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Throwing candy away - Page 8

post #141 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dandelionkid View Post
Yup- candy is total crap. I don't feel a shred of guilt throwing it out. It is complete garbage for human bodies so really, it's either our bodies as a dumpster, or a dumpster as a dumpster
Exactly!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by WC_hapamama View Post
Honestly, even if Halloween candy isn't ideal nutritionally, I still think it's wasteful to throw it away.

If you insist on having your kids trick-or-treat despite the fact that you won't let them eat the crappy candy, why not donate the candy you won't let them eat to a homeless shelter, soup kitchen, meals on wheels program, nursing home or food pantry. Even poor people and old people like a treat occasionally, and even a handful of fun sized Snickers bars is better than going hungry.
I have a problem with telling my kids that candy is essentially poison to their bodies....but let's go give it to grandma or that homeless guy.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JL83 View Post

I am SHOCKED on MDC to see so many people OK with just throwing things out. It's really very horrible. Why not just do disposable diapers then? Why bother buying bulk and using reusable containers to take snacks?

It's actually quite sickening to read how many people think it's perfectly OK to just throw out the candy rather than donating it to charity or giving directly to the less fortunate.
I am SHOCKED on MDC to see so many people who would allow their kids candy for the sake of not disposing of it. To me it's like if my kid found a bag of crack and I told him he could have some so it wouldn't go to waste. Seriously? Trick or treating is FUN, it's a tradition in our culture, and I think we can come up with a more creative and thoughtful way to respect their bodies and the environment at the same time.

If there was an "all natural ToT party" I would certainly take my kids there. Even if it was junky trinkets, I would rather my kids play with junk than eat junk. But there are no such parties, so we ToT around the neighborhood. Have a few pieces and then it disappears.
post #142 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heatherb917 View Post
I am SHOCKED on MDC to see so many people who would allow their kids candy for the sake of not disposing of it. To me it's like if my kid found a bag of crack and I told him he could have some so it wouldn't go to waste. Seriously? .
Comparing candy to crack is absurd. Yes, candy isn't the best thing for you, but it's not an illegal drug that can kill you if you eat too much.
post #143 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by choli View Post
Do you have a link to that thread?
Please?

Because I knew in high school that I could go up to a fast food counter and request to buy a toy without buying the kid's meal it goes with. I did that on occasion for my littlest brothers, then-toddlers.
post #144 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcstar View Post
Please?

Because I knew in high school that I could go up to a fast food counter and request to buy a toy without buying the kid's meal it goes with. I did that on occasion for my littlest brothers, then-toddlers.
I'm pretty sure this is the thread:

http://www.mothering.com/discussions....php?t=1137337
post #145 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerchild View Post
If you donate the candy to the gingerbread house display, it gets trashed afterwards. Just sayin'. And I am pretty sure your local food bank does not want the candy, dumping a bunch of stale leftover or cheap candy in the food donation bins is pretty common (or was when I volunteered at a food bank), and in some cases if the original big bag is not sealed (and thus there's no way to know if the little pieces have been tampered with) it must go...you guessed it...in the garbage dumpster.
Actually - many food banks and charities LOVE to get the candy. Some have strict rules, but most don't. If it's wrapped (so no loose jelly beans) they'll take it and give it out. The food bank my friend worked at would package up the ToT candy into 1lb bags and give to families with kids.

My church used to run a homeless shelter during the winter. They'd take candy and give it to people in their lunches as they left at 7am so they could snack on it and it would help them stay warm during the day.
post #146 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerchild View Post
One of many things I have learned from MDC is how toxic it is to give a gift and not be able to let go of it afterwards. It brings such horrible emotions and energy to both the giver and receiver when that happens--and yet STILL it's not like it changes the control issue.

So to those who are shocked that someone could be a member of MDC for years and 'waste' candy or a gift--I ask you, how in the world could you read all these stories of family feuds over dispensation of gifts, ect, and not come to the conclusion that if you're GOING to give something then do everyone a favor and give it willingly, freely, and with no strings attached!!!

I cannot believe the amount of spite and anger over what other people do with their halloween candy. The reverse is also true--if you can't hack people not eating the candy you chose then don't hand it out!!

Do people really spend time being angry over this? Or is this riling up for the purposes of debate?

Let anyone who wants to ToT do so. Let anyone who does not want to not. Let anyone who wants to give out candy, broccoli, toys, stickers, juice boxes, whatever is legal to give out give it! Let anyone who wishes to take it take it. And let whatever happens after Halloween be the business of people in their own families.


Well said.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Teensy View Post
In addition to donating candy or saving saving it for Christmas/holiday baking, there are two other things you can use it for:

You can use it to decorate gingerbread houses.

You can use it in science experiments. I read an article recently where a mom encouraged her kids to do this. They tested what melted in water and what happened when you heated different candies. Also, they put them in vinegar to see if any caused fizzing. I can't find a link to the article, but it I do I'll post it. I plan to suggest this to my kids this year.

BTW - I think the soldiers overseas use some of the candy to give to local children to help promote good relations between the military and the locals.
Very good ideas. I love the science experiment idea.

I think the cookie idea is also a good one. But in our house, all of the cookie worthy candy gets eaten as is. I can't imagine using the yucky candy in perfectly good cookies. Then I'd be stuck with cookies nobody will eat to throw out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerchild View Post
If you donate the candy to the gingerbread house display, it gets trashed afterwards. Just sayin'. And I am pretty sure your local food bank does not want the candy, dumping a bunch of stale leftover or cheap candy in the food donation bins is pretty common (or was when I volunteered at a food bank), and in some cases if the original big bag is not sealed (and thus there's no way to know if the little pieces have been tampered with) it must go...you guessed it...in the garbage dumpster.

Please don't donate things to food pantries that are junk or that you wouldn't eat yourself. I can't tell you how depressing it is to sort through a big container of donated items only to find a lot of expired, old, weird, inappropriate items making up half of it.

A lot of these disposal methods probably wind up with much of the candy being thrown away anyway--it's just that the person dumping it in a different location doesn't have to be the actual person throwing it away. A lot of workplaces will have the night custodial staff throw away old stuff after awhile if they don't want it. So sure, I suppose one can feel morally superior for allowing someone else to put it in the landfill for them but...

Anyway, I think the highest morality responsibility probably belongs on the people who are buying the crap, not the ToTers. Most young kids frankly don't give a rip what they get in their ToT bags. If it really bothers you that your stuff might end up in the trash then get something compostable, whee problem solved. Or does it have to be consumed by a person vs. bacteria/roaches/rats/slugs/cute worm bin worms? Though I guess candy could be construed as compostable (maybe?) as long as you take off the wrappers....
I keep thinking as I read all of the donation suggestions, "What would the folks over in the decluttering forum have to say about this?" I think this post summed it up.

And speaking of decluttering, it can be wasteful to hang onto stuff that you really don't want/need. It takes up time and space and other resources to maintain.
post #147 of 275
We recycled last year...DS1 has severe food allergies and we don't keep nuts, seeds, eggs, milk or soy in the house. I let him ToT early and then gave out all his collected candy to our ToTers This year I might give some dum-dum lollipops to one of our neighbors so that he can eat one thing from his bag and then do the same thing again. He's only three and likes the idea of handing out his own candy just fine for now, especially since he's scared of his allergens and knows that none of it is safe, you know? Seems like others could do this too.... It's a fun tradition, but no one needs too much candy, right? Kids on the block could just dump their loot at home every so often for their parents to re-treat and go out for more
post #148 of 275
BTW, on my allergy forum people many do the "switch witch". They trade the unsafe candy (nearly all, in most cases) for some toy at the end of the evening (and then most of the parents eat some themselves and bring the rest to their workplace or donate it). It's a necessity in the case of severe food allergies, of course...and most parents want their food allergic kid to still have the fun of ToTing, even if they truly can not eat the candy....
post #149 of 275
I think that everyone would agree that the case of an allergic child is entirely different.
post #150 of 275
We donate a lot of candy to HUGS, which is a project that sends candy overseas in care packages. Another good place is to take it to your local homeless shelter/mental health center. Often they can use the candy for children that come through, and it makes a big difference. To just throw anything away just isn't something I want my kids to learn, not even just candy. There's a purpose for everything.
post #151 of 275
My sister lets them eat all they want on Halloween and then buys it from them the next day. They negotiate the fair price together.

I don't let mine eat all they want on Halloween if it's a school night. The November 1st hangover is too ugly for that. But this year it's barfin' all night long if they want it!
post #152 of 275
I guess we are some of the bad people who junk the candy we don't want. It is usually the really weird stuff in the shape of body parts that I question the safety of. I will not pass that crap on to other people as I am pretty sure it is full of stuff that should not be consumed

Honestly, we DON'T ToT for the candy *at all*. We go out because it is fun. Our neighbourhood is full of so many great people and we have only gotten to know most of them from our yearly ToT adventures. We have 4 kids, so our time out is generally not too terribly long, but we always end up going just another few blocks just to see how people are doing. Short, but friendly conversations at every house. Seeing all the other kids in costumes. Checking out some of the really cool decorations. It is purely a social event, and I am always so uplifted by the wonderful sense of community it instills in us.

THAT is the lesson I am teaching my kids, community. The candy is just incidental, and they always end up with a ridiculous amount even in the short time we are out. Actually, our last several walks around the neighbourhood this week has led to people coming out of their houses to remind us to come by because they will have some great treats I just love that we have a friendly relationship with all these people because of an event I didn't eve want to celebrate for the first several years of my eldest ds' life (eeeek, candy!).

One of my kids does have a severe food allergy and he can't have most of what is given. We always buy chocolate bars that we know he can have and trade him for some of it. Otherwise we make sure to be home early so I can recycle as much as possible to the older kids in VERY generous amounts. But the stuff that seems sketchy (the aforementioned body part candy for instance) goes straight to the bin. Even if it is wasteful I couldn't pass it on in good conscience.

Quote:
Every single grocery store around here has a donation bin for food! Even the floofy over priced natural/organic store has one.

How hard is it to take the bag of candy you don't want, put it in the large cardboard bin, and then go do your shopping?

There's no phoning or driving or anything beyond what you normally do.

Even the dreaded evil Walmarts have them.

That way the candy could go to people while it's still pretty fresh and be enjoyed by someone who wouldn't otherwise get any.
Although this could have been stated with *slightly* less attitude you make a very good point. I never thought of that and will probably do this with the non-scary leftovers this year. We are usually pretty sick of all the sugar after the first couple of days as we don't really eat stuff like this any other time (save for the occasional organic fair trade chocolate bars of course ). I am with the posters who find this all amusing. Such a small thing to get so worked up over.
post #153 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by choli View Post
So then why send your kids out to knock on doors and ask for crap?
I stated in my post that we only trick or treat on our block - 10 houses tops. The other Halloween thing we do does not involve candy at all. So I do limit how much candy they are receiving in the first place. They have a lot of fun getting dressed up and going to each house so why should I stop them? We also have a number of elderly neighbors who really enjoy seeing all the kids and handing out some candy. So then if I throw out 20 pieces of candy the first week of November, I don't think that matters much especially relative to how much fun everyone has.
post #154 of 275
The only candy that ever got tossed when we were little were the pieces with open wrappers.

I never had my candy micromanaged. We were allowed to do whatever we wanted with our ToT candy and were also allowed to buy whatever candy - and as much of it - we wanted with our allowance. I loved candy as a kid...ate a lot, probably too much...but can say all of my sisters and I rarely eat candy, cake, desserts, etc. now. One pack of M and Ms can last for weeks. We all have a healthy relationship with food and consider desserts/cookies only occasional things.

So, I'm never going to do the "candy bowl" or what not...it's their candy to eat as they wish.

If my DD ended up with food sensitivities, we wouldn't go ToT and I'd try to avoid places where she's going to be on the receiving end of candy handouts. If they were older, though, without serious health problems, I'd let them self-regulate candy consumption...it's the best way to learn.
post #155 of 275
Ds only goes to a few neighbours houses(hes 3) so we go ahead of time w fruit-to-go bars that they give him...works out for everyone!
post #156 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crystal_R View Post
Comparing candy to crack is absurd. Yes, candy isn't the best thing for you, but it's not an illegal drug that can kill you if you eat too much.

no kidding...how ridiculous lol come on now...
post #157 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heatherb917 View Post
ould allow their kids candy for the sake of not disposing of it. To me it's like if my kid found a bag of crack and I told him he could have some so it wouldn't go to waste. Seriously? Trick or treating is FUN, it's a tradition in our culture, and I think we can come up with a more creative and thoughtful way to respect their bodies and the environment at the same time.

If there was an "all natural ToT party" I would certainly take my kids there. Even if it was junky trinkets, I would rather my kids play with junk than eat junk. But there are no such parties, so we ToT around the neighborhood. Have a few pieces and then it disappears.
So why not send your kids out to trick or treat with a bag full of safe healthy treats to GIVE to the people whose doors they knock, instead of to TAKE and throw away something they are given?
post #158 of 275
Quote:
So why not send your kids out to trick or treat with a bag full of safe healthy treats to GIVE to the people whose doors they knock, instead of to TAKE and throw away something they are given?
I can't speak for this poster, but there are lots of elderly people in my neighbourhood as well, and some of them look forward to giving candy to the kids every year. Some of them even dress up! They take great care in rooting through the candy bowl every year and picking out just the right treat for each child. Why would I take that experience away from them? Seems cruel!
post #159 of 275
Fascinating thread. I think the immediate binge/purge of gorging on candy on Hallowe'en and then throwing the leftovers away (as described in the OP) is unhealthy. I can't say that I really have a huge problem with tossing the candy though. I often found a half-filled bag of candy in a closet or drawer when I did the big New Year's clean-up in the house. It would all get tossed then because I don't like stale stuff. I certainly wouldn't give it to someone else at that point. Using it for decorating gingerbread houses is a great idea - but again it ends up in the garbage anyway.

I'm looking forward to Hallowe'en this year. We've been living in places that don't celebrate and I missed it. In some countries, the whole event is frowned upon on the grounds that it teaches children to beg and it's an excuse for Hell Night vandalism. They completely don't get the community aspect of Trick or Treating - visiting neighbours, admiring the costumes and decorations, the children's thrill at being allowed to run around after dark....
post #160 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crystal_R View Post
Comparing candy to crack is absurd. Yes, candy isn't the best thing for you, but it's not an illegal drug that can kill you if you eat too much.
Ditto this. Not all of us consider sugar to be poison. I am perfectly okay with letting my kids have access to candy and other junk food in moderation.

As far as my suggestion of donating candy to homeless shelters, nursing homes and food pantries goes, I'll repeat myself, not everyone thinks that sugar is poison.

For a homeless person who doesn't have access to a kitchen and regular meals, that handful of "garbage" or "poison" halloween candy is a source of calories.

IMO, while I think it's fine for parents to eliminate processed sugars from their kids diets if they're really that "afraid" of it, I think it's incredibly short-sighted for parents to teach their kids to look down their noses at other people's lifestyle choices, unless you're preparing them for the same treatment in the outside world... and I don't know many of that type who are telling their kids "Hey, most people think we're zealots."
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