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your baby can read? really?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
id love to hear thoughts and experiences people have had with this!

also-my daughter is 27 months, is this for younger kids?
post #2 of 22
I have a friend who purchased the set for her 2 year ols, and she does not like it(why watch tv to read), but she loves the flashcards which I think are AWESOME. They are made of heavy cardstock and slide open to reveal the picture of the featured word. I was tempted to purchase YBCR ONLY for the flashcards.

My friend has boys that are 10 and 12 and she taught them to read using Frontline Phonics at the age of 2 1/2 to 3. Needless to say she is dumping YBCR and going back to the Frontline since it worked well for her boys.
post #3 of 22
If you do a search on this there are alot of threads.
I really dislike programs like your baby can read. Can't think of anything constructive to say so...
post #4 of 22
They say in the ads that it's for kids up to (or possibly through) 5.

I personally started reading at 2, read out loud from the newspaper and scared my mom, but I don't think it has helped me AT ALL in life. Probably made my eyes bad, or at least made them bad more quickly than they would have been.

And even though I was one of those kids (though I just did it, no teaching involved), those ads creep me out a bit...it's just not something I find easy to see/hear...no wonder it scared my mom when I did it.
post #5 of 22
why does a 2yo need to read?

Best way of promoting reading is to read lots to your child and as they get a bit older, point to the words as you read.

I don't think ANY school expects a child to be able to read anything other than their name.
post #6 of 22
I agree with the pp. As a mother, I find the idea of plunking your small child in front of the TV for any purpose, reading or otherwise, to be disturbing. And as an educator, I can guarantee that learning to recognize sight words (or just memorizing) is not the same thing as learning to read. I really dislike this program and feel like it should be banned. As pp said, children should learn to read naturally by being read to. The first step of learning to read is learning "print concepts" which are such things as the words going from left to right, top of the page to bottom, etc. The TV and flashcards don't reinforce those most basic concepts.
post #7 of 22
ok im gonna be the odd ball out. But i got this for ds after he was a yr old. he doesnt really like the dvds only because its not capture his attention since there are not a lot of cartoons but the flash cards are great. He begs me to do the flash cards with him. I honestly thing its how you teach your child. sure you could teach them to memorize as other posters have mentioned or you could actually read them the words, show them the letters and how to sound it out and then they have the pictures that go along with the words. DS has learned how to recognize words that I write down from the flash cards. I would recommend this. Maybe you dont want to buy the dvds but on ebay or craigslist you can pretty much build your own set and not pay full price.
post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by chick View Post
why does a 2yo need to read?

Best way of promoting reading is to read lots to your child and as they get a bit older, point to the words as you read.

I don't think ANY school expects a child to be able to read anything other than their name.
I was one of those children who could ready by 2 1/2, and and een now I can remember the pride that I felt in my accomplishments and the independence that I gained from knowing how to read, and count money. Maybe a child does not need to read, but for me it allowed me to walk to the corner store (diagonal from my grandparents family home) fill in the blanks on the invitations for my fifth birthday party, assist the children in my kindergarten class when the teacher was working with other children, read to myself, read billboards and cereal boxes (i think that I honed my reading skill by reading food packaging) basically I could do anything. Or so I thought that I could.

I don't know if teachers expect a child to read, but it made life easier for me. I could read the instructions on work sheets, I could read ahead in books while others were waiting for assistance and many other tasks that werenot required. I love reading just as much now as I did then, if not more.
post #9 of 22
I think that if you follow your child's level of interest and don't push anything on him/her you can't go wrong. Show her some letters and if she expresses interest, then teach her the sounds. If she doesn't seem especially interested, don't press it. Wait for her to ask. Children have an instinct for when they need to learn certain things and part of our job is to pay attention and provide what they need when they're ready, not before. While some children are ready to start reading at 2 or 3, you're not doing your child a service by drilling them in literacy skills early on. I'm convinced that there is no real benefit to learning to read that early. But more than that I have a faith and respect in a child's own drive to learn and explore. Follow their lead and you'll be helping to foster a life-long joy and excitment for learning.
post #10 of 22
Thread Starter 
my toddler has been interested in books, ever since she was a small baby-we read to her all day long, and she hangs out with her books all the time, they are one of her favorite toys/things to play with.

i'm really interested in personal experiences with the program or other similar programs.

im not opposed to her watching a learning dvd, she already gets a lot of learning out of dora and sesame street and thanks to them has great number recognition and can count two five in spanish, im ok with learning using audio visual media.
post #11 of 22
Just wondering... why do you want your child to learn to read so early?

Is she taking an active interest in learning reading and asking you about the letters and their sounds?
post #12 of 22
I bought it for Levi about a month ago (he is 26months) and its the only tv he watches (20min a day, in about 2-3 sessions not all at once, he watches while he has breakfast and again in the afternoon when we get home from errands or whatever)

He LOVES the flashcards (the sliding ones), and the regular ones too. I got it because he is obsessed with reading, doesnt want to learn his letters, but loves books of all kinds, and is constantly asking 'whats that say?'

I was reading at age 2, and it was a BIG advantage through school having a high reading level and loving to read instead of being tortured by it (like my sister was/is still as a college student).

I dont get why it would be a bad thing to teach them when they are little, it just makes it easier when they get older, like learning baby sign language or a foreign language its just another form of communication.

I see it kinda like how I potty trained him starting at 8months too, and he was out of diapers by 15months, never had to deal with a potty battle, do all the reward charts, accidents and all that, I just made it part of his life from early on and he just accepted that. I think introducing reading, numbers, colors, science, etc. now is a good thing so that I dont have to start all that when he is already in school and learning a whole bunch of other things too - I have time now, and its something fun to do!
post #13 of 22
I got this for ds around the time he turned one. A friend gave me a box of baby stuff and the videos and flash cards were in there. I turned on the video for in (the first he had ever watched) one day in a desperate attempt to be able to take a shower in piece. Now I let him watch one of the videos once a day in the morning while I get ready. We also do the flash cards whenever he asks (which is often--he loves them), and we ready books all the time. He loves the songs on the videos and almost immediately learned body parts, colors, etc. from the videos. He has always been really into books and letters. He now knows all of his letters by name and most of them by sound. He recognizes some words that he sees often in his books and likes to read the letters he sees all over town. He is not reading...not that I feel he should be...but he likes it and I think it has encouraged him to understand that letters make words, and helped peek his curiosity about the whole thing, which is cool I think.

Mostly, like I said I used it to get 20 min for myself in the mornings to make myself feel human again after nursing all night, and I think as far as videos go it is better than a lot of other things you could show your kid. My ds enjoys it.
post #14 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anandamama View Post
Just wondering... why do you want your child to learn to read so early?

Is she taking an active interest in learning reading and asking you about the letters and their sounds?
well...first, I haven't necessarily said that i want her to learn to read right now. I have seen the commercial several times in the last few days and that has made me curious about peoples experiences with it.

also-I was an early reader. a very early reader, in fact so early that i don't remember the actual learning, i just remember when i was 3 and reading ameila bedelia books already...and i always had a positive experience as an early reader-books were a great friend to me all during my childhood and beyond. i find great comfort in books and reading.

as to your question about her interest-she carries books with her all over the house, asks to be read to all day long (im talking like an average of 20 books a day) and 'reads' the books to herself based on her memory and telling herself a story also based on the pictures. she recognizes letters and repeats the sound when we talk about them (her two older sisters are readers and they read to her as well, and teach her about sounding out letters and words-she retains quite a lot of this info)

she counts numbers, has started counting to five in spanish thanks to dora (She tries to go to 10, but switches her numbers after 6 and 7) and has the same incredible retention for music lyrics as my middle daughter. she really impresses me with her clear desire to learn...not just sounds and reading, but trying to learn the order of things, learning motor skills like drawing certain shapes, figures, etc...her desire to model her older siblings actions, her attention to detail in the kitchen when i am cooking, etc.

as for doing something like your baby can read? well i dont know. first the price is completely out of my range, so i would have to torrent the files (they are all over the internet) i also know that im not sure that i want to do something super structured and time consuming, not because of my lack of commitment, but because i like the routine we have now with lots of freeplay and exploration, and she initiates so much reading time on her own right now anyway.

so anyway...there you have it.
post #15 of 22
Honestly, these things don't teach your kid to read. They teach them to memorize pictures and shapes and echo back what they are. Real reading is a lot more complex than that. It involves a cognitive shift and ability to engage in abstract thing, decoding skills, understanding the relationship between letters and sounds.

An early reader is going to be an early reader. I was an early reader. I taught myself when I was three. But it wasn't because someone sat me in front of a television or handed me flash cards. It was because I was in a print rich environment with people who cared enough to talk to me, play language games with me, read to me. That's what makes a reader, IME.

There are so many developmentally appropriate skills a toddler needs to learn, skills that will help them have success in reading when they are actually read for it. And I really believe those early reading skills are best learned through loving interactions with a caregiver, not artificially through flashcards and drills and videos.
post #16 of 22
My understanding is that there aren’t a lot of controlled studies on how early reading affect literacy later on. So you just have to go with what feels right to you as a parent. I was a late reader and I have a reading disability (more here if you are interested). It was very frustrating and humiliating for me. So I personally feel it is important to expose my children to reading early.

OP, I think that this video is designed for younger children. But if you are allowing your DD to watch videos anyway this one is worth checking out from the library. It is like a home movie (some review it as unprofessional) but also that means no animation and no rapidly changing imagery. IMO this is part of it’s appeal. I saw the early learning workshop by the guy that created these videos. They use whole word method to teach reading, and it’s my understanding that is best suited for ages up to 2 years.

Have you started introducing phonics to her? I think this would be a better use of your time and money.

I have to go now, just very busy and not enough time to type everything. If you like I am willing to discuss this with you further over the phone; just PM me. If you are in the US I can even call you.
post #17 of 22
I would just read a LOT to your child. Going to the library and picking out books and playing with the puppets and in the garden... and then taking a huge stack of books home! That's good times. If you want to do something fun and more targeted, try Starfall.com. My DD has loved that since she saw me checking it out a year ago. She's always been obsessed with letters and words so we certainly did write words out for her on card stock (so she wouldn't destroy them, after we tried that and kept rewriting words for her for a while), which I suppose are flashcards, and she would beg us to teach words to her, but it was just a game. It does let you look at the letters and phonics I suppose. Anyway, the program I've seen on TV seems pretty pointless for all that money, and it just makes me worry because of how early instruction in reading can actually hurt academic performance later... you just have to follow your child, though. If you are just following their interests and not pushing it AT ALL, I think some looking at letters and words, even at a young age, can be fun.
post #18 of 22
I read a lot to my daughter, and she now at 28 months is starting to enjoy chapter books in addition to her "baby" books.

She is really facinated by letters and enjoys matching them up. One day I wrote a few words on cards to see if she could match them... just out of curiousity. Anyways it turned out she remembered the words and now can "read" about 15 words. She really enjoys having me write words on cue cards, then she decorates them and cuts them up.

I guess I also do a tiny bit of phonics with her. Nothing formal but it just works it's way into our conversation.

Anyways... I would recommend just following your childs lead. Come up with your own "program" and do what interests your LO.
post #19 of 22
My two cents:
Almost everything offered in an infomercial is a bunch of hooey. Especially products for babies. KWIM?

My 24 month old knows the alphabet - he can pick out the letters and knows what sound they make. I work with him every day using sidewalk chalk or his big alphabet poster. We make it fun and he has no idea he is "learning" - we are just playing. I think thats the way to go!
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by annettemarie View Post
Honestly, these things don't teach your kid to read. They teach them to memorize pictures and shapes and echo back what they are. Real reading is a lot more complex than that. It involves a cognitive shift and ability to engage in abstract thing, decoding skills, understanding the relationship between letters and sounds.

An early reader is going to be an early reader. I was an early reader. I taught myself when I was three. But it wasn't because someone sat me in front of a television or handed me flash cards. It was because I was in a print rich environment with people who cared enough to talk to me, play language games with me, read to me. That's what makes a reader, IME.

There are so many developmentally appropriate skills a toddler needs to learn, skills that will help them have success in reading when they are actually read for it. And I really believe those early reading skills are best learned through loving interactions with a caregiver, not artificially through flashcards and drills and videos.
I totally agree.

I'd just add that kids learn best when they learn in their own way and in their own time. Products like these are not designed to take anything about your child or your child's needs into account; they are designed, to put it bluntly, to have an obvious, visible result that will convince parents to buy it.

I am thinking of a video of an elephant painting that I saw recently. Yes, it is amazing that an elephant can be taught to paint. Certainly. But does the elephant's ability to remember the precise brush strokes it was taught mean that it is able to identify the picture it paints? Does learning this mean that it will someday be able to paint something of its own choosing? And most importantly, does this skill have any benefit to the elephant, other than the dubious benefit of making it a tourist attraction?
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