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Throwing candy away - Page 3

post #41 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by aspenleaves View Post
Like why even trick or treat? Why wouldn't you let your children (ages 11 - 5) eat more of the candy on a different day?

What do you think?
Trick or treating might just be the most fun part for the kids, maybe?

I totally don't agree with letting them pig out though. Eating candy during the evening is fine, but then at home it goes up in the cabinet with all the other 'treats', which we do eat, but in moderation.

(I do throw away candy that I don't approve of though- most chocolates are fine.)
post #42 of 275
I don't think it's fair to let kids "work" so hard to collect a pile of candy and then just throw it away. At the same time I can understand the parent's desire to prevent their kids from loading up on sugar day after day. We've worked out a compromise at my house. My son is allergic to nuts so all of the nutty candy goes home with grandpa after trick-or-treating. Even so we still have a TON of candy in the house. I let my kids have whatever they like on Halloween night. They then put most of the candy into a cookie jar and for the next few days can pick out 2-3 items a day. After a few days they start to lose interest and the rest goes into the freezer to be used to decorate gingerbread houses at Christmas time. We love to do the gingerbread houses but buying all that candy to decorate them is spendy so the leftover Halloween candy (M&M's, Skittles, Dots and mini chocolates) is not only colorful but saves us $$ too.
post #43 of 275
This has been an interesting thread.

My husband grew up in Kenya. On Halloween his mother scoured all of East Africa for pumpkins for the kids to carve. They carved them, lit them at night for a few nights and then his Mom got ready to toss them.

The Kenyans who worked for them at the factory and on the farm land were moritifed. How could you throw away perfectly good pumpkin? Those pumpkins could have fed an entire family.

It really opened his mother's eyes to how different people view food and waste.

So, throwing away all the pumpkins, or composting them or whatever is technically really wasteful.
post #44 of 275
Eh, I could really care less either way. I allow the kids to eat what they want for a few days, then it goes into the pantry for lunch treats, and after 1 month, it goes away, either to dad's mouth, or in the garbage. Actually, I can't think of any that's been thrown, because dh eats it. But I wouldn't have a problem with it at all. Seriously, it's junk.

Once I give it to the kids, I could care less what happens with it. I'd rather it go in the garbage than contribute to obesity.
post #45 of 275
Well, we don't trick or treat at all. Both for religions reasons and we just don't want that amount of candy coming into our house.

However, we somehow end up showered with way more candy than we want during October (pretty much any event we go to, and friends, and family, etc).

Most of it does end up in the trash. For a week or two, I will occasionally let the boys each pick something out of the collection, but then we're done. My dh is also from Africa and has a huge problem with wasting food, but he doesn't consider candy "food", so he would actually prefer we just throw it all away and not eat any of it.
post #46 of 275
Well, my kids are still little (1.5 and 3.5) so what we do now will probably change 1000 times over by the time they are older. Not only are my kids not physically capable of eating a lot of the candy that is handed out (taffy, gumballs, jawbreakers, etc. etc.) but at such a young age I don't think they need two large bowls of candy to eat day after day until it is gone. But dressing up and trick or treating is SO much fun! Running around with their friends and cousins, pretending to be a fireman or a ghost or whatever, collecting candy and eating suckers. When we get home I talk to them about which candies are for bigger kids and remove those items. Then they can pick what they want to keep out of what is left, and the rest is traded in for a new toy. Dh takes any chocolate/candy bars/etc to work, I save what I can for baking (M&Ms, etc) or potty training (Smarties, Jelly beans
, gummy bears, etc). The rest gets thrown away.

IMO they participate in an age-appropriate level at this time and as they get older the amount of candy they keep will grow and change. But as a child I remember a lot of my Halloween candy going stale and eventually getting tossed too... the Smarties, the red and black peanut butter things, the things that no one liked. No way am I going to either tell my kids they either have to eat it all, or be banned from trick or treating because they are being wasteful.
post #47 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calidris View Post
really?

Whether it goes into the bin, or through your gut into the toilet isn't that big a difference is it? It's not like there is any significant nutritional value being wasted. I could understand the outrage if it was organic meat and veggies being tossed, those could do good for someone else. But junk candy is not contributing anything (except a few calories).
Well, one could argue that it's wasteful in the production, etc...not to mention people's buudgets. I think you're better off not taking it.

I let my kids eat some candy, I save anything chocolate for baking, if I can. And if there is anyleft a week or so later, they don't really care and I donate it to PADS.
post #48 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenmansions View Post
I'm with Pkutniewski. I let my kids go trick or treating, but I throw away a lot of the candy they get - it's total crap. Why help them develop a taste for it? .
Why help the develop a habit of taking and tossing? That everything we don't want can be put in the garbage. We are running out of room.
post #49 of 275
I think it would be better to find someone to give it or to send a couple pieces each day in their lunch for awhile or something like that. We just ate ours over the next month or whatever as kids and after a week all of it went into a general family candy bowl. My Mom also made sure we only took one piece of candy at each house so we didn't have such an overwhelming amount.

Once we were older, we started trick-or-treating with my church youth group and went to the same neighborhood each year and collected non-perishable food to donate to a food bank. We didn't collect candy, though we would take a piece if someone really, really wanted to give it to us. It was a nice way to have the fun of dressing up and visiting all the houses without feeling like we were just teens trying to get some free candy and the neighborhood we went to caught on fast and would have bags of stuff waiting for us for Halloween.
post #50 of 275
Our kids trick or treat because they love it. We keep all the candy in a bucket (once I've taken out all the ones they can't have because of allergies). The candy stays in there usually until we get buried in Valentine's candy and we empty the bucket and start again. Seriously, 5 months after Halloween, some of that stuff could break windows. I don't feel bad at all. And I do let my kids have candy regularly. I don't eat candy so it takes awhile to get through all of it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pkutniewski View Post
As for the PP who spoke of paying good money for candy why does it matter to you what is done with it after you have GIVEN IT AWAY? Honestly, it makes no sense to be insulted by something that you have given to a child to do with as they please. they may dislike the kind of candy given to them and throw it out anyway. Would that be any different?
I was wondering that too. If you don't want to waste your money on candy, don't get any and leave your light off. We don't get trick or treaters out in the country so I don't worry about it, but really, who cares if a kid eats it or throws it away?

I think this thread is funny. So many posts here about these awful mainstream parents giving their children candy and yet those of us who do throw away some candy are horrible. You just can't win.
post #51 of 275
We keep it around for a few months and then toss it out when the next big holiday loaded with treats rolls around.

DS doesn't get a ton of candy from TOT, and truthfully he doesn't care much for it. We eat the good stuff, the rest basically sits there until I come across it a few months later and throw it out.

I don't really care for throwing out the candy the very next day, but I'm coming from a place where my mom used to just take the candy and not give us any after we spent hours TOT.
post #52 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjawm View Post
Eh, I could really care less either way. I allow the kids to eat what they want for a few days, then it goes into the pantry for lunch treats, and after 1 month, it goes away, either to dad's mouth, or in the garbage. Actually, I can't think of any that's been thrown, because dh eats it. But I wouldn't have a problem with it at all. Seriously, it's junk.

Once I give it to the kids, I could care less what happens with it. I'd rather it go in the garbage than contribute to obesity.


ITA.
post #53 of 275
When we go (not every year, sometimes we do something else), we take a walk around the neighborhood. We visit some houses to collect candy, and end up with about 10 houses' worth. Not enough to go to waste. We throw out really nasty candy but besides that we eat it or DH takes it to work to share.

If we are home, we either hand out candy bars, or glow sticks or playdoh or something.
post #54 of 275
Wow! Being classified 'junk food' group makes it ok to take and toss? If you think it's junk why allow your children to take it in the first place?

I don't understand this. Regardless of the nutritional value - energy, water, labour and other resources are put into making this stuff. Taking something you don't need or want because it is there and available or because it is tradition just seems so wrong to me. What is wrong with "No, thank you" or "Thank you, we're going to pass on the sweets this year". Just because it is readily available in excess it doesn't make it ok to dispose.

I don't think it's that the candy could've fed to an otherwise starving child, it's about teaching children to take only what they need and to be responsible with resources - big and small.

Whilst my suggestions might not be the best options and some members may not see it the way l do, there are always alternatives, always other ways to do things. I think we probably all have some room in our lives to be more waste wise and less a part of consumerism.
post #55 of 275
This reminds me of a story:

When I was 19, I went to Italy on a tour with my mother and my brother. The tour included an evening at a restaurant with "half a bottle or wine/person." My brother and I sat at this table "manfully" trying to finish our wine so it didn't go to waste. My parents, while they weren't strict followed the law. I wasn't allowed alcohol at 18 because they law said I had to be 21. But in Italy, of course, the law was different. And let's just say I didn't have a lot of experience with "vino." At the end of the night, as the tour got ready to leave, I was standing up, trying to suck down the last of the wine. And my mother said something very wise - better in the trash, than in your stomach. And she was really right about that. I had enjoyed the wine with dinner. I was done enjoying it. There was no point in putting MORE wine in my stomach, just to not waste it. It really was better off in the trash than in my stomach.

We get to that point with our candy. It's not necessarily on Halloween night, but at some point, I determine that the candy has been enjoyed, is just temptation, ant-trap, stale, causing issues, and it goes out. And I think that this garbage is better off in the trash than hanging around my house. I might bring it to work, but then I have the same problem. It will end up in my stomach. And DH, of all people, does NOT need the tempation.

I could see how if sugar really caused your kid issues - like aggression or hyperactivity that it would be better to just get it all over with in one night and get rid of the candy. Sometimes it's better not to have the temptation around - the power struggles, the fights, the begging, the bargaining.

We get a LOT of kids at our house on halloween. We plan for 10 bags of candy and Dh buys about 2 per week all through October. With something like candy, I don't really care what anyone does with it when it's gone. The joy is in giving it out. Now, if I made someone a handmade gift (knitted or sewn), I might care if it got tossed. But not candy. Our houses are very close together, so we also GET a lot of candy. Our neighborhood is a "destination" neighborhood and kids from other neighborhoods arrive by the carload to ToT here. And DH and I think that is AWESOME.

I have a bigger issue with what to do with crappy strings of beads - like from Mardi Gras parades, pirate parties, pinanatas. And those crappy little toys from the doctors office. We are inundated with them. My next plan is to let DD keep 3 strings of each kind and see if we can purge the remainder.
post #56 of 275
I don't really care if people throw it away. But I think if the kids know it's going to get tossed the very next day (like in the OP), it could make them more likely to eat way more than they normally would on Halloween night.

I'm not against a Halloween pig-out, but if I knew I only had a few hours' access to my candy as a kid, I probably would have eaten as much as I possibly could instead of just having several pieces and saving the rest for later.

For that reason, even if I were the type to throw away leftover Halloween candy, it'd probably spend at least a week in the house before I'd toss it.
post #57 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by betsyj View Post
This has been an interesting thread.

My husband grew up in Kenya. On Halloween his mother scoured all of East Africa for pumpkins for the kids to carve. They carved them, lit them at night for a few nights and then his Mom got ready to toss them.

The Kenyans who worked for them at the factory and on the farm land were moritifed. How could you throw away perfectly good pumpkin? Those pumpkins could have fed an entire family.

It really opened his mother's eyes to how different people view food and waste.

So, throwing away all the pumpkins, or composting them or whatever is technically really wasteful.
Not every one throws out pumpkins! I also consider that to be a waste. They are carved the day of, and then the next day I bake them until they are soft and freeze them in 1 cup amounts to use in baking and soups.

Waste is waste.

I am SHOCKED on MDC to see so many people OK with just throwing things out. It's really very horrible. Why not just do disposable diapers then? Why bother buying bulk and using reusable containers to take snacks?

It's actually quite sickening to read how many people think it's perfectly OK to just throw out the candy rather than donating it to charity or giving directly to the less fortunate.
post #58 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dizzie View Post
Wow! Being classified 'junk food' group makes it ok to take and toss? If you think it's junk why allow your children to take it in the first place?

I don't understand this. Regardless of the nutritional value - energy, water, labour and other resources are put into making this stuff. Taking something you don't need or want because it is there and available or because it is tradition just seems so wrong to me. What is wrong with "No, thank you" or "Thank you, we're going to pass on the sweets this year". Just because it is readily available in excess it doesn't make it ok to dispose.

I don't think it's that the candy could've fed to an otherwise starving child, it's about teaching children to take only what they need and to be responsible with resources - big and small.

Whilst my suggestions might not be the best options and some members may not see it the way l do, there are always alternatives, always other ways to do things. I think we probably all have some room in our lives to be more waste wise and less a part of consumerism.
I agree. I don't think the candy is sacred food but it seems wasteful to toss if and take it if you know you don't want it.
post #59 of 275
Wow, I'm surprised that so many people feel so strongly about throwing out some candy.

DS has food allergies. I'm not going to stop at every place, read the label to decide whether the candy is safe for him to eat and then reject the candy that he can't eat. (I can't even imagine how that exchange would go: DS: "Trick or treat" Me: "Let me see the label for that candy. No, no, he can't have this. DS, say no thank you." Umm, no.)

We go trick or treating and when we get home I sort through his stuff and pull out what he can't eat. If it's most of the candy (often it is), I trade him some candy he can eat from what we bought to hand out. DH and I eat some of DS' discards, but some of it is stuff we don't like. DS doesn't usually have all that much candy to start with, maybe 30 to 40 small pieces?

So in the end we probably have 10 to 20 small pieces of candy that DS can't eat and we don't want. It's junk food. I'm not sure that giving it to someone else is really a kindness. It's sort of like giving an Ezzo book to someone else because you don't want it. Not to mention that I can't see it being worth the effort for the small amount of candy we have laying around. Really, you all think I should use a gallon or more of gas to drive to a homeless shelter to give them 10 to 20 tootsie rolls?

Catherine
post #60 of 275
I've been known to add the candy ds won't eat to the treats we hand out since he is usually done trick or treating before the older kids give up. I do feel guilty donating candy that I don't want my own ds to eat, stuff with trans fats particularly. When he is given a choice of different candy, I'll help him pick the kind he would like. Since he doesn't like nuts or super sour things, I can steer him toward his preferences when he isn't familiar with the choices. So we try not to take things ds wouldn't eat. He'll decide he has lots of candy and say it's time to go home, at some point long before he really has a lot, imo. I will throw out the random pieces of candy with trans fats that we didn't manage to avoid during trick or treating. I hate waste but I also feel like it isn't ethical to give other kids things I don't want my own child to eat.
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