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Throwing candy away - Page 7

post #121 of 275
I think this thread has been pretty amazing. That said~
I loved the idea of sending the candy to soldiers in IRAQ, that is just perfect!

What I really don't understand is the THROWING it in the TRASH part. I mean, by all means take your kids out, yes, the people are giving out the candy and yes you are free (FREE!) to take it, but by all means, don't throw it in the friggin trash! Please, just give it to someone, even if you think candy is junk, other people LOVE it and it really is a waste, other people really would like to have it!
post #122 of 275
Hey, I do all that stuff too. Um, seriously. But I sort of doubt most people here do--even on MDC. In my experience, even people who eat all organic, etc are still often very wasteful. It's sort of a different level of consciousness.

Quote:
Uneaten Halloween candy in our house gets recycled for advent calendars, Birthday treats, Valentine's candy, Easter candy, general treats... etc. We still have about a handful that will be baked into a thank you gift for our neighbors who are letting us borrow their tiller tomorrow.
Okay, here's one thing. I live in a lower-middle class neighborhood. A high number of people do NOT hand out chocolate. It's the cheaper stuff--Smarties, SweetTarts, Nerds, etc. Basically it's sugar and dyes and artiificial flavors. Honestly, it's hardly even food.

Plus, maybe someone will flame me for this, but I personally don't want to eat year-old candy.

I just...man, I don't know. I do a lot every day to reduce my impact. I don't see how forcing down a box of Nerds really helps any, and I don't get how eating that box of Nerds makes me an environmentalist. It's not like candy is real food that serves nutritional purposes and can replace other food you would normally eat.

The real high ground here would be not to trick-or-treat at all. Whether you eat it or throw it away, you have created the demand and the items have been purchased.
post #123 of 275
I just found out that our kid's new dentist will actually buy their Halloween candy from them, by the pound. I love this--my kids love making money and picking out little toys or saving up for something bigger. The candy the dental office buys will then be donated to the huge gingerbread village that is created at a local resort hotel each holiday season. I told the kids already, and they're very excited. We'll let them enjoy some of the mini candy bars, but after the weekend, they're eager to make a sale!
post #124 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3boobykins View Post
I just found out that our kid's new dentist will actually buy their Halloween candy from them, by the pound. I love this--my kids love making money and picking out little toys or saving up for something bigger. The candy the dental office buys will then be donated to the huge gingerbread village that is created at a local resort hotel each holiday season. I told the kids already, and they're very excited. We'll let them enjoy some of the mini candy bars, but after the weekend, they're eager to make a sale!
LOL, that is so cool!
post #125 of 275
i'm sure there are worse things to waste...and while i don't really think that in my child's stomach is a much better place for most candy than in the trash...

i don't see the goodness in throwing away something new. why get it in the first place? especially if kids are going to have candy sometimes anyway, why not this candy, saved for those occasions, instead of having trashed the halloween candy and then buying more (or obtaining from somewhere) for treats later on...

obviously, everyone has their different reasons for the different things that they do...personally, i would just rather limit the amount (and quality) ofcandy that comes in the door. dd is pretty small, but imagine that in the future we will have a few pre planned destinations for t or t and it won't be a really big event. but some people probably really want it to be a big event and thus would have a much harder time limiting the candy...since that does seem to be the point of t or t to most people.

anyway...whatever.

yes, it's really ideal to not waste. i personally make a big effort to not waste in many ways. i would rather give away an excess of candy than throw it in the trash...but i would prefer to not buy it or obtain it in the first place. so thats how i solve the "too much candy" dilemma.
post #126 of 275
having trouble posting...
post #127 of 275
Quote:
I just found out that our kid's new dentist will actually buy their Halloween candy from them, by the pound. I love this--my kids love making money and picking out little toys or saving up for something bigger. The candy the dental office buys will then be donated to the huge gingerbread village that is created at a local resort hotel each holiday season. I told the kids already, and they're very excited. We'll let them enjoy some of the mini candy bars, but after the weekend, they're eager to make a sale!
perfect
post #128 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by loraxc View Post
The real high ground here would be not to trick-or-treat at all. Whether you eat it or throw it away, you have created the demand and the items have been purchased.
While the real high ground may indeed be not to ToT at all, that idea has been rejected by many here for various reasons and doesn't seem realistic for many people. Personally, I think there is an area to be explored between not ToT and ToT and trashing all the candy. I don't see why it has to be so extreme one way or the other. If I thought like that, I would never recycle, reuse, or give away anything but rather trash it all because hey the real high ground would have been to not purchase the item in the first place so why bother trying.
post #129 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drummer's Wife View Post
I can't imagine getting that much extra candy! Maybe we don't trick or treat for long enough, but we never have, like, pillowcases full.

ETA: I would say on average, our Halloween candy lasts 2 weeks, if that.
come to my neighborhood! we get excessive amounts-for real.

we instituted a fun tradition a few years back-we let them have a piece or two a day for 2 weeks, then we have a bonfire with friends and burn the rest. (after us parents have culled the stuff we love-usually what gets burnt is some of those nasty peanut butter taffy things and some hard candy)

its a very small amount of candy that actually gets thrown out. maybe two or three handfuls.
post #130 of 275
Quote:
If I thought like that, I would never recycle, reuse, or give away anything but rather trash it all because hey the real high ground would have been to not purchase the item in the first place so why bother trying.
Huh?? No, if you thought like that you wouldn't buy it in the first place.

BTW, I don't trash all the candy. DD can have 2 or 3 pieces a day, but she usually forgets about it or loses interest after less than a week. I am not going to REMIND her about it. At that point, DH or I probably eat the leftovers we like, but if there is stuff we don't want (always a small amount) it goes in the trash. We may have brought it in to DH's office a few times--I can't remember.
post #131 of 275
I plan on letting my DD dress up and go down the block once for a treat. I do feel she is still pretty young to eat a lot of candy. So, I will probably give most of it away to other trick or treaters we see on the way home.

But really, who cares what people do with the candy. The experience is what counts.
post #132 of 275
Dd loves dressing up. She loves walking to houses with her friends. She loves walking around after dark. She loves "being scared". She loves a few pieces of candy...and only certain kinds.... The people in our neighborhood are very generous with the quantities, especially with little kids. Many are senior citizens and have no idea that our society has changed so much that candy is no longer a "treat". it is everywhere and it is every day. Every event, errand, party, classroom bribe, soccer game, etc....

So, yep, I let dd do the ToTing thing even though I know 99% of the candy will not pass through the bodies of our family. Dd picks through the bag, eats a few pieces, feels sick, then hands the bag over. She does like to save a few pieces for later but even those end up being found uneaten somewhere months later. We try to have dd ToT early then hand out the candy she collects but does not want later in the evening. The rest now goes in the garbage (after dh picks out the dark chocolates). I do not bake with candy. Dh tried taking it to work one year only for it to be set out with the 20 other bowls from every other parent in the office. It all sat for weeks and finally got tossed there....after many complaints from co-workers who are trying to live healthy lifestyles. And honestly, I donate a great deal of food and cash to shelters and food banks but do not consider Halloween candy "food".
post #133 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3boobykins View Post
I just found out that our kid's new dentist will actually buy their Halloween candy from them, by the pound. I love this--my kids love making money and picking out little toys or saving up for something bigger. The candy the dental office buys will then be donated to the huge gingerbread village that is created at a local resort hotel each holiday season. I told the kids already, and they're very excited. We'll let them enjoy some of the mini candy bars, but after the weekend, they're eager to make a sale!
that is so cool!!!!
post #134 of 275
If you donate the candy to the gingerbread house display, it gets trashed afterwards. Just sayin'. And I am pretty sure your local food bank does not want the candy, dumping a bunch of stale leftover or cheap candy in the food donation bins is pretty common (or was when I volunteered at a food bank), and in some cases if the original big bag is not sealed (and thus there's no way to know if the little pieces have been tampered with) it must go...you guessed it...in the garbage dumpster.

Please don't donate things to food pantries that are junk or that you wouldn't eat yourself. I can't tell you how depressing it is to sort through a big container of donated items only to find a lot of expired, old, weird, inappropriate items making up half of it.

A lot of these disposal methods probably wind up with much of the candy being thrown away anyway--it's just that the person dumping it in a different location doesn't have to be the actual person throwing it away. A lot of workplaces will have the night custodial staff throw away old stuff after awhile if they don't want it. So sure, I suppose one can feel morally superior for allowing someone else to put it in the landfill for them but...

Anyway, I think the highest morality responsibility probably belongs on the people who are buying the crap, not the ToTers. Most young kids frankly don't give a rip what they get in their ToT bags. If it really bothers you that your stuff might end up in the trash then get something compostable, whee problem solved. Or does it have to be consumed by a person vs. bacteria/roaches/rats/slugs/cute worm bin worms? Though I guess candy could be construed as compostable (maybe?) as long as you take off the wrappers....
post #135 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
So, if I'd ever met kids who were like this, I might have been able to understand where you're coming from. If kids around here know that a house hands out anything but candy (and maybe glowsticks, but nobody does that around here), they don't bother going there. I've never heard "cool Playdough". The kids say "thank you" or don't, depending on their upbringings/personalities, but they don't like that stuff. They want candy. I've never met a kid who doesn't trick or treat for the candy first and the costume second. Heck - I know kids who don't even like to trick-or-treat (scared), but do it for the candy. So - yeah - I see it as asking for candy, because that's what it is for the ones I've met.
Yeah Playdough is definitely uncool in our neighbourhood. Ditto glowsticks. Actually I'm not sure what's in glowsticks but I suspect they're not great for the environment either.

Anyways, like I said, I honestly think the tradition just is behind the reality. We like trick or treating - it's a really nice chance to talk to our neighbours, etc. Last year I was surprised at the quantity of candy - way way beyond what I used to get as a kid. It does create a dilemma that I still haven't myself mentally resolved. I'm unwilling to give up the tradition, but equally unwilling to have the candy in our lives for six months, so hopefully it will be baking-friendly for the most part.
post #136 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by loraxc View Post
Huh?? No, if you thought like that you wouldn't buy it in the first place.
I have the flu and maybe am not the most coherent at the moment and quite possibly shouldn't be posting , but I get that...really I do. I mentioned earlier that if I thought candy was that gross, I wouldn't take my kids ToT, but others said how horrible it was to be left out of trick or treating and how it's not fair, so clearly not everyone feels the same about that. Anyway, you seemed to me (quite possibly mistakenly ) to be saying that if you don't take the high ground and not ToT, then it really doesn't matter what you do with the candy. I just took that a step further. Personally, I think it matters. I don't think it makes anyone a bad person for trashing it, but nonetheless, there are often alternatives.

Quote:
Originally Posted by loraxc View Post
BTW, I don't trash all the candy. DD can have 2 or 3 pieces a day, but she usually forgets about it or loses interest after less than a week. I am not going to REMIND her about it. At that point, DH or I probably eat the leftovers we like, but if there is stuff we don't want (always a small amount) it goes in the trash. We may have brought it in to DH's office a few times--I can't remember.
I think that is a lot different than going around and ToT with the intent of throwing most of it away like in the OP. Although I don't recall, I may have thrown some out some that wasn't even worthy of making the trip to DH's office, but those people will usually eat anything so I doubt it . I figure if it keeps them from raiding the vending machine, it's better than trashing it.
post #137 of 275
I used to manage a DV shelter, and I agree that no one [I]needs[I] candy, but when one person dropped off a bag of the candy her DC couldn't eat *he had multiple allergies*, my clients and their children were so appreciative! Often times children living in a shelter wont be able to ToT because of safety issues *although our staff would do whatever needed to make it possible from buying costumes to driving them to other neighborhoods* so having actual ToT candy to give them was such a treat for them.

So I just wanted to toss the idea of donation in there. I agree that halloween candy is crap, but having seen the eyes of people in a shelter light up getting some makes me want to suggest donation to you
post #138 of 275
I think that it is horrible to encourage your child to go out and trick or treat and then just throw away the candy because wrapped foods are one of the few things they can actual witness going to someone who will appreciate them if they don't want to eat them. So much other stuff has to be thrown away and wasted that I jump on opportunities to show dd how to not waste something. I also would be offended if my neighbor told me they dumped the candy I gave their children at Halloween the day after Halloween because I do give the extra candy to people who want it.

If you don't want the kids to eat another piece of candy before it goes bad then why not just give it to friend, the people at your work or your spouses work, or bag it up and drop it off at your local shelter, if you live near a college you can drop it off at a dorm or student center, you can even give it to a homeless person. I understand wanting kids to share in the joy of Halloween, but I don't understand wasting food that is wrapped and can easily be donated to someone who will enjoy it and appreciate it. I also haven't found that Halloween candy is stale the day after getting it so I don't see any reason why people should consider it a substandard donation. A food bank that won't sort it for months probably wouldn't want it, but an actual shelter would.
post #139 of 275
I just wanted to say thank you to the person/people who pointed out that it's nice to get treats from the Food Bank. DS and I bought an extra package of Newman's Oreos (he has dairy allergies and I thought maybe someone else would too) and put them in the grocery store donation bin today. It's something I wouldn't have thought of on my own.

Catherine
post #140 of 275
Quote:
Please don't donate things to food pantries that are junk or that you wouldn't eat yourself. I can't tell you how depressing it is to sort through a big container of donated items only to find a lot of expired, old, weird, inappropriate items making up half of it.
See, this is why I probably wouldn't donate our leftovers, which would only be really cheap candy anyway, most likely. It just seems...I dunno...like I am saying "This crap candy is such crap that no one here in my house wants it--but those poor people will take anything, so here." Same with the awful cheap goodie bag toys, which I also would not donate. I'd rather throw these items away and buy some healthful food and decent toys. I mean, I do get that some people indeed would be grateful for whatever, but something about the whole idea doesn't sit well with me. I also do not donate clothes that I can't get the stains out of (I use them for rags).
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