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Throwing candy away - Page 6

post #101 of 275
EnviroBecca, I am being quite serious when I say that that is great. But I would bet good money that 90% of the posters decrying the waste of candy are not as conscientious as you.

Are all of you who think this is so horrible doing everything possible to eliminate food and packaging waste elsewhere? Yes, EnviroBecca is, but what about the rest? Do you go to fast food restaurants? Do you get take-out? Do you buy disposable items for parties? How is your child's lunch packaged? Do you compost? What percentage of your groceries are not packaged?

I still maintain that what is really getting people riled is not the waste of food or packaging, but the perception of rudeness/entitledness that comes of accepting a gift and throwing it out. I sort of get that, but I really, really think the waste issue is a red herring, and that part of giving is accepting that the recipient may not use or "appreciate" your gift as you might like.

I wonder what you all think about crap plastic goody bag junk? Can I throw that away? I mean, it is JUNK. I would be embarrassed to donate that to a shelter.

Actually, we managed to leave without the goodie bag at one recent party. It was intentional on my part, but the goods had already been bought, so... (We don't do goodie bags at our own parties. Absolutely not.)
post #102 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by loraxc View Post
EnviroBecca, I am being quite serious when I say that that is great. But I would bet good money that 90% of the posters decrying the waste of candy are not as conscientious as you.

Are all of you who think this is so horrible doing everything possible to eliminate food and packaging waste elsewhere? Yes, EnviroBecca is, but what about the rest? Do you go to fast food restaurants? Do you get take-out? Do you buy disposable items for parties? How is your child's lunch packaged? Do you compost? What percentage of your groceries are not packaged?
I'm not as conscientious as EnviroBecca, but I do make a serious effort to reduce and eliminate packaging and waste.

Quote:
I still maintain that what is really getting people riled is not the waste of food or packaging, but the perception of rudeness/entitledness that comes of accepting a gift and throwing it out.
I don't see this as the same thing as a gift. People go trick-or-treating. This is a socially sanctioned (maybe the only socially sanctioned) way of asking for a gift. People deliberately knock on doors to ask for candy - because we all know that's what the vast majority of people hand out - then throw that candy away. I can't even wrap my brain around that. I'm not talking about a few dregs at the bottom of the bag that nobody likes and they didn't get eaten and then went stale. I'm talking about planning to just throw it away when you go out to get it. That's what I thought was under discussion in the OP.

Quote:
I wonder what you all think about crap plastic goody bag junk? Can I throw that away?
Do you go to a party, and say "Hey - can I have a goody bag?" I'm guessing you don't. It's just not the same thing.
post #103 of 275
I'm sure everyone here does something that someone else here would consider wasteful. No one is perfect. That said, I think it's really strange to have kid's go out ToT with the intent of throwing most of the candy away. If I felt candy was that terrible, I would either find a different activity to do on Halloween or I would find something to do with the candy. I just don't get taking something you know full well you aren't going to use and think is complete crap just to throw it away. Now I'm not saying that I think it's evil to throw away a petrified piece of bubble gum or something but rather addressing the scenario in the OP.

Quote:
Originally Posted by loraxc View Post
Are all of you who think this is so horrible doing everything possible to eliminate food and packaging waste elsewhere?
I'm trying but in no way fully there. It's a process for me. It's hard to start living in a completely new way than how I was raised. I make small changes here and there. But I wouldn't take something I didn't want and thought had no value just to get it and then throw it away. That just seems deliberately wasteful to me, ykwim?

Quote:
Originally Posted by loraxc View Post
I wonder what you all think about crap plastic goody bag junk? Can I throw that away? I mean, it is JUNK. I would be embarrassed to donate that to a shelter.
We have a "salvage shed" at the recycling center. You can take pretty much any usable item there besides clothes. It's the best thing ever! And people take away like everything. They're like vultures . Pretty much everything I take is gone before I drive away. There is also a place here called the Scrap Exchange that takes pretty much anything that can be used in an art project. But honestly, I think any shelter that took in children would be thrilled to get those cheapo dollar store type items to provide a little diversion. I would just save up a decent amount and then take it in.
post #104 of 275
One of many things I have learned from MDC is how toxic it is to give a gift and not be able to let go of it afterwards. It brings such horrible emotions and energy to both the giver and receiver when that happens--and yet STILL it's not like it changes the control issue.

So to those who are shocked that someone could be a member of MDC for years and 'waste' candy or a gift--I ask you, how in the world could you read all these stories of family feuds over dispensation of gifts, ect, and not come to the conclusion that if you're GOING to give something then do everyone a favor and give it willingly, freely, and with no strings attached!!!

I cannot believe the amount of spite and anger over what other people do with their halloween candy. The reverse is also true--if you can't hack people not eating the candy you chose then don't hand it out!!

Do people really spend time being angry over this? Or is this riling up for the purposes of debate?

Let anyone who wants to ToT do so. Let anyone who does not want to not. Let anyone who wants to give out candy, broccoli, toys, stickers, juice boxes, whatever is legal to give out give it! Let anyone who wishes to take it take it. And let whatever happens after Halloween be the business of people in their own families.
post #105 of 275
Quote:
Let anyone who wants to ToT do so. Let anyone who does not want to not. Let anyone who wants to give out candy, broccoli, toys, stickers, juice boxes, whatever is legal to give out give it! Let anyone who wishes to take it take it. And let whatever happens after Halloween be the business of people in their own families.
This, and what Tigerchild said before, hits the nail on the head.

We may eventually go ToT because Ds may want to and will inevitably have to give away or discard some candy because of our vegan lifestyle. Oh well.
post #106 of 275
Storm Bride, I think maybe you are focusing on the "TorT is ASKING for something" aspect much more than I do, and even most young kids do. I don't think my DD thinks of it as going door to door requesting candy to be given to her. I think she sees it as an exciting ritual that mysteriously ends in candy. I don't even think most kids get the literal meaning of "trick or treat."

I think the goodie bag parallel holds. Many here are saying "Well, if you don't want the candy, then don't trick or treat." To me that makes as much sense as saying, "Well, if you don't want the goodie bag, don't go to the party." Just because you may not use the party favor/candy you are given doesn't mean you have to miss the whole event, in my book!

We really don't TorT for the candy here. I mean, a little bit, but till she was 4 we didn't even show DD the candy and she was thrilled, THRILLED to TorT. It's about the fun of the costume and showing it off, the excitement of being out after in the mysterious after-dark world, the strangeness of knocking at unknown doors, seeing jack-o-lanterns...wow, I love Halloween. Honestly, I would not take my children to a church event or probably a mall event, which seem to be the common TorT alternatives. They seem very antiseptic to me, and we are atheists who hate the mall! Also, wait, don't these events have candy too?? Realistically, how many Halloween events are there that don't involve at least some candy??? I've never even heard of one.
post #107 of 275
We give out glowsticks and playdough. We're the most popular house in the neighborhood. Even the older kids exclaim "COOL! Playdough" as they are walking away...

Yes, we throw candy away. Kids can't have artificial colorings and so anything with it gets thrown away. They are too little to determine on their own whether they can have it or not. And no, I'm not going to say "no thanks" to houses that give out candy with it in it. No way. It would be taken as rude and my 3 YO might throw a tantrum. I'm LOLing a little at this thread... geeze, its Halloween... and everyone throws things away sometimes...

They can eat all the want that night and I'm pretty lose with it until its gone. They just can't have it within an hour before a meal. And I usually discard anything that hasn't been eaten by Christmas.
post #108 of 275
Oh, and also--YES, what Tigerchild said! That was part of what I was trying to say, but she did it better.
post #109 of 275
Also wanted to say that my children as well are far more fascinated with going up to strange houses and ringing doorbells than they are with the candy. A lot of people in the neighborhood go all out with decorations, come to the door dressed up themselves, ect. Don't get me wrong, they like the candy (and while I don't buy it really we do not see candy as forbidden). They have fun sorting it later. We also found it a good way to practice manners (the kids always say thank you afterwards) when they were littler.

There is more to ToTing than candy. And we DO do ToT for UNICEF (though to be honest my kids are more into other more locally tangible charities).

Just because you throw a HFCS encrusted nugget of trans-fat into the garbage can doesn't mean much. For us, the fun of Halloween has been more about other stuff (like homemade costumes, parties with friends, getting to run around the neighborhood in the dark with a flashlight on a school night) than the candy. :P
post #110 of 275
Again, I am so surprised that this outcry of intentional waste was no where to be seen or heard in the happy meal thread where people are BUYING happy meals with the intent of throwing the food away. Is it solely because it is McDonald's that makes that waste ok?
post #111 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellien C View Post
And my mother said something very wise - better in the trash, than in your stomach. And she was really right about that. I had enjoyed the wine with dinner. I was done enjoying it. There was no point in putting MORE wine in my stomach, just to not waste it. It really was better off in the trash than in my stomach.
I agree with this, and I think that eating food you don't need to eat for nourishment or even pleasure, is wasting it. It's overconsumption, which is waste. All things being equal, however, I still would rather not drive up the production of a junk product just to enjoy collecting it. I like the Unicef idea, actually. I can't really comprehend the environmental implications of all this manufacturing of plastic and food items for Halloween, and I suppose taking it and eating it is just as bad as throwing it away. But there are parents who allow their children to go Trick-or-Treating, have a piece or two of candy, then allow their children to trade it in for a toy and the candy is trashed. I can understand why people do it, I'm not criticizing because I am a huge consumer. I just bought a junky cake for my daughter's birthday, and I'm going to throw it away soon--she hasn't asked for any of it past the first piece. In retrospect I shouldn't have bought it.

So I am just saying that while I understand why people do it and I may do it, it doesn't seem ideal, and I don't think there is anything wrong with challenging ourselves to do better.

On the other hand, I don't know what the implications are in the lives of the families who produce the candy and wrappers and toys. It probably does allow them to make a living. But I'd rather buy fair trade or something else that I think will actually get consumed and give pleasure to the consumer. I hate the really junky candy full of artificial colors and who knows what else, that kids won't even eat. I've taken to putting some of my kids' candy back in our bowl to redistribute--maybe the same stuff gets passed around and given out year after year.
post #112 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by pjs View Post
Again, I am so surprised that this outcry of intentional waste was no where to be seen or heard in the happy meal thread where people are BUYING happy meals with the intent of throwing the food away. Is it solely because it is McDonald's that makes that waste ok?
Do you have a link to that thread?
post #113 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnviroBecca View Post
If I've accepted food to be polite, I'll eat it if I possibly can (I'm not painfully full, and it doesn't literally make me gag) and adjust my eating later in the day to compensate.
I don't understand how this leads to less waste. The food has already been used up in preparation/plating. Whether it goes in your stomach or in the trash, it can't be used to feed someone else who is hungry at that point.

I don't get how eating past the point of comfort is helpful at all. I can see how not accepting food when you're not hungry could be helpful, because then that food would still be available for someone else to eat. But shoving stuff down your gullet when you'd rather not? That's very unappetizing, and could lead to a really weird relationship with food, I would think.
post #114 of 275
I've seen a few references to trick or treating for UNICEF instead of candy. I just wanted to point out that not everyone supports UNICEF. http://www.newsweek.com/id/105531

Catherine
post #115 of 275
In addition to donating candy or saving saving it for Christmas/holiday baking, there are two other things you can use it for:

You can use it to decorate gingerbread houses.

You can use it in science experiments. I read an article recently where a mom encouraged her kids to do this. They tested what melted in water and what happened when you heated different candies. Also, they put them in vinegar to see if any caused fizzing. I can't find a link to the article, but it I do I'll post it. I plan to suggest this to my kids this year.

BTW - I think the soldiers overseas use some of the candy to give to local children to help promote good relations between the military and the locals.
post #116 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnviroBecca View Post
This will leave us with only hard candies, which are good to keep around through the winter in case of sore throats.
hard candies can be used in stained glass sugar cookies. cut out the cookie, then cut a smaller shape from the middle. drop some crushed hard candy in the middle. it will melt and give is a stained glass window effect. things with peppermint taste good mixed into chocolate.
post #117 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by loraxc View Post
Storm Bride, I think maybe you are focusing on the "TorT is ASKING for something" aspect much more than I do, and even most young kids do. I don't think my DD thinks of it as going door to door requesting candy to be given to her. I think she sees it as an exciting ritual that mysteriously ends in candy. I don't even think most kids get the literal meaning of "trick or treat."

I think the goodie bag parallel holds. Many here are saying "Well, if you don't want the candy, then don't trick or treat." To me that makes as much sense as saying, "Well, if you don't want the goodie bag, don't go to the party." Just because you may not use the party favor/candy you are given doesn't mean you have to miss the whole event, in my book!

We really don't TorT for the candy here. I mean, a little bit, but till she was 4 we didn't even show DD the candy and she was thrilled, THRILLED to TorT. It's about the fun of the costume and showing it off, the excitement of being out after in the mysterious after-dark world, the strangeness of knocking at unknown doors, seeing jack-o-lanterns...wow, I love Halloween.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Orchid View Post
We give out glowsticks and playdough. We're the most popular house in the neighborhood. Even the older kids exclaim "COOL! Playdough" as they are walking away...
So, if I'd ever met kids who were like this, I might have been able to understand where you're coming from. If kids around here know that a house hands out anything but candy (and maybe glowsticks, but nobody does that around here), they don't bother going there. I've never heard "cool Playdough". The kids say "thank you" or don't, depending on their upbringings/personalities, but they don't like that stuff. They want candy. I've never met a kid who doesn't trick or treat for the candy first and the costume second. Heck - I know kids who don't even like to trick-or-treat (scared), but do it for the candy. So - yeah - I see it as asking for candy, because that's what it is for the ones I've met.

As for the goody bag thing? I don't even get what that has to do with it. Kids have been going to each other's parties since long before the goody bag craze started.

Quote:
Honestly, I would not take my children to a church event or probably a mall event, which seem to be the common TorT alternatives. They seem very antiseptic to me, and we are atheists who hate the mall! Also, wait, don't these events have candy too?? Realistically, how many Halloween events are there that don't involve at least some candy??? I've never even heard of one.
If I objected to Halloween candy, I'd throw party, with Halloween themed food, and no candy. I wouldn't attend a candy-based event, trick-or-treating or otherwise.
post #118 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by meowee View Post
If someone gave you a pack of cigarettes would you throw them away or donate them? Candy is not much better than cigarettes. You're doing the world a favor by throwing it away. Sugar, HFCS, artificial flavors/ coloring, hydrogenated fats, preservatives, an often sticky consistency which is horrible for teeth and gums.

I would not accept the cigarettes int he first place.
post #119 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viola View Post
So I am just saying that while I understand why people do it and I may do it, it doesn't seem ideal, and I don't think there is anything wrong with challenging ourselves to do better.
I think this is an excellent point! I don't think anyone should be banned from MDC or loses crunchy points for throwing Halloween candy away. I am certain I do things that would horrify some people here. But I think it's worthwhile to discuss alternatives and look for better ways of doing things. I've gotten lots of ideas from this thread .
post #120 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by loraxc View Post
Are all of you who think this is so horrible doing everything possible to eliminate food and packaging waste elsewhere? Yes, EnviroBecca is, but what about the rest? Do you go to fast food restaurants? Do you get take-out? Do you buy disposable items for parties? How is your child's lunch packaged? Do you compost? What percentage of your groceries are not packaged?
Well, as for us... we buy in bulk and avoid excessive packaging. Dd has never even had McDonald's and we do not eat fast food. We don't get take out, but we also don't bring our own packaging when we bring food home from the restaurant. The packaging does get recycled, though. We have about twice the amount of recycling as we do garbage, and mostly that is because of the limitations of our recycling provider. We compost, of course, we are gardeners. We don't use paper plates, napkins, paper towels (yes, toilet paper), etc. Dd has a planet box and a metal lunch box and we use homemade "ziplock" bags and sandwich wraps. We use Klickbox for fruit and such for the metal lunch box. Even her yogurt is bulk yogurt mixed with homemade, canned fruit spreads. Yes, we still have garbage. Yes, we still have packaging that goes to landfill. But... there are also a lot of people out there that are also trying... in every.single.way... to not waste our resources. I'm one and I'm not alone. Your post is a challenge, but there are a lot of people here who are up to it.

Uneaten Halloween candy in our house gets recycled for advent calendars, Birthday treats, Valentine's candy, Easter candy, general treats... etc. We still have about a handful that will be baked into a thank you gift for our neighbors who are letting us borrow their tiller tomorrow.

Don't underestimate what NFL people are really able to do. And I'm a slacker compared to some of my friends!
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