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Throwing candy away - Page 11

post #201 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnviroBecca View Post
I realize a lot of people's relationships with food are badly broken but mine is not.
It must be nice to feel whole in the midst of so much brokenness.
post #202 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplemoon View Post
I am actually salivating at all this discussion of chocolate (the other stuff you can keep) and popcorn balls or caramel apples. YUM!
I would do just about anything to be able to give these away (made a couple of years ago):

http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=de1yfa&s=4

http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=2cs9gmp&s=4
post #203 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by sisteeesmama View Post
I think this thread has been pretty amazing. That said~
I loved the idea of sending the candy to soldiers in IRAQ, that is just perfect!

What I really don't understand is the THROWING it in the TRASH part. I mean, by all means take your kids out, yes, the people are giving out the candy and yes you are free (FREE!) to take it, but by all means, don't throw it in the friggin trash! Please, just give it to someone, even if you think candy is junk, other people LOVE it and it really is a waste, other people really would like to have it!
I totally agree with this. My dad is going to Afganistan very soon and I know he'd be THRILLED to receive candy...he LOVES it. In fact, anyone who wants to donate their leftover candy to him, PM me and i'll give you my address As much as you might hate candy or think it's wasteful or harmful etc, if there is someone else out there that wants it and would eat it, isn't it LESS wasteful to give it to them, then throw yours away and have them buy more (using more resources etc). I also love candy and if/when i get some I don't like, i pass it on to my co workers. Which also reminds me, if your child is in school, bring in some candy for their teachers Sometimes during one of those hard days a piece of candy goes a long way
post #204 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by JL83 View Post
Yes.

There are plenty of non-candy alternatives for celebrating Halloween. Many neighborhoods or communities have parties. You can throw a party with limited candy.

Your kid can go out trick-or-treating and simply not have a pillow but still have a blast with his friends.

Taking candy knowing you are going to throw it away is greedy and wasteful.
Haven't read the whole thread, but had to comment on this. Seriously? My child can not have the food dyes or we are looking at serious behavior issues, a nasty rash on his arms and a very unhappy little boy. HOWEVER, he can eat the chocolate, and enjoy the non-food items. So, would it be better that we go up to a house, say trick or treat, look at what they are handing out and say we don't want it? He can have some of it and some of it he can't. Why take the joy of the festivities away from him? How about the kid who can eat anything except stuff with nuts in it? Should they stay home too? Geez!

ETA: We only tot on our own block so we only get a limited amount of treats anyway. My dh works in a very health conscious office and they just wouldn't use it there. So, yes we do discard about 10-15 pieces each year.
post #205 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by bugginsmom View Post
Haven't read the whole thread, but had to comment on this. Seriously? My child can not have the food dyes or we are looking at serious behavior issues, a nasty rash on his arms and a very unhappy little boy. HOWEVER, he can eat the chocolate, and enjoy the non-food items. So, would it be better that we go up to a house, say trick or treat, look at what they are handing out and say we don't want it? He can have some of it and some of it he can't. Why take the joy of the festivities away from him? How about the kid who can eat anything except stuff with nuts in it? Should they stay home too? Geez!
No. They say give it away to someone else instead of throwing it away.

But some people don't want to harm others in what they percieve as health garbage and would rather throw it away.

Others made the suggestion that if you hate candy that much don't support the supply and demand and have a party instead.

Then people said that there are people who want candy even if it will rot their teeth like homeless people, sad people, lonely people, sad kids, dying people, old people.

Then others chimed in that ToT is a cultural fun time with kids parading their costumes and they want to participate and that people should invest in other things to give out. Stickers, play-doh, raisins.

Then others said kids wouldn't like that, they want candy.

And at the end of the day, it doesn't matter as long as you are happy with your decision to ingest candy, some of the candy, none of the candy, donate the candy, burn the candy or put it on a rocket with a sign of poison and shoot it into space.
post #206 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeRangeMama View Post
Um, wouldn't you throw the wrapper away anyway? And they are still going to MAKE the candy, and SHIP the candy, and PACKAGE the candy. So really it isn't about whether a person eats the candy or not, but about if people ToT or not.

ToT=waste. So all you candy eaters are just as guilty as the candy tossers

If people who are jsut going to throw it out, stop tot-ing, then those houses will not buy as much, which in the long run, means less produced. Or do you feel that way about everything? Meaning, oh well, they are going to make gas guzzling SUV no matter what so we all may as well by one?
post #207 of 275
to me it's like going to a buffet that serves desserts and loading up your plate, again and again, and just dumping it. maybe eating one bite, but dumping most of it. why take it at all? I just can't believe people will take something(or buy) with the INTENT to throw it away. Really? If you think it's garbage, don't take it!
post #208 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeRangeMama View Post
For YOU it may be about candy, for US it is about community. I am not the poster you are quoting, but in my neighbourhood it is a community thing. A chance to get out and visit neighbours and the ones with grown children (especially the seniors) just LOVE seeing the kids in their costumes. The candy is not the point at all, though we do eat the chocolate (just not the rest). I find it kind of sad that it isn't more community oriented everywhere, but is merely a candy grab. One more reason to be grateful for my neighbourhood (even though they give out some questionable candy ). There are lots of reasons to ToT that have NOTHING to do with candy. Maybe not for your family, but for lots of other families
So, have you broached the idea of just going around and showing costumes to each other? Visting on Halloween, without the "trick or treat" part?

Have you ever said, "oh, no thank you - we just like to visit the neighbours and dd likes to show off her costume"? Do any of your wonderful neighbours not hand out anything, or do they answer the door with a bowl of treats?

So, you think trick-or-treating shouldn't have treats? It should just be a community oriented excuse to take stuff from neighbours and throw it away?

I don't even get this. It's very community minded here, too...lots of the neighbours will be looking forward to seeing dd1's and ds2's costumes, and will definitely take time to admire dd2 in her Ergo when I take them out. But...this is a community and my kids don't need to ask for candy to interact with their neighbours. They do that every day. So do I. I'm grateful that I don't have to ask for things from my neighbours and then throw them away, in order to feel community minded.

This whole thread is blowing my mind. I'm sorry, but knocking on people's doors and asking for treats, knowing that you're going to throw those treats away, isn't what I think of when I think of community. YMMV.
post #209 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplemoon View Post
No. They say give it away to someone else instead of throwing it away.

But some people don't want to harm others in what they percieve as health garbage and would rather throw it away.

Others made the suggestion that if you hate candy that much don't support the supply and demand and have a party instead.

Then people said that there are people who want candy even if it will rot their teeth like homeless people, sad people, lonely people, sad kids, dying people, old people.

Then others chimed in that ToT is a cultural fun time with kids parading their costumes and they want to participate and that people should invest in other things to give out. Stickers, play-doh, raisins.

Then others said kids wouldn't like that, they want candy.

And at the end of the day, it doesn't matter as long as you are happy with your decision to ingest candy, some of the candy, none of the candy, donate the candy, burn the candy or put it on a rocket with a sign of poison and shoot it into space.
Gotcha!
post #210 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplemoon View Post
No. They say give it away to someone else instead of throwing it away.

But some people don't want to harm others in what they percieve as health garbage and would rather throw it away.

Others made the suggestion that if you hate candy that much don't support the supply and demand and have a party instead.

Then people said that there are people who want candy even if it will rot their teeth like homeless people, sad people, lonely people, sad kids, dying people, old people.

Then others chimed in that ToT is a cultural fun time with kids parading their costumes and they want to participate and that people should invest in other things to give out. Stickers, play-doh, raisins.

Then others said kids wouldn't like that, they want candy.

And at the end of the day, it doesn't matter as long as you are happy with your decision to ingest candy, some of the candy, none of the candy, donate the candy, burn the candy or put it on a rocket with a sign of poison and shoot it into space.
post #211 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplemoon View Post
No. They say give it away to someone else instead of throwing it away.

But some people don't want to harm others in what they percieve as health garbage and would rather throw it away.

Others made the suggestion that if you hate candy that much don't support the supply and demand and have a party instead.

Then people said that there are people who want candy even if it will rot their teeth like homeless people, sad people, lonely people, sad kids, dying people, old people.

Then others chimed in that ToT is a cultural fun time with kids parading their costumes and they want to participate and that people should invest in other things to give out. Stickers, play-doh, raisins.

Then others said kids wouldn't like that, they want candy.

And at the end of the day, it doesn't matter as long as you are happy with your decision to ingest candy, some of the candy, none of the candy, donate the candy, burn the candy or put it on a rocket with a sign of poison and shoot it into space.
post #212 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by peainthepod View Post
Besides, there are options besides all-natural candy--stickers, temporary tattoos, small change--it doesn't have to be candy at all. Treats don't have to be edible.
Yeah - but I know for a fact that most of the kids around here would throw those things away, and I see no point in buying something they'll just chuck. Whatever the parents might think about it, their kids are looking for candy.

Quote:
Back in the old days a "treat" could mean anything from a slice of pie and a cup of cider to an apple to a peck on the cheek from the lady of the house. For us it's about tradition and the magic of Halloween more than anything else.
Yup. And, nobody will do that, anymore. Nobody did that in my (very friendly) neighbourhood in the early 70s. The tradition now is to go get candy.
post #213 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
This whole thread is blowing my mind. I'm sorry, but knocking on people's doors and asking for treats, knowing that you're going to throw those treats away, isn't what I think of when I think of community. YMMV.
But that's the thing--not all houses give the same stuff away. If we know the neighbors, we'll accept things we wouldn't accept from strangers (like cookies, for instance). Some houses give prizes. Some houses give coins. Some houses give pretzels! It's not like we'd be knocking on your door to spite you. This is no different than tossing candy you don't want to eat simply because you don't like it.

We're not there for the candy, don't you see? We're there to say hi, show you our costumes, check out your Halloween decorations and jack o'lanterns, tell you, "Trick or treat!", and gratefully accept whatever you're handing out that year. It's a continuation of an old tradition that we happen to hold dear. That's it!

I would never refuse candy at someone's house, any more than I would refuse cookies or other unwrapped edibles from people we didn't know--that strikes me as horribly rude and ungracious. Just like I wouldn't refuse to take a helping at a dinner party because I didn't personally like what was being served.
post #214 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
Yeah - but I know for a fact that most of the kids around here would throw those things away, and I see no point in buying something they'll just chuck. Whatever the parents might think about it, their kids are looking for candy.
Maybe they would, but that's the chance you have to take when you give someone a gift. You don't get to decide what they do with it after you give it away, and stressing about something that's so far out of your control is bound to make you unhappy. And it's so unnecessary! Kids throw away the cheapo candy, or the candy with nuts, or all the candy (because they just want toys and stickers), or the candy without nuts, or the fruit candy (and keep the chocolate), or the chocolate (and keep the fruit, but save a Milky Way for Dad), etc. etc. This is no different.

Quote:
Yup. And, nobody will do that, anymore. Nobody did that in my (very friendly) neighbourhood in the early 70s. The tradition now is to go get candy.
But all neighborhoods and communities are not the same. In point of fact, there are a couple of elderly ladies in my new neighborhood that do hand out popcorn balls and cookies. The families who know them accept them gladly (one of them is supposed to be a marvelous baker). We just moved here a month ago but I will happily eat treats from those ladies, because I am joining a community I can trust to watch out for its own. I also know of an older man down the road who gives away pennies. Will we skip his house because of that? No! No more than we would return a package to a favorite auntie who sends the same predictable pair of socks for Christmas every year. In my family, it's not about the loot. Your mileage may vary.
post #215 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by vbactivist View Post
If people who are jsut going to throw it out, stop tot-ing, then those houses will not buy as much, which in the long run, means less produced. Or do you feel that way about everything? Meaning, oh well, they are going to make gas guzzling SUV no matter what so we all may as well by one?
I was responding specifically to the part where all the plastic wrapping of the uneaten candy was going in the garbage as the eaten candy has wrappers too. And just pointing out that the argument being made isn't really about the candy not being eaten, all candy causes waste.

But I think I am taking this whole thread a little less serious than many of you I find the idea of people fighting for pages and pages over *candy* a little silly. Eat it, don't eat it. Toss it, donate it. I think it has all been covered at this point.
post #216 of 275
My kids' candy collection at the end of the night would maybe fill a sandwich bag each. We live in a pretty widely spaced neighborhood, and we only walk as long as they're not cold/grumpy/whiney, once they start heading into that territory we're on our way home. So sorry, to all the people who think I'm a terrible person and terrible mother for throwing away a sandwich-sized bag of odds and ends candy at the end of the night. I can't say any of the impassioned shame on yous have really given me any guilt. I throw away more food from my occasionally picky eater's plate when I don't anticipate that his mood has shifted that way, than I do on Halloween night.

It's taken me a long time to get out of the packrat/must keep everything potentially useful/still good mentality, and I like it that way. Pretty much I am VERY strict on the 'reduction' end of reduce/reuse/recycle, but this is one night where I make the exception for my kids' sake, because they enjoy ToTing so much. By the time they outgrow it in a few years (and we didn't ToT until they were 3 and 4), I'm sorry, but I don't think the impact is as great as people who regularly buy organic fruit shipped from Argentina (assuming you don't live there).

I still don't get the total over the top reactions here. You'd think that a person who chucks a handful of candy, or slightly more, might as well have singlehandedly tipped the Exxon Valdez.
post #217 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by peainthepod View Post
Maybe they would, but that's the chance you have to take when you give someone a gift. You don't get to decide what they do with it after you give it away, and stressing about something that's so far out of your control is bound to make you unhappy. And it's so unnecessary!
I'm not stressing, nor am I unhappy. I know most of them will throw that stuff away, so I don't buy it. No stress involved.

Quote:
Kids throw away the cheapo candy, or the candy with nuts, or all the candy (because they just want toys and stickers),
And, as I say, if you know kids like that, that's great. I've never met one - not one. A few of them will keep the toys, but none of them throw away the candy. And, I do remember classmates whose parents threw away the candy when I was kid. Every one of them cadged any candy they could get from their classmates in the days after Halloween, and were really unhappy about having their candy thrown out, after they "worked so hard" to get it.

Quote:
But all neighborhoods and communities are not the same. In point of fact, there are a couple of elderly ladies in my new neighborhood that do hand out popcorn balls and cookies. The families who know them accept them gladly (one of them is supposed to be a marvelous baker). We just moved here a month ago but I will happily eat treats from those ladies, because I am joining a community I can trust to watch out for its own. I also know of an older man down the road who gives away pennies. Will we skip his house because of that? No! No more than we would return a package to a favorite auntie who sends the same predictable pair of socks for Christmas every year. In my family, it's not about the loot. Your mileage may vary.
Wow. Where do you live? I've not only never lived in a community like that. I've never heard of one. It's not about my family. It's about trick-or-treating being about treats. I, personally, wouldn't have knocked on someone's door as a kid if I knew they were making popcorn balls, because I'd have felt bad throwing them out...and you couldn't have paid me to eat one, then or now.

In any case, this has wandered way afield from why anyone would deliberately feed the candy marketing/selling/buying beast that is Halloween, if they're just going to throw the candy away. I really can't wrap my head around the idea of thinking candy is so bad that it must be thrown away, while simultaneously deliberately encouraging the manufacture, distribution, sale and purchase of said candy. You can say "it's not about the candy for our family", but the current cultural construct of trick-or-treating is about the candy, and everyone knows it.
post #218 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerchild View Post
I still don't get the total over the top reactions here. You'd think that a person who chucks a handful of candy, or slightly more, might as well have singlehandedly tipped the Exxon Valdez.
I'm probably one of the "over the top" ones, because people tend to think I'm reacting way more strongly than I actually am, even irl, and it's more pronounced online.

The overall impact isn't really the thing that gets me, though. It's the deliberately going out and asking for stuff that you know you're going to throw away. I can't wrap my brain around it. I'll also admit to being kind of astonished at how many people have children who are okay with this, but that's a whole other issue.
post #219 of 275
But SB, you just got done talking about the badness of the cultural construct of this candy holiday. So frankly, aren't all parties equally wasteful and commercialized? If the whole thing is bad, trying to determine who's badder seems like a futile exercise to me. Or are you trying to point out that the people getting bent out of shape because someone threw something away are perhaps just displacing some of their own cultural guilt onto the pitchers so that they can feel better about their own sellout to Nestle/Hershey's/Corporate greed masquerading as good ol' American fun?

Do I get some credit trades from you if I mention that my children's costumes are all handmade by me based on thrift store finds, instead of prepackaged costumes by slave labor manufacturers in countries with no human rights?

Surely, if one can buy out their carbon emissions guilt from airplane travel, I can get some forgiveness/amnesty by not wholesale succumbing to the evil corporations, right?

Or maybe not. MDC can be a damned tough crowd.
post #220 of 275
Just a suggestion, if all you're into is the community of it, why say "Trick or treat?"

When I was growing up, we were not ALLOWED to say ToT when we went out. We had to say "Happy Halloween!". My parents objected to the implied threat of ToT.

It's still a community event, and saying Happy Halloween makes it even more clear that you're there for the community.
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