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The Waldorf-Inspired Discussion Thread - Page 2

post #21 of 109
I think I belong here! I really love waldorf, but there are some bits we don't follow. Media for one. In theory, we would be computer and TV free, but the kids do some learning games they love on here, I need the interaction as I'm fairly cut off from society being in BFE, and I admit we have family movie nights and watch too much tv (but we don't have cable) compared to what I know is right. But changing old habits is hard!

Anthroposophy also doesn't sit entirely right with me. I'm not Christian, so that's not the problem, but reading through some of the books with the spiritual aspect seems a bit weird to my own religious thoughts.

We try to create a good routine, but often it fails and I'm not the best GD'er there ever was, but I try.

Also-natural toys. I would just die to have just natural "real" toys in my house. But with my in-laws, it's never going to happen. I am constantly battling the plastic monster and the commercialism. We do have some I approve of, though-legos, magnetix, etc.

We were supposed to go to the Apple Orchard today, but it's raining, so we are going to try and if not we will go next week.
post #22 of 109
wow the grain grinding sounds lovely!! So does gathering apples. We went on a walk in the woods today, we gathered nuts and berries and pretended we were hunter gathers, making traps etc.. The woods end in a bech where we threw stones into the water and had a snack and some hot chocolate. We found lots of bits of sea glass, which we gathered and have brought home to wash and play with as pirates treasure. We played with stones and made 'dinner' with shell tea sets and pebbles which we left in a wee tiny cave which dd said was an elf home. She also found a stone, long with a knobby bit at the end, she called this 'stone child' and says it looks like an angel. That's come home with us along with loads of leaves and twigs that we intend to make a big autumn picture out of.
We've just made bramble and apple tartlets which we'll have with dinner later and now she's off out to play with the neighbours while ds sleeps. Bliss full day really!
Hope you all had equally lovely days.
loving this thread Laura x
post #23 of 109
I love hearing everyones thoughts on waldorf and how they use it! I posted pictures of our play area a week or so ago on my blog here http://autumnadventures.wordpress.com/

Laura, i would love to hear more about living in cork and how natural family friendly it is. I have never been, but it for some reason is at the top of the places I would love to live or at least visit for an extended amount of time list.
post #24 of 109
Hi everyone!

My intro: I live in the midwest and have 4 children, ages 14, 11, 3, and 1. I'm a SAHM and we are Waldorf-inspired.

I can get into: natural toys, nature tables, the emphasis on nature and rhythms, seasonal celebrations, etc. I firmly believe that our youngest two children benefit each and every day from our waldorf-inspired choices.

I just can't believe in: the whole anthroposophy ball

I have to be honest and say that most of waldorf's educational practices don't work for us either. We started exploring Montessori for that earlier this year and I've been very happy doing things that way.
post #25 of 109
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mariew View Post
I love hearing everyones thoughts on waldorf and how they use it! I posted pictures of our play area a week or so ago on my blog here http://autumnadventures.wordpress.com/

Laura, i would love to hear more about living in cork and how natural family friendly it is. I have never been, but it for some reason is at the top of the places I would love to live or at least visit for an extended amount of time list.
I am totally envious of your beautiful wooden floors. I wish we could have those, but as we rent an apt. we have no say in the matter. Bah.

I saw you made some beeswax tapers. We've done votives because I'm not sure how to dip tapers. Is it easy?
post #26 of 109
Oh, tapers are super easy! I got a wax melting pot at michaels so that I'd have a tall thin pot for melting wax so that I wouldn't have to melt so much. Then I tied cotton wick onto a coat hanger and started dipping them one or two at a time into the melted wax. usually by the time I got through all of them on the hanger the first ones were ready to dip again but if they were still a little gooey I would just hang them up for a couple seconds. Then just stop dipping when they are as thick as you want. I make them while I'm doing something else like making the bread I made that day so that I can alternate wait times and not have any time just standing there waiting.

Yeah, our floors need refinished but we love them anyway. Wood floors were a requirement for me when we bought our house because my dad is a carpenter who specializes in wood floors and I know how awesome they are
post #27 of 109
Great Thread!!!!

We will join this wonderful crowd of Waldorf inspired. Currently my almost 5yo dd1 is in her third year at a Waldorf preschool. It is so wonderful and feel lucky to be there. DD2 will go once she gets old enough. Now that we have started with some alternative schooling I'm having a hard time wanting dd1 to go to public school. So we are still in the process of considering waldorf inspired homeschool.

Things that I love are the natural toys, the colors, the seasons and celebrations, the Elsa Beskow books . Most of all just how it makes me feel. I feel so calm and connected and like I'm doing the right thing. I love that my daughter wants me to tell her stories all the time (though she wants a "story from your heart about a worm"). Also the nature connection. DD is interested in rocks, mushrooms, loves to see gnomes in a garden and wear "fairy dust".

Some things that I'm not so good at....rhythm, ugh, just having a hard time with that one. I work random days, so it makes it a bit tough. Also the other big one is TV. I didn't get to see too much growing up and now LOVe it. So I do let dd watch it more than I should (um like when I want to just sleep 5 more minutes ). In the Kindergarten snack book I found a few things odd, like for them not to eat too many eggs b/c of the connection to fertility and stuff like that.

All in all, I really love it and enjoy reading about Waldorf.

Here are some pics of dd's room where toys are kept
http://www.flickr.com/photos/34213372@N02/3940047970/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/34213372@N02/3940029600/

dd's bed area
http://www.flickr.com/photos/34213372@N02/3940046562/

Then a random picture...I was eco and wrapped dd2's birthday gifts in fabric. Not totally fancy but it's ok...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/34213372@N02/3940030758/
post #28 of 109
We'd definitely be more in the "Waldorf-inspired" crowd. I really like a number of things about Waldorf - even the educational aspects of it. However, I am unable to accept the anthroposophical underpinings. For instance:

-We really like wet-on-wet watercolor, but I don't believe it's a spiritual practice. It's just really fun!
-We practice delayed education, but it's not because I think the child is in a "dream state" or that it has anything to do with their soul. We just really believe that it's important for children to have a childhood and appreciate that Waldorf trends the same way.
-We may work on keeping los warm, but again it's more of a practical issue than a spiritual one. We work on doing that in our own way, though, as the woolens are a bit out of our price range.
-etc

I tend to believe that Steiner was able to key in on some things that are generally true about children and the way they develop. He may have placed spiritual language/meanings with them, but that doesn't mean that just because I may agree with them that I also have to have those same beliefs. I had a tough time with this at first, but am finding it easier for me to make that distinction.

That's one of the things I like the most about being a homeschooler - greater flexibility in what I accept. We're also skipping a number of the traditional festivals. They don't jive with us so we're going to do our own instead. I suppose as time goes on we might look more Waldorf on the outside than if one were to go on a philosophical/beliefs basis, if that makes sense.
post #29 of 109
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Izzysmom View Post
Oh, mama! Where did you get that delicious wooden basket beside your dd's kitchen??? I love it!
post #30 of 109
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pampered_mom View Post
We'd definitely be more in the "Waldorf-inspired" crowd. I really like a number of things about Waldorf - even the educational aspects of it. However, I am unable to accept the anthroposophical underpinings. For instance:

-We really like wet-on-wet watercolor, but I don't believe it's a spiritual practice. It's just really fun!
-We practice delayed education, but it's not because I think the child is in a "dream state" or that it has anything to do with their soul. We just really believe that it's important for children to have a childhood and appreciate that Waldorf trends the same way.
-We may work on keeping los warm, but again it's more of a practical issue than a spiritual one. We work on doing that in our own way, though, as the woolens are a bit out of our price range.
-etc

I tend to believe that Steiner was able to key in on some things that are generally true about children and the way they develop. He may have placed spiritual language/meanings with them, but that doesn't mean that just because I may agree with them that I also have to have those same beliefs. I had a tough time with this at first, but am finding it easier for me to make that distinction.

That's one of the things I like the most about being a homeschooler - greater flexibility in what I accept. We're also skipping a number of the traditional festivals. They don't jive with us so we're going to do our own instead. I suppose as time goes on we might look more Waldorf on the outside than if one were to go on a philosophical/beliefs basis, if that makes sense.
This is totally us, as well!
post #31 of 109
No time now, but subbing. Will come read and post later. Great thread though!
post #32 of 109
Thread Starter 
I need y'all's advice. I'm in the process of planning out a gnome playmat set for dd for winter (we have a table in our den that I periodically make new playmats for, and this year I'm going to do a new one for each season. I'd like to do a gnome set since in the winter we focus on seeds sleeping beneath the earth and the gnomes getting everything ready for springtime rebirth, like polishing the metals and minerals in the ground, etc.). I'd rather not have to make the gnomes myself since I'm already going to have to make the playmat. I've found several different sets of gnomes that I wanted your opinion on. I'm posting here rather than in the main Waldorf forum because some are more "natural" than others but I don't want that to be deciding factor. I'd like to go with ones that will get played with the most, not necessarily the ones that are closest to a Waldorf ideal, if that makes sense.

Here are the options I'm considering so far:

http://www.etsy.com/shop.php?user_id=7850548

I like that these are made of cloth (I'm always looking to diversify the media our toys are constructed from). I like that they are affordable and look realisitic.

http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php..._desc&includes[]=tags&includes[]=title

This is more traditionally Waldorf and the plus side is that it can also be a puzzle.

http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php..._desc&includes[]=tags&includes[]=title

These are just too cute. They are a bit small though. I do like that I could get a lot for $25.

http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php..._desc&includes[]=tags&includes[]=title

I'm not sure how big these are but it would be nice to have the little house that comes with them to use for something else.

http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php..._desc&includes[]=tags&includes[]=title

I like the colors and beard used on these.


http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php..._desc&includes[]=tags&includes[]=title

Pricey but whimsicle.

http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php..._desc&includes[]=tags&includes[]=title

I like the natural feel of these.

http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php..._desc&includes[]=tags&includes[]=title

This is just for one gnome but the price is nice.

http://www.heartwoodarts.com/product...gnomehouse.jpg

I love these but they are quite pricey.

So, which do you like best? Any other suggestions?
post #33 of 109
post #34 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuxPerpetua View Post
Oh, mama! Where did you get that delicious wooden basket beside your dd's kitchen??? I love it!
It was a good find at Ross!! I love it but the girls colored one side with a permanent marker
post #35 of 109
What a great thread!

I'm Sage and I have two little boys,4, and 15 months, and an 8 year old dss. I'm a sahm and my dh is a carpenter. We live in a little house we built with just enough property for gardens and. We're very environmentally and socially conscious, and we're trying to raise our children to love and respect the natural world as well as their fellow human beings. I'm not sure "waldorf-inspired" is the right description, but there is definitely a lot about Waldorf I love.

I love the slower pace and focus on home/family life Waldorf encourages. We have a nice daily rhythm; lots and lots of outdoor time; and natural, handmade, and imaginative toys. In our home work is met with reverence. My dh and I are both creative people so in addition to painting, drawing, and music making there is usually some other kind of crafty endeavor happening. We acknowledge and celebrate the seasons in all kinds of ways.

But, we read books, a lot. My ds is learning to read and I'm encouraging that. We listen to recorded music, frequently. The bigger boys watch a couple dvds each week. We don't do gnomes and fairies. I provide the boys with the opportunity to use Montessori style manipulatives. I do a lot of handwork but my kids do almost none. How and what they paint/draw/sculpt is up to them.

I think Steiner hit on some key components of ideal child development, but I disagree with many of his fundamental ideas. We don't practice any particular religion - we're agnostic "free thinkers" - but I do feel like I have a spirtual life. It's just not an anthroposophical one.
post #36 of 109
post #37 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by SageR View Post

But, we read books, a lot. My ds is learning to read and I'm encouraging that. We listen to recorded music, frequently. The bigger boys watch a couple dvds each week. We don't do gnomes and fairies. I provide the boys with the opportunity to use Montessori style manipulatives. I do a lot of handwork but my kids do almost none. How and what they paint/draw/sculpt is up to them.

I think Steiner hit on some key components of ideal child development, but I disagree with many of his fundamental ideas. We don't practice any particular religion - we're agnostic "free thinkers" - but I do feel like I have a spirtual life. It's just not an anthroposophical one.
We also read a lot of books and listen to CDs a lot-books on CD, music, etc. The last two sentences I bolded because that's pretty much how I feel, too.
post #38 of 109
post #39 of 109
Thread Starter 
Oh, shoot . . . the links didn't work. Would you mind resposting? I would really love to know your thoughts.
post #40 of 109
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