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Ugandan and Rwandan adoption, for anyone who might be interested... - Page 2

post #21 of 43
Wow! I didn't realize this was a referral thread! CONGRATULATIONS!!!!! Wishing you a smooth and easy process, and lots of love in your family-to-be.
post #22 of 43
Thread Starter 
Thanks you guys!!

ROM, it wasn't really a referral thread, but it turned into one!

It's not looking like November travel is going to happen, sadly. I'm trying to focus on how much more convenient it will be to travel in January (courts close in december) for so many reasons, plus a little more time to prepare, but I want them home NOW!!! I *may* still get to go in november, but I highly doubt it...

Thandiwe, I can't really add much to what I said before about cost -- if you have any other specific questions, though, ask away!
post #23 of 43
How did you get connected with the laywer you are working with? How does he find children? Are they at one specific orphanage and how do they end up there?
post #24 of 43
Thread Starter 
I got in contact with our lawyer through another online friend who is using him. word of mouth, you could say. most independent adopters have blogs these days, so it's pretty easy to connect either through blogs or facebook or yahoo groups or what have you.

Our lawyer is in touch with orphanage staff (I think at a few different orphanges?), and just asks if they have children available for adoption. The two we're adopting have "unknown" listed for both parents, and we know the baby's story, but not the toddler's (yet -- we will know it soon). abandonment is usually the reason for them being in the orphanage. some of the kids in the orphanage have living, known relatives, and you would have to decide if you wanted to pursue adopting them, if the relatives agreed to it -- they would be in severe poverty, in those cases, and unable to meet their children's basic needs. Our first match was a little girl with a living father (though she had never been in his care, to our knowledge) and older sibs, and I agonized about taking her from them, and them from her, even though they obviously lived in crushing poverty. she died of malaria before we could get her.

Some lawyers leave you to contact the orphanages yourself, and that can work just as well. There are a few different orphanages in Uganda that are approved for adoptions, but only one in Rwanda currently.
post #25 of 43

I am truly new to this sort of thing but would very much like to find more information on Ugandan and/or Rwandan independent adoption.  Not sure what it means to "pm" you.

post #26 of 43

Tiffani, I know you must be super busy. Congratulations!

 

I would be interested in knowing what caused the delay. This thread was started over a year ago and, if I understand correctly, you ended up traveling almost a year later than you had hoped.

post #27 of 43

I'd also be interested in an update from you.  Adoption has been weighing heavily on my mind lately, and I've always had a soft spot in my heart for Africa.  Unfortunately the cost of going through an agency is extremely prohibitive for us and it would be quite some time before we would be able to afford that.

post #28 of 43

Dear Tiffani,

 

I do realize you must be super busy and prob. not on here at all. When you do get a chance... Do you happen to know of any other U.S, citizens living abroad and adopting from Uganda. I have questions to which I just cannot find the answers, as it is so rare. I would be so thrilled to talk to someone, if you know of anyone else.

post #29 of 43
Thread Starter 
I don't know of other families living abroad adopting from Uganda, but Uganda has no problem with it, as long as you have a current homestudy (and in our case we moved and didn't have to update our homestudy -- was REALLY worried about the US embassy taking issue with that, but it was a non-issue) and can provide. The issues are with the embassy issuing you a visa -- where do you live? we had to leave new zealand because they wouldn't grant the kids visas to enter NZ because we hadn't gone through the NZ adoption system (and NZ doesn't have a system for adoption that includes Uganda anyway) and because we would only have legal guardianship of the kids before finalizing in the US. You can finalize elsewhere in the world, you just have to appear in a US court (I think) to finalize. It's complicated, because you do have to follow the state rules of either the last state you lived in or the state you think you'll be returning to.... it's all a lot less official than you might think, and many of the "rules" are not hard and fast... like us coming in under the radar with moving between homestudy and court/visa issuance. I think you might have sent me this by private message as well, and I apologize for not replying -- I actually thought I was replying to your pm, but then I ended up here on this thread somehow. :) I'll check again for a pm from you, and if you have more questions, feel free to ask!!!!
post #30 of 43
Thread Starter 

oh, and we had a few different things contribute to our delay, most notably someone in Uganda took issue with the increase in adoptions happening, and told the canadian and US embassies that the adoptions/legal guardianships were illegal.  This person has since been fired, and was totally wrong, but the embassies needed official confirmation from different branches of the Ugandan gov, and it was a huge mess.  that stalled things for 4 months, but because of that stall, other things were stalled as well -- if that hadn't happened, I think NZ wouldn't have had a problem issuing the kids visas and we wouldn't have had to move -- oh, and before that, we were delayed in getting our approval from the US gov because my husband had to do his fingerprints 3 times and having them done in NZ was a bit of a gong show...  If we hadn't had the fingerprint issues we would have been in Uganda (stuck there) when the embassy stopped issuing visas for the kids to leave Uganda, and we could never have afforded for us to be there for 4 months waiting for visas... then after the embassy situation cooled off, our VERY CAREFUL lawyer (bless his heart) was hesitant to start the machine up again, and the judges were hesitant, everyone was hesitant and discussing everything, then there was a court recess for the summer... just one thing after another, really...

post #31 of 43

Thanks so much, Tiffani!

 

Our situation is actually quite similar, as the country we are in does not allow anyone to adopt without it being through one of the three existing programs (which deal with very few countries). We are not able to move out for at least 3 years and might like to stay here, anyway. I wonder how long we would need to love in the US in order to just go through them and bypass this (in this matter stupid) country.

 

Did you need to use a US social worker for the home study or would the US accept anyone who is certified in the country you live in or whatever? I am just so stuck and don't even know where to begin to truly research all this. On one hand I am finding out that dh's US citizenship would not help us at all since we now live here... On the other, that it might help. I have no clue.

 

I guess we would need to have guardianship and a US visa for the child and travel there.... Then we would have to wait until the adoption was final (how long might this take?) and maybe then we would be able to return home. If it is so, it does not sound doable for us. :(

post #32 of 43

Hi there,

 

My husband and I are from New Zealand, yet it seems really restrictive here to adopt from any african country. We were aware of the Ugandan option but get stale-mated by NZ law. How did you manage to adopt Ugandan children while in NZ? Is it because you are citizens elsewhere, or because you went through the process after leaving NZ?

 

Open to any suggestions, we have one son but would love to add two or three extra to our family!!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tiffani View Post

So... we moved to New Zealand, and stumbled onto Uganda, which has been difficult for some people, but through the wonderful world of blogging, we learned the pitfalls and also made a lot of contacts, which is everything in indy adoption. You really do need experienced families to help you through the process.
post #33 of 43

Ignore me . . . just read the full thread and I see you had to leave NZ. We may have to do the same thing!!

post #34 of 43
Thread Starter 

yes, sorry jadagrace, it would be difficult while living in NZ to adopt from Uganda.  At the same time, NZ is so very logical, I wonder if you might be able to convince the powers that be that their laws are outdated and perhaps you could get them changed?  It would at least be worth a try -- might take years, but I think it takes a few years just to get through the homestudy process anyway, so you could give it a shot?   When I talked to the folks at the department of child welfare (or whatever the agency is called that deals with adoptions there) they were very helpful in trying to find a  workable solution for us, but in the end, nothing could be done.  Best wishes!!

 

 

post #35 of 43
Thread Starter 

Quote:

Originally Posted by LessTraveledBy View Post
Did you need to use a US social worker for the home study or would the US accept anyone who is certified in the country you live in or whatever? I am just so stuck and don't even know where to begin to truly research all this. On one hand I am finding out that dh's US citizenship would not help us at all since we now live here... On the other, that it might help. I have no clue.

 

You can use a US social worker, or someone who is certified in your country of residence, but the homestudy must then be approved by a US agency, I believe... or maybe we just had to do that because our homestudy lady was independently certified, so she had to send our homestudy to a US agency and they looked it over and approved it for $600.

 

you should look into adopting as americans living abroad, that would be your official status, using your husband's citizenship.  Your country of residence will also have it's own laws surrounding issuing your adopted children visas.  The biggest sticky point for us was that in uganda they only issue you legal guardianship -- with a full adoption order, NZ would have let the kids in on the same visas our bio kids had.

 

 

Quote:

I guess we would need to have guardianship and a US visa for the child and travel there.... Then we would have to wait until the adoption was final (how long might this take?) and maybe then we would be able to return home. If it is so, it does not sound doable for us. :(

There are a few states where you can finalize an adoption fairly quickly. Hawaii is one of them, Texas another... Hawaii also does quickie passports, so a lot of americans living abroad stop off in hawaii to finalize their child's adoptions, get their passport, then return to their country of residence.

post #36 of 43

We are thinking baout adopting from Uganda and am wondering if we should do it with an attorney for less money.  Please email me and let me know how it all is going.  Thanks!

Jill

funk50@charter.net

post #37 of 43
Thread Starter 
Because of the slowdown in Ethiopia, I have had a lot of messages about Ugandan adoption, so I thought I should update this thread. Rwandan adoption is essentially halted currently, from what I understand, while they implement the Hague, but there are others here with more information about that, specifically ariah'smum. :-) Ugandan adoption is alive and well, and there are agencies operating there, but you can just as easily adopt independently for a lot less money. If you are looking for an older or special needs child, AAI is a wonderful agency, and their Ugandan program coordinator is working tirelessly to find families for these kids. The best place to gather information is on the Ugandan adoption facebook group. It's a closed group, so you have to request to join, but as long as you're an interested family, you are eligible to join, we just want to keep out anyone working or volunteering for agencies, orphanages, lawyers, etc, so that we can all speak freely. In a nutshell, you can go with an agency, and other than AAI, I don't know anything about any of them, so can't speak to that. The facebook group is great if you have questions about agencies. If you want to adopt independently, you contact a reputable lawyer (again, facebook group is great for recommendations) who may or may not be able to help you find a waiting child. There has been a flood of interest in Ugandan adoption, so finding a baby is much more difficult now than even a few months ago, but it's not impossible. If you are willing to make a trip to Uganda to network and find a child, it can be done rather quickly and ethically. If you can't do that, you have to contact babies' homes yourself, and inquire about waiting children. Uganda is not going to be a great place to adopt babies from -- it can happen, and there are many abandoned babies each year in some regions, but the wait for these children is only going to grow, while so many toddlers, young children, and older children wait and wait. I have known families who have adopted Ugandan children of all ages (including teens) and it is amazing how well they adjust. The Ugandan culture is very warm and loving, and the kids are held and loved and honored. My kids are nuts, I have to run, but join the facebook group if you're seriously wanting more information about Ugandan adoption!
post #38 of 43

Thanks for the info! What is the full name for AAI? There are a couple organization that use that acronym so I want to be sure I am getting the right one. 

post #39 of 43
Thread Starter 

Adoption Advocates International in Washington

http://adoptionadvocates.org/about/about_aai.php

 

this is a wonderful program looking to find families for older and special needs kiddos.

post #40 of 43

Hi Tiffani! I am over the top excited to have found your post here and would LOVE to talk on the phone. I lived in UGanda for a while and run a ministry there, and got married 1.5 years ago and living in Colorado- and have a huge burden to research how to adopt from Uganda. I know the process on that side, but would Love to talk to you about how to do it independently like you did!! Lets talk!
 

I see you wrote this in 2009, Hope you read this and get back to me! kelseyinafrica@gmail.com

 

blessings,

kelsey

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