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Visiting friends for the weekend who eat very unhealthy - Page 3

post #41 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by elisent View Post
Oh, that's too bad about the Jiffy Pop I didn't know that! We've been buying it for family movie night once a week recently. Our microwave doesn't turn anymore so popcorn burns in there, and my flat top stove got scratched when I tried to make real popcorn on it because none of my pans are smooth on the bottom. I guess we're back to no popcorn then.
According to the nutrition information link someone posted upthread, the Jiffy Pop brand offers several versions of their popcorn, including 94% fat free ones, 100-calorie ones, etc. So I bet if you scan the shelves you'll find one that works for you. And really, once a week, divided up among a whole family, is probably fine anyway.
post #42 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by JennTheMomma View Post
Well, I wouldn't be able to let it go, especially the hot dogs. I would call them ahead of time and say that some of the foods they eat you and your kids don't eat/like and ask if they have any alternatives, or if you could buy some groceries once you get there and ask to store them in the fridge. I know its only a weekend, but it could make your kids sick if they don't have this type of food, I know it would make me sick with my sensative stomach and being sensative to artificial foods.
You would really do that? Wow, if someone that I was going to have as a guest called and said that to me I'd be majorly offended.

OP if I were you I would either let it go for the weekend or bring a cooler like everyone has suggested with some healthy foods and make up an excuse about why you brought it. Maybe just to help out maybe you have really picky eaters. I would not say "We don't like the foods you eat" to me that just sounds like you were keeping track of what they eat and it sounds really judgemental.

Best of luck.
post #43 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by elisent View Post
Oh, that's too bad about the Jiffy Pop I didn't know that!
Jiffy Pop (the stovetop version) has three grams of transfats per serving not thirteen. http://www.conagra.com/consumer/bran...page=jiffy_pop
post #44 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by chaoticzenmom View Post
It must be like a peanut butter soda.
LOL, I'm trying to decide whether that sounds good or not! I've had chocolate soda and liked it.

Seriously, jiffy pop is awesome though--so fun to make. I should introduce DS to it, I don't think he's ever had it.
post #45 of 86
My dd would be a wreck if she ate like that for a whole weekend. I will sometimes let her have a junkfood hotdog or junkie mac N cheese at a house we are visiting.
I do have an excuse--dd is a mess after and people can see it.
I don't have a problem with natural sugar treats. She doesn't get them everyday but I don't stress about those ones. For me, and her, it's the dyes and artificial stuff.
post #46 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by StrawberryFields View Post
Like others mentioned I would probably just stop at the grocery store and bring some things. A grocery bag with a loaf of bread, butter, syrup, fruit, a block of cheese, some already popped popcorn or Pirate's Booty for treats, some lunch food, etc. Then I would just say something like, "Thank you so much for hosting our family this weekend!! We stopped at the grocery store and grabbed some food to help take some of the burden off of you. I would be happy to prepare (breakfast, lunch, dinner, etc) on (this day)! We are so excited to see you guys. If there is anything else I can do to help just let me know!"
I like the tone of this - but I would tell the hostess PRIOR to arriving - as otherwise she would have bought enough food for all of you for all meals - some of which will be wasted. Whether someone else thinks it is junky food or not, they still will have put money out for it.

I am firmly in the camp of suck it up for one weekend if you can't find a polite way to bring a BIT (not a lot, a lot would be rude) of food. The only thing in the list that the OP stated that would bother me is the sugar-free syrup. One, fake sugar is carcinogenic IMO, and two, it just tastes awful.

I think I'd call the hostess and thank her for having you, so excited to spend the weekend together, etc and say that you're bringing some snack items since she is providing meals. Then bring fruit and whatever snack items you want - and a bottle of syrup that you can say "is just our favorite; I couldn't pass up the opportunity to share it with you since you mentioned a pancake breakfast".
post #47 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by elisent View Post
Oh, that's too bad about the Jiffy Pop I didn't know that! We've been buying it for family movie night once a week recently. Our microwave doesn't turn anymore so popcorn burns in there, and my flat top stove got scratched when I tried to make real popcorn on it because none of my pans are smooth on the bottom. I guess we're back to no popcorn then.
You could also try this. It works wonderfully!
post #48 of 86
If I couldn't go and be cheerful and polite about the food served in the house, I'd stay at a motel or I'd stay home. It really is only one weekend.
post #49 of 86
I'd worry about tummy aches. I think it's a great idea to bring something with you, so your children can have something nutritious in their stomachs.
post #50 of 86
I wouldn't say anything negative to my friend about the food she serves -- i.e. asking for alternatives seems a little demanding. But then I speak from the perspective of being lower income.

We sometimes have great intentions for cooking special foods for coming visitors -- then at the last minute realize we forgot to subtract something or an emergency comes up, and we have negative balance, or a lot less than we thought we did, and have no money for the special stuff we wanted to buy.

So we serve our friends whatever we have in the house. It would feel overwhelming if they were, like, what alternatives do you have?

That said, I have one child who's a rather picky eater. So if we were visiting friends out of town, we'd probably tell them not to take it personally if she didn't want whatever they were serving ... plus with her, you can't always even be sure she will like what she normally likes, because when it's served she may decide she's not in the mood.

So we would probably bring some food ourselves, both to share with everyone as well as to provide some alternatives for our choosy child.

I don't think it's rude to bring some food to share with everyone ... at least I've never had any hostess act like this was a problem to have more stuff for everyone to snack on. The more food the more fun.
post #51 of 86
Our family would not be able to "suck it up" and eat that stuff for a whole weekend. We would all be constipated wrecks and dd would be so wired the entire weekend that our hosts would probably kick us out Seriously. When grandma insists on feeding dd brownies and hot chocolate for breakfast she turns into a monster I do not recognize.....and that is with healthy food for the rest of the day. It takes a full week to "fix" her.

But I think there are lots of good suggestions for ways to get around things, bring "gifts", and treat everyone to a dinner out or whatever. How well do you know these people? If you are really close, I think being delicately honest before you show up is best. Explain that your kids do not do well with certain foods and offer to bring alternatives. If you do not know them well enough to do that, perhaps you could become "vegetarians" for the weekend to avoid some of the really gross stuff (hot dogs) and just minimize the other stuff.

We have a similar problem when visiting my mom. It is not as bad because we stay in a hotel and we can all eat there then eat far less of the offending foods when with her. We also take everyone out for at least one meal....more if we can get away with it. But in some ways it is "worse" because not only is the food unhealthy but she has a hard time managing her food (and the rest of her life) so she is often dishing up stuff that is ROTTEN Like, her power went out for a WEEK once, and she did not throw out the food in her fridge! I have to be extremely vigilant because dd is too young to understand this and grandma will try to feed her stuff on the sly. Obviously, the whole situation is part of a much bigger problem but we just do not see a fix at this point. So, we are often snarfing food in the car on the way there and politely declining the ravioli with mold on it
post #52 of 86
I often bring individual, or large boxed Annie's Mac & Cheese when we visit people. It's a treat for dd, and pretty "normal". Something like that could sneak into a lot of meals without being pushy or anything.
Most people usually dig pizza and salad - you could suggest making some at home or picking it up for everyone.

We have to balance our stuff like that otherwise all of us have digestive issues. . . so we wouldn't do a whole weekend of eating like that, and so, we sorta always end up bringing or making tons of food when we visit people (plus we love to cook, anyway ).
post #53 of 86
Yooper, not to take things OT -- but I'm wondering if your mom and my mom are the same age? My mom was born in 1925 to a family that was already poor and then of course they lived through the Great Depression. It pains her to throw ANYTHING away.
post #54 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by elisent View Post
Oh, that's too bad about the Jiffy Pop I didn't know that! We've been buying it for family movie night once a week recently. Our microwave doesn't turn anymore so popcorn burns in there, and my flat top stove got scratched when I tried to make real popcorn on it because none of my pans are smooth on the bottom. I guess we're back to no popcorn then.
You can make popcorn in a regular pan by keeping it slightly elevated over the heat source. That's what I always did as a kid. That way, it can't scratch your stove top.
post #55 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammal_mama View Post
Yooper, not to take things OT -- but I'm wondering if your mom and my mom are the same age? My mom was born in 1925 to a family that was already poor and then of course they lived through the Great Depression. It pains her to throw ANYTHING away.
She is a bit younger than that but did grow up very poor. This issue and others related to it developed over time. She was pretty "normal" when I was growing up. And while never the world's "cleanest" cook, things were OK then. Now she lives alone and has hoarding/cleanliness/hygiene issues. I have analyzed this to no end with my sister and we have yet to figure it out, although I do suspect having a distant past of being poor contributes to it. It is like she does not notice or something. Every time we point out that something has mold on it, smells off, or is WAY past the expiration date, she gets very angry. So we quit doing that. It is so goofy. If we are around other people and decline to eat something, she will go on and on about how we eat like birds (or some other story) even though we KNOW she knows why we are not eating it and that we certainly do NOT eat like birds in any other venue except her house. Things came to a similar "head" when we came to the decision that clearing enough space to sleep on the floor in her packed-to-the-gills-and-very-dirty-cat-pee-filled-3600-square-foot house was not going to happen anymore and that we needed to stay in a hotel..... She was very angry and now makes up these elaborate stories to others as to why we do not stay there. Something flipped in her brain some time ago and it appears to be permanent
post #56 of 86
oh yikes. that would be hard for me to let go.

when i visit my brother (whose child eats pudding snacks for breakfast...and has to "finish it" before he can have an oreo) i usually buy things to make a big salad which i eat along with whatever type of weird meat he is barbecuing. (he only eats meat that he grills. it's very weird) but for my dd...she is just now becoming aware of a whole world of "food" that i don't want her to have! even if it is just one weekend...i don't really want to set that precedent. and i feel like i can respect my brother's right to only eat grilled meat and feed his kid chocolate only (i don't really respect it actually, but i don't try to change it) and when he comes to my house, i don't try to feed him like, vegan food or something.

i would: offer to cook meals, go out to eat, supplement whatever meals and snacks with normal food that you provide

good luck!
post #57 of 86
Quote:
I wouldn't say anything negative to my friend about the food she serves -- i.e. asking for alternatives seems a little demanding. But then I speak from the perspective of being lower income.
i'm fairly low income. however, i provide my family and guests with real food. if i were a guest in someone's home, i would not necessarily ask for alternatives, but contribute something to the meal.
post #58 of 86
I'd let it go, but seriously consider bringing maple syrup as a gift... Most people do love it, just don't/can't justify the cost (and neither could I if I bought it in the store - but I buy it from a local place for $25 a gallon every winter
post #59 of 86
I don't think it's obnoxious to bring food as long as you bring enough for everyone. If they like popcorn, bring some coconut oil and some kernels and teach them the best way to make it (on the stove ). If they like hot dogs, bring some nitrate free ones. Same with the syrup. Tell them you didn't want to put them out and wanted a way to thank them for having you so you're helping them with their food budget for the weekend by bringing some yummy treats.
post #60 of 86
The hot dogs and aspartame would be a no go for me. I'd rather starve.

I like the idea of grocery shopping and preparing food while you are there. It seems like a nice gesture since they are letting you stay in their home. What about going out to eat for a couple meals? That way everyone can choose what they order.

Air popper's are pretty cheap - I think we paid like $15 or so for ours - and kernals are even cheaper. That might be a nice gift.
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