breakfast, a scoop of cottage cheese for snack and a sliced apple with lunch. Refined grains are not in our daily diet; we only buy whole grain bread, pasta and rice. I do use white flour bread for french toast & pancakes and 50/50 for baking, but those are are consumed maybe once or twice a week rather than daily.

Oh and when it comes to self-regulation one thing that does come to my head is addiction. If it's truly an addictive problem, I feel like putting a big ol' bowl of M&Ms on the table and letting him go nuts would be like giving an alcoholic keys to the liquor cabinet and saying he will be able to control the obsession once he learns to self-regulate. KWIM? I can see it from both sides, I'm just really not sure.

Thanks so much, I can't wait until bedtime when I can really sit and read every response in depth.
post #22 of 71
subbing. I have a sugar monkey at my house too. We've tried not making sweets into anything too special, serving dessert right alongside regular dinner, etc. Somewhere along the line, something changed. Maybe when we had company or something. Anyway, I'm interested in all the responses. I know that I personally will binge on something if it is forbidden, so I hesitate to go that route. We've done elimination diets in the past (not for sugar, but for gluten, eggs, dairy, etc.) and had no improvements. I also have trouble with hypoglycemia.

I suspect at this point, that DD is most interested in sugar because she is tired. We are trying to help her regulate her sleeping better, but we're not too good at it ourselves. I also crave sugar when I am tired. I think this is where I'll start for us.

Very interesting info and suggestions everyone has.
post #23 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Starflower View Post
I suspect at this point, that DD is most interested in sugar because she is tired. We are trying to help her regulate her sleeping better, but we're not too good at it ourselves. I also crave sugar when I am tired. I think this is where I'll start for us.
Ds always starts up with asking for sweets if we stay awake too late. I don't offer bedtime snacks because I don't think eating before bed is a great habit, not that I don't help him get food if he says he is hungry. But invariably in the evening, he just wants sweets and I think the real solution is getting to bed earlier. Easier said than done, some days. Lately, he's been happy with frozen apple juice (he scrapes it out of a mug with a spoon) which I like because it satisfies his sweet craving, takes a while to eat (so he eats fewer mindless calories), and I spike it with a splash of pomegranate juice for a little extra anti-oxidant power. When he went off naps (at age 6!), he wanted sweets in the afternoon, more.
post #24 of 71
Sweets taste good and young kids sometimes find that begging and obssessive behaviors really work well to get them what they want. I don't think that there is any mystery as to why someone would like sweets even though they rarely have them and I don't think that you can do anything about this other than continue on the way you are doing now. I think it sounds like a pretty nice balance, though personally I wouldn't mix yogurts or worry about jam types. Everyone has different taste buds and his prefer sweets. Everyone has preferences and wants and there is not a lot someone else can do about them.

It may help him to know the date of the next sweet so he doesn't have to obsess about it all the time. Perhaps shopping day could also be flavored milk day or you could consider allowing him to have flavored milk and a fresh fruit for breakfast instead of orange juice (which tends to be sugary anyways).
post #25 of 71
Our family sounds pretty similar to yours. It sounds like we may have a bit more sugar than you. Pb&J would have typical jam. He get's whole grain pancakes topped with syrup. Ds gets chocolate milk every other or every few days (although this is pretty recent).
Similarly though most of our sweets are homebaked goodies (made with unrefined sugar and partly whole wheat flour). We buy ice cream occasionally (maybe once a month). Most of ds's exposure to candy has been from school (he's 4). Christmas and holidays we buy candy but I buy mostly chocolates and pretty much stear clear of the really refined corn syrup candies. Our problem here is that ds is starting to expect a treat every night after dinner. I try to keep it in moderation because as a kid I rarely got sweets. I remember as a child sneaking into the pantry to stick my finger in powdered sugar. And trying to convince my parents I had a cold so I could have the sweet cough syrup (if that's not horrible!). So I never wanted to restrict ds's sugar intake too much.

Do you think if you let him have a few more "healthier" sweets he wouldn't obsess quite as much about the candy?
post #26 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by StrawberryFields View Post
Wow, lots of food for thought from all ends of the spectrum. I wanted to answer a couple questions and while I haven't had a chance to study each response in depth, a few comments off the top of my head just from skimming the thread.

Yes, ds was breastfed from birth to about 2.5. He will be 4 in November. We do not see any kind of holistic practitioner at all, just an allopath for yearly checkups.

Self-regulation. I have heard of it and read about it but I have very mixed feelings on the topic. First, I understand and have read that severe restriction of goodies can lead to gorging and obsession. Along those same lines, I feel like severe restriction would be us not allowing him to partake during special holidays/parties, not allowing him to Trick or Treat, having it in the home but severely limiting his access to it or making it highly desirable by forcing him to clean his plate and use it as a reward. I feel like we allow and model a VERY reasonable level of candy and sweets by giving him the freedom to accept goodies when offered without restriction at parties and from loved ones (grandparents, etc.)

But at the same time let me be totally clear that we are talking about straight up candy here. Not muffins baked with chocolate chips, or oatmeal raisin cookies. We are talking Snickers Bars, Reeses, Rolos, Three Musketeers. CANDY. Is it normal for kids to be allowed to eat candy on a normal day? Maybe the problem here is with me--I don't eat candy. I don't like it, I don't buy it, I don't eat it, I never have. I did not have candy in the home growing up. Determining how much candy is reasonable to eat in one day seems super strange to me, because IMO *no* amount of candy is reasonable to eat in a day. Do other families really dole out candy every day/every week?
That said it's not like we are total strangers to dessert. We have a carton of ice cream in the freezer right now, for example, and last night we all enjoyed a scoop after dinner. I bake a lot with the kids and we make cookies maybe once or twice a month.

Natural sugars per day, I would say the bulk is from fruit & dairy. He doesn't drink milk and we don't always have yogurt so an average day of dairy/fruit might include a 1/2 cup of berries and a scoop of fresh unsweetened whipped cream with breakfast, a scoop of cottage cheese for snack and a sliced apple with lunch. Refined grains are not in our daily diet; we only buy whole grain bread, pasta and rice. I do use white flour bread for french toast & pancakes and 50/50 for baking, but those are are consumed maybe once or twice a week rather than daily.

Oh and when it comes to self-regulation one thing that does come to my head is addiction. If it's truly an addictive problem, I feel like putting a big ol' bowl of M&Ms on the table and letting him go nuts would be like giving an alcoholic keys to the liquor cabinet and saying he will be able to control the obsession once he learns to self-regulate. KWIM? I can see it from both sides, I'm just really not sure.

Thanks so much, I can't wait until bedtime when I can really sit and read every response in depth.
I didn't realize your DS was only three. For some reason I thought he was more like 7-8 years old. So I'm not sure if I agree with what I said earlier about self-regulation.

To answer your question, we do eat candy on a weekly if not daily basis at our house. We don't gorge on it by any stretch, but we do tend to have it around. I think the norm varies a lot in regards to this. A lot of families don't keep candy around at all, but I think there are many like us who do.
post #27 of 71
Does he watch a lot of TV?

We're not TV free. DD (3) is really loving Dora and Max & Ruby so I let her watch a little each day. Both shows are cute and innocuous most days. But both have episodes that really drive home the idea that candy, chocolate and ice cream are DESIRABLE.

I know for DD, she incorporates those things into her imaginative world when she's watched an episode that dwells on sweets. Just today she handed me one of her cylindrical wooden blocks and asked me if I wanted ice cream. She's never eaten an ice cream cone, but she knew just what to do with her imaginary one. I asked her what flavor it was and she told me "Blue."

Just thought I'd throw it out there.
post #28 of 71
My DS is not obssessed with candy but he certainly does enjoy it. So if I happen to have any in the house and he knows about it, he asks for it. What I've taken to doing is saying he can have something special for dessert after dinner. Then I will take the usual dessert (yogurt or fruit usually) and place one or two small candies on top. Literally like one or two jelly beans, or two chocolate chips. He thinks its the cats a@@ and seems completely satisfied. Maybe that might satisfy your DS that he actually IS getting candy, and make you feel ok by the fact that the amount is small. Just my 2 cents.
post #29 of 71
Do look into diabeties connection.

I would also consider making treats in moderation the norm.

I would also look into seeing how much carbs/fats/protein he is eating. My child that craves the sugar and candy the most is the one that I need to balance fats/protein more. She is also the child that eats the least amount of food out of my children.

She is a super slow eater. I think some times she eats so slow she feels full before she has had enough protein and carbs to make it through the day. I also found that she would many times want sweets when she was thirsty.
post #30 of 71
We don't have a ton of candy - just from time to time. I don't think it's that unusual, nor do I think a fountain of candy is a basic child right.

We have kids with sweet tooths in my family. I remember my nephew driving me around the bend at about 6 years old begging for candy - but he actually meant food, at least some of the time. He had (and still has) a really active metabolism. It helped to give him protein with most snacks, and frequently.

At 3 my son developed some habits that were about control. They might have looked like a craving but I think it was about the control. We started giving him some control but not wholesale - more like "yes you may have one granola bar today - would you like it now or later?" That worked for a while. After that what worked was the granola bar at the same time of day each day so he knew when it was coming. Now this may not relate at all to your experience but I thought I would throw it out there.

I guess one question I have is whether really sweet fruits fill the same need? Not dried but just sweet, like pineapple, mango, etc. It might help a bit with developing some regulation to have those around - but served with cheese or yogurt. You could also compromise with a bit of honey or maple syrup on oatmeal. In other words, you might try meeting him halfway a bit and see if that helps.
post #31 of 71
Many times people crave sweets and sugary desserts when they are not consuming enough protein. Most people do not consume enough protein.
post #32 of 71
I eat candy daily. I don't eat much, but it's in my snack drawer at work. Right now I have mini-eggs and twizzlers. I had 2 twizzlers after my morning tea and ~10 mini-eggs as my afternoon snack. I really like candy. I've worked hard to figure out ways to eat it in moderation. I only buy candy that comes in small pieces or that can be eaten that way, so no snickers bars because I'd eat them all in one go.
post #33 of 71
Why is he "addicted" to candy? Because it's sweet. Because it's good. Because it's tasty. And because he is severely limited in his "sweet" intake. The normal thing about people is that they want things they can't have---and that goes for kids as well as adults!!!

Do I think it is normal for a kid to have candy every day? Probably not. But, a couple times a week? Sure. I don't see any harm in that. Same thing with chocolate milk----if he doesn't drink milk, but would drink chocolate milk, then why not? Mostly everybody likes chocolate milk. And, he doesn't get any kind of sweet stuff unless there's a party or holiday or event, according to your post. And, even though you said that you don't "restrict" the candy because you let him go trick-or-treating, you only let him pick out a little candy and give the rest back in exchange for a toy---that is pretty restrictive, especially after he's dressed up and walked all over the place to collect the candy! He doesn't want a toy----he wants CANDY!! Keep the candy, and dole it out every day until it is gone. That is what my mother used to do---let me have a couple pieces every day until it was gone.

I hate to say it, but it sounds like your diet is pretty strict and severe for a young kid. Even though you are only making "healthy" things, remember that moderation is key when it comes to food and eating. You can have pie, cake, whatever----but you can't have it every day and you can't eat the entire pie/cake in one sitting.

Plus---even though you don't have it at home, he has been exposed to it at parties, holidays, etc., and compared to the food he is eating, it tastes a whole lot better!! And because you don't have it in the home, since he wants it SOOOO much, he talks about it, repeats it, tries to write it on the grocery list, etc.

And, not all chocolate is bad for you. Dark chocolate is actually very good for you!! I don't think there's anything wrong with having chocolate in the house and giving him some a couple times a week----maybe even every other day. He isn't going to get fat eating a little candy bar a couple times a week, and it will stop him from chanting about chocolate all the time. You can regulate it in the house, just like everything else.

I am kind of agreeing with other posters here though, as far as letting him "have at it"!!! My oldest brother LOVED maraschino cherries as a kid. My parents used to keep a jar in the fridge for when friends came over and they made cocktails............but when the friends came over, the jar was always empty!! One day, my mother got so pissed off, that she bought a gallon of maraschino cherries and gave him a spoon and let him go!! He got through about half the gallon of cherries, said he felt sick and ran in the bathroom to puke.......and puke..........and puke.......To this day he cannot eat a maraschino cherry because it makes his stomach turn!!
post #34 of 71
Sorry, OP, didn't see your ds is almost 4! We do keep candy around the house but I make it. So not regular stuff. When I do make it, ds would gobble it ALL up if I didn't put any regulation on it so I say only a couple pieces or whatever. For the record, I have a hard time with self regulation also and was given total access to all sweets growing up.

And recipe for choc. nut milk per a pp request:
4 C water
1 C soaked nuts-almond, brazil, hemp seed, etc
pinch sea salt
1/2 c pitted dates (or a couple T honey)
Blend, strain. Add milk back to blender and add: 1-2 heaping T raw cacao, vanilla & cinnamon to taste if you like. You could also use carob. Enjoy! It's yummy with some ice or a frz banana too then it's like a shake!
post #35 of 71
i have 2 of those here it was worse when i would cave to artifical flavors and colors. i have made changes and now it is better...i always have things on hand and free to the taking. processed snacks were a must in the begining because they became like a major treat because i never bought them. kinda over load his system with other options daily. sweetened cereal in a bowl.
other things i do is
choco milk is easy- milk, cocoa powder and a form of sweetner...i blend it and then serve.
chocolate is no artifical flavors and colors and dark chocolate.
frozen 100% fruit pops.
baked cookies-they die for molassas cookies they get rolled in sugar b4 baking.
herbal teas that are sweetened.
post #36 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeMarie View Post
Why is he "addicted" to candy? Because it's sweet. Because it's good. Because it's tasty. And because he is severely limited in his "sweet" intake. The normal thing about people is that they want things they can't have---and that goes for kids as well as adults!!!

Do I think it is normal for a kid to have candy every day? Probably not. But, a couple times a week? Sure. I don't see any harm in that. Same thing with chocolate milk----if he doesn't drink milk, but would drink chocolate milk, then why not? Mostly everybody likes chocolate milk. And, he doesn't get any kind of sweet stuff unless there's a party or holiday or event, according to your post. And, even though you said that you don't "restrict" the candy because you let him go trick-or-treating, you only let him pick out a little candy and give the rest back in exchange for a toy---that is pretty restrictive, especially after he's dressed up and walked all over the place to collect the candy! He doesn't want a toy----he wants CANDY!! Keep the candy, and dole it out every day until it is gone. That is what my mother used to do---let me have a couple pieces every day until it was gone.

I hate to say it, but it sounds like your diet is pretty strict and severe for a young kid. Even though you are only making "healthy" things, remember that moderation is key when it comes to food and eating. You can have pie, cake, whatever----but you can't have it every day and you can't eat the entire pie/cake in one sitting.

Plus---even though you don't have it at home, he has been exposed to it at parties, holidays, etc., and compared to the food he is eating, it tastes a whole lot better!! And because you don't have it in the home, since he wants it SOOOO much, he talks about it, repeats it, tries to write it on the grocery list, etc.

And, not all chocolate is bad for you. Dark chocolate is actually very good for you!! I don't think there's anything wrong with having chocolate in the house and giving him some a couple times a week----maybe even every other day. He isn't going to get fat eating a little candy bar a couple times a week, and it will stop him from chanting about chocolate all the time. You can regulate it in the house, just like everything else.

I am kind of agreeing with other posters here though, as far as letting him "have at it"!!! My oldest brother LOVED maraschino cherries as a kid. My parents used to keep a jar in the fridge for when friends came over and they made cocktails............but when the friends came over, the jar was always empty!! One day, my mother got so pissed off, that she bought a gallon of maraschino cherries and gave him a spoon and let him go!! He got through about half the gallon of cherries, said he felt sick and ran in the bathroom to puke.......and puke..........and puke.......To this day he cannot eat a maraschino cherry because it makes his stomach turn!!
Wow, this post has some crazy assumptions in it. The OP is not "severely restricting" her child's diet- it sounds very moderate to me- and I have a feeling the healthy eating is not to keep her child from getting fat.
This sounds like an over-the-top response to candy so it goes to reason there may be something physiological going on. Possibly a sugar sensitivity or maybe yeast overgrowth or SOMETHING outside the norm. I highly doubt that this is a child who will stop obsessing if given more candy.
post #37 of 71
Thread Starter 
I'm not really sure how I feel right now. I have to say I do wholeheartedly disagree that ds' diet is extreme and restrictive. We have a large extended family and get-togethers and activities are the norm for us. For example, Saturday ds slept over at Grandma and Grandpa's... pretty sure they had ice cream and maybe even a few more treats, I never asked. Sunday we went to a festival and he got to have a root beer (his first). Monday after dinner we had a scoop of chocolate ice cream. Today, we did not have any sweet treats outside of fresh fruit, but I did make french toast with strawberries and pineapples for breakfast. In 4 days, I feel like two servings of ice cream and a root beer is more than reasonable for a three year old. I'm not sure I am going to bend on that although I will take some time to reflect on it. I am also not sure how I feel about actually going out and buying candy bars to have around the house either. That has never been done in my whole life, it just seems very odd to me. Candy is for parties, holidays, Grandma's house, etc. They pass out Dum Dums at the liquor store, the bank, and the popcorn store. I have never restricted him from accepting any of that but I am not sure that he needs to have it added in to his daily home environment on top of what he gets in the outside world.

Definitely not worried about him "getting fat" LOL he's almost 4 and not even 30 lbs yet.

As for the Halloween thing, it works for us, he loves picking out a couple favorites and gladly hands over the rest to "buy" a toy. Definitely has never needed to be coerced or convinced in that respect. We trick or treat 2-3 times here and between two kids (one being a baby!) that is an obscene amount of candy to keep IMO.

I am really interested in how chocolate cravings are related to magnesium, and I think I will start by incorporating some magnesium rich foods into our diet and see if anything changes. And I will offer him the choice of chocolate milk with breakfast in lieu of OJ if he wants, OJ and choc milk would be about equal in my book. Not sure what he will choose, I give him the OJ because I love OJ w/ breakfast and when he sees me having some he asks for it too. We have OJ maybe about 3x a week.

Thanks for the continued advice. Even the suggestions I am not sure I am comfortable with have given me a lot to think about. I appreciate seeing all sides of the issue.
post #38 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by StrawberryFields View Post
All that said, when we go somewhere I have never restricted the kids from participating in activities with other children. At parties, festivals, and friends' houses they are free to join in pinatas, cupcakes, sprinkles, popsicles, whatever. They go Trick or Treating and pick a small amount of candy to keep and turn the rest in for a new toy. They have eaten at McDonald's and Chuck E Cheese and all of that.
I wonder if its like my DD - candy is heavily associated with parties and fun. Its not so much the candy itself its just that what she really wants is "a party."

She had a donut with sprinkles for the first time when we were on an outing with a friend and she was having a blast. We stopped into Rocket donuts for a treat and for months following that she was obsessed with donuts with sprinkles. We started getting the smaller donuts with sprinkles at the grocery store and the excitement quickly wore off. She no longer begs for donuts but does have one occasionally (once a month).

It might be useful to allow some candy occasionally in a boring, non-party type setting, so that the association between candy and fun is weakened. Kind of like, unexpectedly, "Oh, its time for some candy" and hand him a piece, then go about your business completely nonchalantly.
post #39 of 71
I've got one that wants chocolate milk too--and with SYRUP not POWDER for whatever reason. (I've bought both at times and I've also used hot chocolate which doesn't really mix very well if you don't heat it...we did that once. I think that's what really did it.)

My objection is not really the chocolate milk. I actually think it'd be better than juice, because of the protein, fat, etc. over just plain sweet, even though you do get *some* vitamins in juice. It's that most of the syrups have HFCS. And since my kids have a STRONG presence of diabetes on one side of the family--type 2, diet induced.....I stay away from HFCS if at all possible. (their dad and his mom both are type 2 diabetic, and his dad is not at all the typical overweight type2. When I say it's diet-induced, I mean white bread and a SERIOUS sugar overload problem induced. When I look back though, knowing what I've learned, I think he craved sugar because he was pre-diabetic/unknown diabetic.)

THAT SAID....my children who can ask for candy are almost 5 and 2 1/2. The little one is the one who asks for candy specifically 9 times out of 10. We *do* usually have a bag of mixed from the Brach's thing at the grocery store or a bag of M&M's or something.

YES, I would say they have a piece or two of candy daily. And like I said, it's USUALLY my 2 year old who intiates it.

BUT...I have noticed also that probably 90% of the time when she asks, it is because she is hungry. And I have also noticed that on the days I stay ahead of food requests--by offering to make something or just presenting something--ahead of her having to ask, she does not seem to remember to ask for candy as much. Also, on days when we are busy, she just doesn't have as much time to think to ask for it as days when we are just at home doing the normal at-home stuff.

Also, like another poster said, one or two small candies can often be enough to make them TOTALLY HAPPY. One of those small 70 cent or whatever bags of MnM's can last my two kids days--INCLUDING me snitching a couple--because I can hand them 5 MnM's per candy request and they'll be happy.

SO.....to stop the 'obsession', I would...

Let him pick the occasional treat and eat it. Or buy some and dole out a piece or two a day.

I know you probably do this already...but...really pay attention to how often he's eating...they really *do* get hungry a lot more often than we do. Something I forget sometimes. And I have one (the older) who I think needs to be reminded to stop and eat more often than I think. (He's very active and does not want to stop playing to eat.) I think other people are right on that the requests for candy come out of desparate need for energy/food. *I* am actually going to do this with mine as well, as I get a *lot* of requests for treats and candy....

I just had a totally random thought. How much does this request for candy/sweets/junk come out of the fact that they are foods that can be eaten quickly without sitting and going through the formality of a meal? I think nothing of letting my kids walk around outside and play while eating a popsicle.
I am going to be more "free" with snacks that are more nutritious.

I *totally* understand the desire to limit their sugar intake. I used to complain constantly about others giving them sugar and "what is this going to do to them?' etc etc.

Here is the thing that puts it in perspective for me. How much sugar can they possibly be consuming, even if they eat a sucker (for example) every day? In all reality, not much. In comparison to what a typical child eats in a typical mainstream daycare center like I used to work in, it is NOTHING.

If they eat typical balanced, healthy meals and snacks throughout the day, even a piece of candy *daily* is really NOT going to harm them.

And it may do some GOOD--in preventing a big obsession with it that causes them to do things like hoard it and hide it, gorge on it, any chance they get.

It's just hit me that this is absolutely no different than what I observed in Germany as a teenager.
In Germany, teenagers (I don't know the *exact age*) can buy drinks at the dance clubs.
Our group stayed with a group of German teens and we all went to one of the clubs once while I was there.
The American teenagers were absolutely *obsessed* with the idea that we could order and consume alcohol. We all did.

The German teenagers were drinking sodas. Most of them did not see the point in buying the more expensive alcoholic drinks.

Since it was a free and accepted, unrestricted, thing for them, they literally did not care about it.

This is the same thing--I really think if you make it a normal part of every day, that he can have it or not have it...you will find he forgets about it.
Or, even if you find he eats a handful of M&M's or a sucker or something *every day*, in the overall picture of his diet, it's NOT that bad. ESPECIALLY if it is really putting it in its place as a part of a healthy diet and making it not something worth obsessing about for him and gorging on if he gets a chance.

(I also don't favor unrestricted access for a young child. I don't think at 2 or 3 or 4 they even really connect getting sick with the act of eating too much candy yet.)
post #40 of 71
It sounds weird to list fruit as a sweet treat. To us fruit is food. It's to be eaten in moderation like all foods, but it's a food. I don't think that adding some fruit to breakfast takes the place of candy.

But, I understand where you're coming from. My sister has absolutely no sweet tooth. And it's very hard for her to understand what it's like to live with one.

I think I'm the opposite of a super taster. Everything I eat has to have bold flavors. I put salt and hot sauce on all my savory food. I put sugar (either white or honey) on my sweet food. I add maple syrup to vanilla ice cream. It's just how my tastebuds work. I taste food that other people eat with no alterations and have a hard time bringing myself to eat them. They are just so boring. Fruit is often bland and watery. I always sugar store bought berries and often dip store apples in things like peanut butter or nutella.

It's possible that at this point the only food your son has had that excites his taste buds is candy. I don't think I'd had spicy food until I was 6 or 7. You could try finding other foods with intense flavors like pickles or capers or olives.

I recently discovered seasoned rice wine vinegar and now sprinkle that on tomato slices and apple slices to make them taste like something to eat them.
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